Anyone as new to fighting games as me?

#1 Edited by MonkfishEsq (221 posts) -

A little backstory. The last 3 fighting games I've played are MK9..then DoA for the dreamcast and finally Tekken on the PS1. So as far as fighting game history goes...mine is pretty terrible. I got skullgirls because it was supposed to pull back the veil on the 'meta' behind fighting games that's just so confusing to someone who hasn't been playing these games from the start. The tutorial was okay but I feel like there is still so much that it isn't teaching me (for instance, how the fuck do you do your tag partners special?)

I just tried a little online and got utterly *destroyed* in every single game but one. Checking their achivements they had hundreds of points in SF4, MvC, Blazblue..the list goes on. I don't have an arcade stick and don't really feel like spending £100 for a game that I'm in all likely hood going to stay terrible at.

So is there anyone out there that has this as new as me that wants to practice? I just want to not feel physically terrible after every match because I can't even manage to get off a combo against these people :( I really want to learn, it's just impossible *to* learn anything when you're beaten this badly.

#2 Posted by Pazy (2553 posts) -

I first got into fighting games with BlazBlue: Calamity Trigger, not one was that great great because it required less precision and tied some basic moves to the right analog stick (I couldent do a quarter circle for a while...) but honestly no matter how many tutorials they give you the thing that got me through it was that I had a friend who is great at fighting games who sat next to me and taught me as well as then "training" me online.

#3 Posted by PerfidiousSinn (716 posts) -

I'm fairly new to fighting games as well but luckily I've got a few friends who are much better than me helping me learn.

http://wiki.shoryuken.com/Skullgirls

I find myself going back to this website a lot to read up on systems and try to memorize character's attacks and their properties (character info). It's gonna take a lot of practice before I stop getting destroyed online though.

#4 Posted by MAST (778 posts) -

@MonkfishEsq said:

So is there anyone out there that has this as new as me that wants to practice? I just want to not feel physically terrible after every match because I can't even manage to get off a combo against these people :( I really want to learn, it's just impossible *to* learn anything when you're beaten this badly.

I'm in a similar situation as you. I might have a little more understanding of fighting games than you do, but not by much. However, I have Skullgirls on the PS3, and judging by your profile, it looks like you're a 360 person?

If not, feel free to add me and I'll play some games with you to see how we match up.

PSN = MAST83

#5 Posted by mosespippy (3751 posts) -

I have never played a fighting game before. I have downloaded Battle Fantasia and Super Street Fighter 2 Turbo HD Remix from PSN+ but have yet to actually play them because I haven't had the time. I'd like to but I also don't have anyone to play them with.

#6 Posted by wemibelec90 (1280 posts) -

I'm also very new. Played a few games online of Street Fighter IV, enough to know that I didn't want to play anymore online games. I've just never put the time in to learn a character well enough to feel comfortable online.

#7 Edited by HadesTimes (793 posts) -

While Skullgirls does have a good tutorial. It's emphasis on execution could really throw new folks off. If I had to pick a first modern fighting game it would be the new MK. It has an excellent training mode and a good story mode. It IS probably way more expensive than Skullgirls, but maybe you could get a used copy for around the same price.

Oh and just so you know, most people in the fighting game community have been waiting for this game for around two years. So that's mainly who its popular with, so there will be some REAL sharks playing. Especially now with tournaments coming up.

#8 Edited by IndieFinch (242 posts) -

I can feel your pain. My fighting game interest has really only peaked in the past few months with picking up SF4AE, SFxT, and now Skullgirls, where as most of my gaming experience is fully in Strategy games. The one thing that could suggest is to look at it as a new challenge / something to strive for. Watch the tournaments online, follow the top players, and just accept that you wont be able to compete at that level. However just try to stay within your boundaries and set little goals. If its winning an online match, to beating the AI on a certain difficulty, to even attempting some cool combos you see online. I know for me personally, I was having a rough time on the Normal difficulty. So I finished off the tutorial, set my focus to learning Filia and Valentine. Now after a week or so of really practicing, I can actually brezze through that level of AI. And I actually won a few online matches the other day, it felt damn good.

Just hang in there and try to have fun on what you can have fun with. If your on PSN I would be down to play a whole bunch of practice games sometime. PSN = Indiefinch12

#9 Edited by MonkfishEsq (221 posts) -

@HadesTimes said:

While Skullgirls does have a good tutorial. It's emphasis on execution could really throw new folks off. If I had to pick a first modern fighting game it would be the new MK. It has an excellent training mode and a good story mode. It IS probably way more expensive than Skullgirls, but maybe you could get a used copy for around the same price.

