The Man Behind Your Next Favorite PlayStation Game

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Posted by patrickklepek (2212 posts) -
Yoshida comes across as all formal in this picture, but he's down-to-earth in person.

It’s easy to like Shuhei Yoshida, the head of Sony Computer Entertainment Worldwide Studios, the position last held by another charismatic individual, Phil Harrison, who's now with Microsoft.

Yoshida is thoughtful, contemplative, surprisingly funny, and while he’s quick to defend and explain his company’s decisions, he comes across as an executive well aware of Sony’s past mistakes and keeping track of what’s happening in the world around him.

I’ve already filed stories based on my time with Yoshida at E3 (the lack of Vita games and 3D at the press conference, and whether The Last Guardian is coming out), encompassing only a few moments of our wide-ranging 30-minute conversation. I spoke with Yoshida just hours after Nintendo’s press conferences wrapped, an event largely seen as a swing and a miss for the company.

“To me, they [Nintendo] are continuing their very family friendly approach with [a] games for everyone style,” said Yoshida. “I see them, this time, more serious about a mature games or high-definition kinds of games, as well as network services. So it’s interesting how they will balance what they’ve been doing with something new for them that they seem to be trying to do this time.”

Not exactly a endorsement, but what do you expect from the competition?

Sony and Microsoft’s time to shine with glitzy new pieces of hardware seems destined for next year, while E3 2012 was focused on what could be the last major blitz of PlayStation 3 software, PlayStation Network, and the recently launched PS Vita. Yoshida already apologized for the lack of Vita software at the press conference, though had I already been to Sony’s booth, I would have asked him about the surprising absence of first-party games there, too.

Sony has an impressive stable of first-party developers, but many may be committed to early Orbis development, and unlike the past, Sony has not been able to count on third-parties to pick up the slack.

Yoshida admitted it’s been tougher to attract third-parties to Vita. There’s Facebook, iOS and other areas companies are committing resources to.

“It’s understandable when that happens,” he said. “It’s kind of hard for us to get as much support that we’d like to have from publishing partners.”

Liberation seems in the mold of PSP's God of War games--probably good, but why not on PS3?

In the past, Sony’s (and Nintendo's) marketshare in handhelds was much larger. In the past few years, that’s changed. The short-term solution appears to getting hands-on and working closely with third-parties that Sony’s had strong relationships with, a strategy that may have birthed Assassins Creed: Liberation.

Nintendo president Satoru Iwata used his keynote at the Game Developers Conference in 2011 to warn the industry about the dangers creators faced by the rise of social and mobile games. It’s not that social and mobile games were inherently bad, but Iwata worried small, cheap games could undermine everyone else.

Yoshida doesn’t share that opinion, or at least doesn’t appear to be as concerned.

“I always believe core gamers will never leave core gaming consoles because consoles are made for games,” he said. “We believe we understand what core gamers want, and it’s our role to provide the platform for game developers to really create deeper, immersive game experiences. We also appreciate people playing games on smartphones, as well. I play games on my smartphone, as well. Gamers play all kinds of games. I think the smartphone and tablet casual market will continue to grow, but what it’s doing is increasing the population of gamers in the world market.”

To that end, Sony’s established PS Mobile, formerly called PS Suite, a software development kit to get classic PlayStation games onto today’s modern mobile platforms. It’s partnering with HTC, but I couldn’t help but wonder if Sony would continue to ignore the elephant in the room named Apple.

Yoshida didn’t dismiss it outright, and blamed the lack of an iOS version on “technical difficulties.” He did admit it’s impossible to disregard the sheer number of devices Apple has sold, and that Sony is actively “experimenting” with applications to keep players connected to their PlayStation experiences.

“That’s one way in thinking to reach out to that casual audience who have found gaming for the first time,” he said.

Vita is just four months old, but the machine has not been a runaway success. There haven’t been many big games since its February launch here, and one of the chief reasons I’d been considering buying one for myself, Sound Shapes, is now coming to PS3, too. Yoshida didn’t make it sound like Sony was preparing to take the same drastic steps Nintendo did when 3DS stumbled out of the gate, where the company tossed out price cuts and free games.

Still, he was especially proud of announcing support for original PlayStation games, the most requested feature he’s heard from PS Vita owners on Twitter. (He’s really active on Twitter and responds often, by the way).

Since Square Enix doesn't feel like remaking Final Fantasy VII, maybe it's time to play it again.

Yoshida sympathized with players who simply find the $250 device too expensive right now, though.

“Our hardware group always work hard to try to cost reduce,” he said, “so that people who are waiting for PS Vita to eventually, in the future, become more affordable to them [can buy it].”

There’s no timetable for a possible price cut, only that it will happen “eventually.”