Oh and just so you know, most people in the fighting game community have been waiting for this game for around two years. So that's mainly who its popular with, so there will be some REAL sharks playing. Especially now with tournaments coming up.

Yeah I got MK9 when it came out. It was way easy to get into because it's a 4 button game and the combo system is a little different so you're not having to memorise these crazy 30 hit combos along with everything else so you don't get instantly beaten. I got good enough where I knew my combos, knew how to cancel into specials and to not just mash on the pad. But the next level 'up' skill wise from me was like..the pressuring stuff, poking games, invincibility frames..that kind of thing. I fared pretty well against people around my own skill level but instantly died to people in that next tier up.

@IndieFinch said:

I can feel your pain. My fighting game interest has really only peaked in the past few months with picking up SF4AE, SFxT, and now Skullgirls, where as most of my gaming experience is fully in Strategy games. The one thing that could suggest is to look at it as a new challenge / something to strive for. Watch the tournaments online, follow the top players, and just accept that you wont be able to compete at that level. However just try to stay within your boundaries and set little goals. If its winning an online match, to beating the AI on a certain difficulty, to even attempting some cool combos you see online. I know for me personally, I was having a rough time on the Normal difficulty. So I finished off the tutorial, set my focus to learning Filia and Valentine. Now after a week or so of really practicing, I can actually brezze through that level of AI. And I actually won a few online matches the other day, it felt damn good.

Just hang in there and try to have fun on what you can have fun with. If your on PSN I would be down to play a whole bunch of practice games sometime. PSN = Indiefinch12

Oh don't worry I've always accepted that I'll never be as good as the pros and I never will be! They operate on a whole other level compared to everyone else that it's pretty hard to actually learn from their matches because they just know so much more I just spend the whole match thinking 'what the hell is going on? I know that these people are fighting but they might also be wizards.

I'll give a rundown of the matches I played last night. I was matched up against the same 2 guys about 2-3 times each? On account of it being around 1am UK time and picking Europe matches only.

They picked Peacock/Double. I Got fullscreen zoned the entire game by Peacock and had no idea how to deal with it because it was an endless stream of projectiles and assists and I couldn't even get a hit in

Solo Valentine that would just pull off the biggest combo and annihilate me.

The only game I managed to win was against somebody in the US and it was a total fluke at that.

I don't really have anyone to practice with so if anyone wants to play my GT is Monk Esquire. Don't have a PS3 so I'm out of luck there!

#10 Posted by el_tajij (704 posts) -

@MonkfishEsq said:

A little backstory. The last 3 fighting games I've played are MK9..then DoA for the dreamcast and finally Tekken on the PS1. So as far as fighting game history goes...mine is pretty terrible. I got skullgirls because it was supposed to pull back the veil on the 'meta' behind fighting games that's just so confusing to someone who hasn't been playing these games from the start. The tutorial was [i]okay[/i] but I feel like there is still so much that it isn't teaching me (for instance, how the fuck do you do your tag partners special?)

I just tried a little online and got utterly *destroyed* in every single game but one. Checking their achivements they had hundreds of points in SF4, MvC, Blazblue..the list goes on. I don't have an arcade stick and don't really feel like spending £100 for a game that I'm in all likely hood going to stay terrible at.

So is there anyone out there that has this as new as me that wants to practice? I just want to not feel physically terrible after every match because I can't even manage to get off a combo against these people :( I really want to learn, it's just impossible *to* learn anything when you're beaten this badly.

I know your pain! I'm fairly new, I started thinking about getting into fighting games back when Street Fighter IV came out, then when Blazblue came out I actually started trying to sort of 'practice' but it's only recently that I've really started to try and push to be fairly competent.

You clearly seem to like arcade games, I'd say it's worth getting a cheap stick to practice with - just cause it makes the game feel way better and the inputs are SO MUCH EASIER. The first one I bought was like £21.99 or something. It only lasted about 9-10 months but it really helped me get the feel for one.

It takes time to get any good. But God, it feels good when you suddenly realize you're winning matches and out playing people. My advice if you're really new is LEARN TO BLOCK. It might sound obvious but it's the most important thing I learnt in fighting games was to work on my defense. Even if you play Arcade mode and just see if you can block every attack the AI throws at you. I found it helped me so much.