One way to extend the value proposition for Vita owners might be PlayStation Plus features, a no-brainer addition that made no appearance at E3. Yoshida actually laughed in a knowing sort of way when I asked him about it.

“We’ve been thinking, yeah,” he said.

Seconds later, a Sony representative made it clear there were no announcements at the moment, but Yoshida’s response should speak volumes. It’s unclear why PlayStation Plus for Vita wasn’t ready to go at E3, but count on it showing up eventually. Maybe Sony will make a bigger push at Tokyo Game Show.

Maybe we’ll see Orbis at TGS, too--I'm willing to bet a teaser. We didn’t touch on Sony’s next hardware very much, except in very broad strokes. I pointed out how it’s surprising to see Sony investing in new properties like Beyond and The Last of Us with the cycle winding down, but Yoshida saw that as an obvious move.

Even if you don't like Cage's games, you have to applaud Sony bankrolling his original ideas.

“It’s very important for us to have an opportunity to try something new for creative people,” he said, “while maintaining popular franchises so we can balance the business needs, as well as creative people’s needs.”

Though not explicitly said, it seems clear Yoshida’s group is deeply involved with Orbis. Vita was a “defining project” for the company, as it represented the first time the development side had a profound influence on hardware features. It was Yoshida’s job to connect the Japanese hardware developers with the right creative people from his departments, and make sure everyone’s needs were met.

“I moved to Japan from the US and every week, every day, I met with the hardware guys and joined the discussions and helped them communicated with the right studios,” he said.

He “absolutely” expected that relationship to continue going forward.

And forward may not be far off. Yoshida's tasked with the mammoth duty of managing Sony's development portfolio as several internal and external transitions are underway. We'll see how those ideas pan out in the years ahead.

#1 Posted by patrickklepek (2212 posts) -
Yoshida comes across as all formal in this picture, but he's down-to-earth in person.

It’s easy to like Shuhei Yoshida, the head of Sony Computer Entertainment Worldwide Studios, the position last held by another charismatic individual, Phil Harrison, who's now with Microsoft.

Yoshida is thoughtful, contemplative, surprisingly funny, and while he’s quick to defend and explain his company’s decisions, he comes across as an executive well aware of Sony’s past mistakes and keeping track of what’s happening in the world around him.

I’ve already filed stories based on my time with Yoshida at E3 (the lack of Vita games and 3D at the press conference, and whether The Last Guardian is coming out), encompassing only a few moments of our wide-ranging 30-minute conversation. I spoke with Yoshida just hours after Nintendo’s press conferences wrapped, an event largely seen as a swing and a miss for the company.

“To me, they [Nintendo] are continuing their very family friendly approach with [a] games for everyone style,” said Yoshida. “I see them, this time, more serious about a mature games or high-definition kinds of games, as well as network services. So it’s interesting how they will balance what they’ve been doing with something new for them that they seem to be trying to do this time.”

Not exactly a endorsement, but what do you expect from the competition?

Sony and Microsoft’s time to shine with glitzy new pieces of hardware seems destined for next year, while E3 2012 was focused on what could be the last major blitz of PlayStation 3 software, PlayStation Network, and the recently launched PS Vita. Yoshida already apologized for the lack of Vita software at the press conference, though had I already been to Sony’s booth, I would have asked him about the surprising absence of first-party games there, too.

Sony has an impressive stable of first-party developers, but many may be committed to early Orbis development, and unlike the past, Sony has not been able to count on third-parties to pick up the slack.

Yoshida admitted it’s been tougher to attract third-parties to Vita. There’s Facebook, iOS and other areas companies are committing resources to.

“It’s understandable when that happens,” he said. “It’s kind of hard for us to get as much support that we’d like to have from publishing partners.”

Liberation seems in the mold of PSP's God of War games--probably good, but why not on PS3?

In the past, Sony’s (and Nintendo's) marketshare in handhelds was much larger. In the past few years, that’s changed. The short-term solution appears to getting hands-on and working closely with third-parties that Sony’s had strong relationships with, a strategy that may have birthed Assassins Creed: Liberation.

Nintendo president Satoru Iwata used his keynote at the Game Developers Conference in 2011 to warn the industry about the dangers creators faced by the rise of social and mobile games. It’s not that social and mobile games were inherently bad, but Iwata worried small, cheap games could undermine everyone else.

Yoshida doesn’t share that opinion, or at least doesn’t appear to be as concerned.

“I always believe core gamers will never leave core gaming consoles because consoles are made for games,” he said. “We believe we understand what core gamers want, and it’s our role to provide the platform for game developers to really create deeper, immersive game experiences. We also appreciate people playing games on smartphones, as well. I play games on my smartphone, as well. Gamers play all kinds of games. I think the smartphone and tablet casual market will continue to grow, but what it’s doing is increasing the population of gamers in the world market.”