#11 Posted by IndieFinch (242 posts) -

@MonkfishEsq said:

Oh don't worry I've always accepted that I'll never be as good as the pros and I never will be! They operate on a whole other level compared to everyone else that it's pretty hard to actually learn from their matches because they just know so much more I just spend the whole match thinking 'what the [i]hell[/i] is going on? I know that these people are fighting but they might also be wizards.

I'll give a rundown of the matches I played last night. I was matched up against the same 2 guys about 2-3 times each? On account of it being around 1am UK time and picking Europe matches only.

They picked Peacock/Double. I Got fullscreen zoned the entire game by Peacock and had no idea how to deal with it because it was an endless stream of projectiles and assists and I couldn't even get a hit in

Solo Valentine that would just pull off the biggest combo and annihilate me.

The only game I managed to win was against somebody in the US and it was a total fluke at that.

I don't really have anyone to practice with so if anyone wants to play my GT is Monk Esquire. Don't have a PS3 so I'm out of luck there!

Has the match making adjusted your tier yet? Seems like the more you lose it will drop you into lower brackets, but it took quite a bit of ranked losses. Outside of that, I had luck with creating a lobby and setting the title of it to "beginner" or

"casual". I got another guy in there who was similar in skill and we played 20+ matches all of which were really competitive. It was a lot of fun, but also seems like a luck of the draw type of thing.

#12 Posted by darkvare (742 posts) -
@mosespippy: i have battle fantasia i'll play with you if you want psn donvarone
#13 Posted by MonkfishEsq (221 posts) -

@el_tajij said:

You clearly seem to like arcade games, I'd say it's worth getting a cheap stick to practice with - just cause it makes the game feel way better and the inputs are SO MUCH EASIER. The first one I bought was like £21.99 or something. It only lasted about 9-10 months but it really helped me get the feel for one.

What stick would that be then? I checked Amazon for pads/sticks and what I could find were the SF/Tekken 6 button pads and the £100 SF arcade stick.

@IndieFinch said:

Has the match making adjusted your tier yet? Seems like the more you lose it will drop you into lower brackets, but it took quite a bit of ranked losses. Outside of that, I had luck with creating a lobby and setting the title of it to "beginner" or "casual". I got another guy in there who was similar in skill and we played 20+ matches all of which were really competitive. It was a lot of fun, but also seems like a luck of the draw type of thing.

Does the game show you what tier you're in anywhere? I was just hitting quick match and didn't see anything like that in the menus.

#14 Posted by el_tajij (704 posts) -

@MonkfishEsq said:

@el_tajij said:

You clearly seem to like arcade games, I'd say it's worth getting a cheap stick to practice with - just cause it makes the game feel way better and the inputs are SO MUCH EASIER. The first one I bought was like £21.99 or something. It only lasted about 9-10 months but it really helped me get the feel for one.

What stick would that be then? I checked Amazon for pads/sticks and what I could find were the SF/Tekken 6 button pads and the £100 SF arcade stick.

You're right, there's not a lot going on amazon at the moment. The one I bought was the Subsonic stick, but due to a PS3 update the stick became incompatible with the PS3 so DON'T get that one. I have to leave for work in a minute but I'll try and have a look around for a few if nobody else recommends one when I'm home. I don't think you can really go wrong with many of them, I'd just find the cheapest one, check out a few reviews to make sure it doesn't completely suck. It makes fighting games ten times more fun and unique. I couldn't imagine and think I'd refuse to play a fighting game with a gamepad these days. It's like playing the piano on an iphone or something.

#15 Posted by IndieFinch (242 posts) -

@MonkfishEsq said:

Does the game show you what tier you're in anywhere? I was just hitting quick match and didn't see anything like that in the menus.

When you select Quick Match it should say "Searching for a Tier X opponent." For me at least, it started at 5, now it searches for Tier 2 opponents where I actually have a chance to win now. Just took 15 or 20 games to slowly adjust it seemed.

#16 Posted by MonkfishEsq (221 posts) -

@IndieFinch said:

When you select Quick Match it should say "Searching for a Tier X opponent." For me at least, it started at 5, now it searches for Tier 2 opponents where I actually have a chance to win now. Just took 15 or 20 games to slowly adjust it seemed.

Ah right, that is a lot of games of getting horribly beaten! But I guess it does make sense for it to take a while to figure out where you should be. Does it use ELO?

#17 Posted by killacam (1283 posts) -

seems like everyone online can put together a combo but me :(

#18 Posted by Dtat (1621 posts) -

@killacam said:

seems like everyone online can put together a combo but me :(

That's because I'M not online yet!

#19 Posted by MonkfishEsq (221 posts) -

@killacam said:

seems like everyone online can put together a combo but me :(

Yeah I can relate. You spend most of the round on the defensive just trying to survive and then you get an opening to do a combo and it's just like.."shit..what do I do oh god which buttons do I press again? oh..nevermind they already recovered and started to kick my ass"

#20 Posted by IndieFinch (242 posts) -

@MonkfishEsq said:

Ah right, that is a lot of games of getting horribly beaten! But I guess it does make sense for it to take a while to figure out where you should be. Does it use ELO?

Not too sure, but it did seem to take a bit longer then other matchmaking systems.

#21 Posted by MonkfishEsq (221 posts) -

@IndieFinch said:

@MonkfishEsq said:

Ah right, that is a lot of games of getting horribly beaten! But I guess it does make sense for it to take a while to figure out where you should be. Does it use ELO?

Not too sure, but it did seem to take a bit longer then other matchmaking systems.

Ah well. I guess I should just try to at least get in the right tier for matchmaking. The biggest handicap for me right now I feel is my 360 controller. I do have the new silver one with the better d-pad but just mimicking the placement of my fingers as if using an arcade stick I can see how it would be vastly better.

Looks like almost everyone has this for PS3 as well :(

#22 Posted by IndieFinch (242 posts) -

@MonkfishEsq: You should check out the Fighting Pads. They cost around 40$ and are a good stepping stone to see if you want to go all in on a fighting stick. They feel comfortable and having all 6 buttons on the front of the pad makes a major difference.

#23 Posted by FetchTheDubliners (14 posts) -

I've been playing fighting games since back in the day when you'd go to the Arcade and pop quarters for lives.

I am really excited to try skull girls once I get some cash.

#24 Edited by M_Shini (548 posts) -

First fighting game i did play was properly Tekken 3 on and off randomly but i never really played any fighting game for a serious amount of time until Soul Caliber 2 since to many it was a very easy game to pick up and for most instance's mash your way through, i did play 3 after that and then i played a bunch of Tekken 5 which i was really into, but i would still say i was a amateur only really capable of a very small amount of moves that i had figured out over my unchanging mashing of the buttons. After all of them i had gotten tired of just mashing and wanted to at least be somewhat capable at playing and knowing what im doing.

So seeing a tutorial that's more than just the training mode stuff i had done before in other games is properly something to make me check Skullgirls out, Although even still i could do with listening to someone explain even a little more in depth to why all these mechanics are in play.

#25 Posted by Stefanten (51 posts) -

@KittyMeggerz:

Good thing about Skullgirls is that they actually use the common terms for stuff like hit-confirms, mix-ups etc, so you can easily find out more about these concepts online.

#26 Posted by Tharrington (117 posts) -

@MonkfishEsq: I find that the best plan is to play people you know locally. It allows you to learn a lot quicker just by being able to interact more directly with people you know and trust. That being said I'm not great at fighting games, my skill is quite lacking, I just think they're super fun. If you ever want to play my GT is Tharringbone and I'd be happy to go a few rounds with you.

#27 Posted by MonkfishEsq (221 posts) -

So I finally decided to put some more time into Skullgirls. I knew that I didn't have a single hope in hell of ever beating someone so but I wanted to take my knocks so at least the game would put me in the right tier and hopefully match me up with people around my skill level.

Boy was I wrong. For around 3 hours I was mercilessly beaten into a bloody pulp by nothing but peacock/double, peacock/valentine and solo valentine players. It was honestly physically depressing in real life to be beaten that badly and not have a chance to learn what I was doing wrong or learn how to at least block half of the shit that was coming at me. I didn't get an accurate count but I can estimate that I lost around 30 games in a row. That doesn't seem fair at all and especially for me having never played a 6 button fighting game before.

I looked around every single menu in the game, the versus menus and even the leaderboard, which by the way didn't even have my W/L ratio. The only option was to see my gamertag. Is it even actually possible to know what tier of players you're in? Because from where I'm sitting all I could do was guess. I couldn't even tell if the people beating me were in the top class players or someone who's only practiced in training for a couple of hours. If I was moved into the lowest tier then there really is no hope for me.