To that end, Sony’s established PS Mobile, formerly called PS Suite, a software development kit to get classic PlayStation games onto today’s modern mobile platforms. It’s partnering with HTC, but I couldn’t help but wonder if Sony would continue to ignore the elephant in the room named Apple.

Yoshida didn’t dismiss it outright, and blamed the lack of an iOS version on “technical difficulties.” He did admit it’s impossible to disregard the sheer number of devices Apple has sold, and that Sony is actively “experimenting” with applications to keep players connected to their PlayStation experiences.

“That’s one way in thinking to reach out to that casual audience who have found gaming for the first time,” he said.

Vita is just four months old, but the machine has not been a runaway success. There haven’t been many big games since its February launch here, and one of the chief reasons I’d been considering buying one for myself, Sound Shapes, is now coming to PS3, too. Yoshida didn’t make it sound like Sony was preparing to take the same drastic steps Nintendo did when 3DS stumbled out of the gate, where the company tossed out price cuts and free games.

Still, he was especially proud of announcing support for original PlayStation games, the most requested feature he’s heard from PS Vita owners on Twitter. (He’s really active on Twitter and responds often, by the way).

Since Square Enix doesn't feel like remaking Final Fantasy VII, maybe it's time to play it again.

Yoshida sympathized with players who simply find the $250 device too expensive right now, though.

“Our hardware group always work hard to try to cost reduce,” he said, “so that people who are waiting for PS Vita to eventually, in the future, become more affordable to them [can buy it].”

There’s no timetable for a possible price cut, only that it will happen “eventually.”

One way to extend the value proposition for Vita owners might be PlayStation Plus features, a no-brainer addition that made no appearance at E3. Yoshida actually laughed in a knowing sort of way when I asked him about it.

“We’ve been thinking, yeah,” he said.

Seconds later, a Sony representative made it clear there were no announcements at the moment, but Yoshida’s response should speak volumes. It’s unclear why PlayStation Plus for Vita wasn’t ready to go at E3, but count on it showing up eventually. Maybe Sony will make a bigger push at Tokyo Game Show.

Maybe we’ll see Orbis at TGS, too--I'm willing to bet a teaser. We didn’t touch on Sony’s next hardware very much, except in very broad strokes. I pointed out how it’s surprising to see Sony investing in new properties like Beyond and The Last of Us with the cycle winding down, but Yoshida saw that as an obvious move.

Even if you don't like Cage's games, you have to applaud Sony bankrolling his original ideas.

“It’s very important for us to have an opportunity to try something new for creative people,” he said, “while maintaining popular franchises so we can balance the business needs, as well as creative people’s needs.”

Though not explicitly said, it seems clear Yoshida’s group is deeply involved with Orbis. Vita was a “defining project” for the company, as it represented the first time the development side had a profound influence on hardware features. It was Yoshida’s job to connect the Japanese hardware developers with the right creative people from his departments, and make sure everyone’s needs were met.

“I moved to Japan from the US and every week, every day, I met with the hardware guys and joined the discussions and helped them communicated with the right studios,” he said.

He “absolutely” expected that relationship to continue going forward.

And forward may not be far off. Yoshida's tasked with the mammoth duty of managing Sony's development portfolio as several internal and external transitions are underway. We'll see how those ideas pan out in the years ahead.

#2 Edited by samcroft90 (99 posts) -

cool, nice to see that the playstation plus stuff will be extending to vita owners.

#3 Posted by impartialgecko (1686 posts) -

I'm down with Sony catering for me and my exclusively game-related interests. I's prefer a game box rather than a media box when the PS4 rolls around.

#4 Posted by Th3_James (2579 posts) -

Uncharted 2 and Heavy Rain were the last games I played on PS3. I might have to turn it on once again for The Last of Us, but idk if I even want to bother despite how cool it looks.

#5 Posted by samcroft90 (99 posts) -

@Th3_James said:

Uncharted 2 and Heavy Rain were the last games I played on PS3. I might have to turn it on once again for The Last of Us, but idk if I even want to bother despite how cool it looks.

I know lots of people who use their PS3 as a 'first party exclusive box' and as a result go for months without using it.

#6 Posted by Morningstar (2240 posts) -

Hope he can give us more quality vita games.

#7 Edited by Binarynova (150 posts) -

Liberation seems in the mold of PSP's God of War games--probably good, but why not on PS3?

There haven’t been many big games since [the Vita's] February launch here, and one of the chief reasons I’d been considering buying one for myself, Sound Shapes, is now coming to PS3, too.