The average skill level of people I was matched up against today was about 5 times in order of magnitude better than I was. Not in like a 'It would just take a little more practice' kind of better. It was more like a 'They managed to get one hit on me and then chain that into a 50 hit combo' kind of better. Every single action I tried to take ingame would just be instantly countered and punished. When I actually managed to block one of their disgusting combos I couldn't even capitalise on it at all. Not even with a piddly little 2-3 hit combo.

I want to like you, Skullgirls. Why won't you let me play with people who *don't* have combined achievement points of a minimum of 1000 with every single fighting game release over the last 5 years. Why can't I fight people as bad as I am, so I at least have somewhere to start? Looking around the rest of the internet it seems nobody gives a shit about this kind of thing. I'm just met with instantly FGT community hostility. "Oh, you're trying to learn how to play? heh you fucking scrub stop complaining" I can physically feel the smug gitiness through my monitor and across the internet from these people. Sorry I haven't been playing fighting games for over 10 years :( My one saving grace is that I managed to beat one guy at the very end of my play session. It felt like he was around my level because we were kind of flailing around each other trying to get in. So that brings my W/L to around 2/40+

I'm really not feeling this 'new player friendly' vibe anymore :(

#28 Posted by Ninja_Welshman (469 posts) -

I've been playing beat-um-ups since Yie Ar Kung Fu on spectrum and even built my own custom arcade stick for SFIV but guess what, I still always get blown up online. like all thing in life, you wanna be good, practice, practice, practise.

#29 Posted by MonkfishEsq (221 posts) -

What kind of 'practice' though. You're saying that like a catch all term of 'oh just play and you'll automatically get better.' How exactly am I supposed to practice when the trueskill system Microsoft uses matches me up with people with whom its impossible to practice with on account of them being leagues ahead of me in terms of skill.

Or should I just be practicing against the motionless AI dummy in the training room? I don't have £100 to spend on an arcade stick so I'm automatically at a disadvantage using the pad.

#30 Posted by PerfidiousSinn (716 posts) -

You're gonna lose a lot online just because there are so many people who've been at this for years. Getting to the point where you can consistently win online is a long process though; some of the best players in the world started from huge losing streaks and still occasionally get bested online, from what I've seen in streams. Honestly I'm at the point where I don't expect to win consistently even though I can beat the computer on Normal (woo!)

It really is a huge help to practice with people you know, either online or locally because it's the best way to get feedback and find out WHY you lost. It's definitely better than training mode, which is only useful for practicing combos for people who are really good. I watch a lot of tournaments and have picked up some strategies from there, so maybe you can try that: these guyshave a weekly Skullgirls tourney.

I could just be talking out of my ass because I've got no experience with tag fighters such as this AND I suck too. But I'm willing to help if I can. GT: Perfidious Sinn

#31 Edited by MonkfishEsq (221 posts) -

Yeah I know. I knew from the start that I was never going to be able to consistently win straight away. People wrongly think that I want to be able to beat people without any practice but that's just not it at all. My biggest concern is never being matched up with people at my skill level. I found out yesterday that the 360 version uses MS Trueskill for its online matchmaking (I wrongly thought it used the PS3 tier system)

The point where beating your head against people who you never have a chance of beating and never have a chance to learn from has been extremely early for me. I've never fought anyone that didn't use Peacock/Double or Peacock/Valentine. One of the matches where I felt like I could learn something and maybe actually have a chance was a German guy who used solo Cerebella. It started off pretty well but once he hit me he turned that into a 30 hit combo every single time and just annihilated me.

I've added you and just holla if you ever want to fight!

e: Another night of being beaten so badly that it's physically affecting my mood. One player in particular was using Parasol/Cerebella. He was using a throw assist with Cerebella I think. While I was in the air he'd throw out some of the napalm balls and then from there kill both my characters in one gigantic chain where I couldn't even block a single move.

That's one of the biggest problems I've encountered so far. Blocking low using the d-pad on my controller just never works. I tried to defend against their mix ups by blocking high then low but during their low attacks it would just flat out stop blocking no matter how much I was pressing down and back. My one saving grace is that I managed to beat a solo parasol player as Fila/Ms. Fortune. I had about one health left at the end when I got a lucky high kick in while she was doing one of her supers. My heart was beating so hard that it was actually causing my back to hurt due to the stress/adrenaline.

This can't be the only way to learn fighting games, can it? By beating your face against a brick wall made up of players who are immeasurably better than you are over and over again until you can't feel anything. I don't see how I can ever improve myself by being consistently matched up with people hundreds of times better than I am.

My birthday is coming up next month and I was seriously considering getting the sf4 arcade stick. I can already mentally picture that it is 500 times better than using a pad just because of the placement of your fingers and how you're not having to just use your thumb to hit the face buttons one at a time and then your index finger for the trigger. I know it's not going to make me instantly better and I still need to practice but will it at least make it easier to learn all this shit? The pad is just a total handicap and being completely brand new to 6 button fighters on top of that is just a whole other mountain to climb while learning fighting games.

#32 Posted by Petiew (1279 posts) -
@MonkfishEsq: I bought a cheap stick a couple of months back, I found movement and blocking much harder on the stick and I'd lose track of finger placement halfway through a round. If you do decide to get a stick just be prepared to be basically back at step one while you take months getting used to it.
 
I only got into fighting games late on last year and I understand how you feel, going 0-10 can be really demoralising sometimes but the only way you can get better is to keep playing and try to learn from your mistakes.
Only got into Skullgirls yesterday, but it doesn't seem very beginner friendly. I'd recommend Super Street Fighter 4 Arcade Edition if you want to keep playing fighting games. It's slower paced and there are no huge 100% combos, still a decent amount of people are playing and it attracts somewhat of a more casual audience than the ones that seem to be into Skullgirls now.
#33 Posted by MonkfishEsq (221 posts) -

I was actually looking at SSF4AE. It's really really cheap considering how much game there is in it. The only time I've ever played SF before was when I put my Dawn of War 2 CD key into the PC version of SF4 and have it work for some reason. Then I played against my friend using the keyboard and managed to flail my way to a win using Chun-Li.

I went looking on the Shoryuken Skullgirls page to see if they had any beginner tips like easy to learn combos that I could practice doing but there was absolutely nothing. All I could find was pages and pages of move information and frame timings. The few things I could find on google were just links to youtube videos of absolute pros pulling off max damage combos. That just isn't helpful at all.

I know losing is supposed to help you learn from your mistakes through trial and error. But right now it just feels like no trial and all error. I just read some really cool articles on gamespot that really summed up why fighting games are hard to get into and almost impossible for people like me who've never really played them before.

http://uk.gamespot.com/features/failures-in-training-6348208/

http://uk.gamespot.com/features/fixing-fighting-games-6368619/

http://uk.gamespot.com/features/fighting-games-symposium-part-i-6373250/

#34 Posted by Petiew (1279 posts) -
@MonkfishEsq: The basic combo that they show you for Filia in the tutorial is a good framework to start with. Chain a few basic moves on the ground, launch them into the air, basic attacks in the air, hit with a special move then into a super move. Once you've got that down for your character you can try the more advanced combos.
 
AE is good value for money, a new boxed copy costs only slightly more than upgrading from the online store. The same basics that skullgirls' tutorial teaches like crossups, mixups and blockstrings all apply in AE. You'll probably still get beaten a lot but I think its a more manageable game.
 
The only way to get better is just to keep banging your head against the wall and try to improve your game. I finally won a match tonight in 3rd strike, baited a rank 25 Ryu player to parry Sean's taunt full screen and then hit him with the hadouken super, once you finally get that one win its not so bad!
#35 Posted by MonkfishEsq (221 posts) -

Aye I do like to use Filia and that combo is pretty easy to remember. It's just trying to apply it to a human opponent while fumbling with the pad. Every time I've tried to use it againt someone they've managed to block in the middle of the strong. Accounting for lag online is a real bitch because there isn't any against the AI dummy.

#36 Posted by FulgoreSenpai (71 posts) -

Its a commitment to play fighting games. If you want to actually be good and be able to beat people online, its gonna take at least a year in that style like 2d or 3d and more in the specific game. After you've been playing for a WHILE, then when other fighting games come out you'll catch on quicker.

I'm telling you or anyone else right now, if you want to play fighting games and not have to practice so long just to get beat by people better than you constantly... Find other casual fighting game players and put them on your friends list or find some way to organize when y'all will play or something like that.

I guess in other words, I'm saying make fighting game friends.

#37 Posted by MonkfishEsq (221 posts) -

That would be nice to be honest! It feels like I'm really in the minority here being as new as I am when almost everyone playing this game has at least some past fighting game experience so they're already extremely familiar with the systems in place in Skullgirls. It's easier said than done though :P

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