/facepalm

Well, now I'm confused. Which is it? Should Sony market great gaming experiences exclusively for the Vita or do you want to play them on the PS3?

#8 Posted by mabber36 (129 posts) -

"Even if you don't like Cage's games, you have to applaud Sony bankrolling his original ideas."

why do i have to applaud sony for wasting money funding non-games when they could be funding games?

#9 Posted by WJist (308 posts) -

Sony's impressive back catalog of PS1 and PS2 titles is always worth revisiting and I hope that those games come back fully for Vita and Orbis. But....it would seem odd to do the backwards compatibility with PS3 games on their next system.

It's too bad because I like their direction as a game company and their willingness to invest in new ideas and tech is something that should be lauded while the competition is crapping up their dashboard and releasing mini-game collections.

#10 Posted by onan (1286 posts) -

I don't know about a price cut for the Vita, but if they'd just announce a price cut for the memory sticks, or a Micro SDHC adapter, I'd buy one in a heartbeat. They've already validated a purchase of one based on my existing library of digital PSP and PS1 games (A collection not insubstantially bolstered by PS Plus, either). The problem is their focus on digital has never ever been in line with the affordability of storage for their portable systems. That's what needs to change for me to get on board with the Vita.

#11 Posted by Th3_James (2579 posts) -

@samcroft90 said:

@Th3_James said:

Uncharted 2 and Heavy Rain were the last games I played on PS3. I might have to turn it on once again for The Last of Us, but idk if I even want to bother despite how cool it looks.

I know lots of people who use their PS3 as a 'first party exclusive box' and as a result go for months without using it.

I bought my 60GB console shortly after launch and haven't used it much even after all these years. As great as the few exclusive games were on ps3 that I actually played, I don't know if I am going to own all consoles in this coming generation of systems like I did with this one.

#12 Posted by GozerTC (458 posts) -

Honestly I'm not surprised third parties are ignoring or slow to adopt the Vita. Didn't many of us point out that dedicated portable gaming systems are less viable now that we have so many multipurpose devices that are "good enough" for on the go?

Also a little grammar mistake:

the sheer number of devices Apple has told,

That said it's interesting to hear his take on Nintendo and the industry at large.

#13 Posted by BoFooQ (752 posts) -

“It’s very important for us to have an opportunity to try something new for creative people,

I like the idea of sony saying we need to get ready for PS4 so whatever crazy project you have go ahead and get it out on PS3 so we have something to fill line up. I can only imagine new hardware will cost more to make games, so if you have an off the wall game its better to put it out now than try and wait. Personally I'm not sure what sony could put into PS4 to make me rush out to get right away. Like when I got my PS3, I'll probably wait a year or two, maybe first price drop till upgrading.

#14 Posted by Lava (672 posts) -

I'm excited for Playstation Plus to extend to the Vita, even some free Mini games would lead me to play with that system more.

#15 Posted by RandomAtom (88 posts) -

Great article, very excited for the future of the Vita...but still worried.

#16 Posted by NocturnusFatalis (76 posts) -

Maybe it's all just corporate rhetoric BS keeping in mind the site he's interviewing for, but..

I cannot help but take comfort in the fact that someone says they wish to preserve the place for a hardcore game box in the future. And that their sites are more set on more mature games (T-M range). I hope they've learned a few lessons (launching too late, launching too expensive, etc). PS2 was all I bought two gens ago, because that's all one needed. A PS3 was my first HD platform, and was going to be my only one until it was clear things weren't going to work out the same this gen, and I got other stuff (360, PSP, gaming laptop, gaming desktop, then Vita). I'm committed to getting the PS4 first next gen, but I'll still be getting other stuff too. Hopefully, they keep their eye on us gamers who want more than our smartphones.

#17 Posted by Xeirus (1370 posts) -

@Th3_James said:

@samcroft90 said:

@Th3_James said:

Uncharted 2 and Heavy Rain were the last games I played on PS3. I might have to turn it on once again for The Last of Us, but idk if I even want to bother despite how cool it looks.

I know lots of people who use their PS3 as a 'first party exclusive box' and as a result go for months without using it.

I bought my 60GB console shortly after launch and haven't used it much even after all these years. As great as the few exclusive games were on ps3 that I actually played, I don't know if I am going to own all consoles in this coming generation of systems like I did with this one.

Exactly how I feel. I have every console right now, but have been gaming on my PC for the last couple of years and I don't miss the consoles much at all. It's really sort of depressing.

The last games I played were Journey and Trials Evo, before that? I don't even remember :/

#18 Posted by whatisdelicious (1288 posts) -

"Liberation seems in the mold of PSP's God of War games--probably good, but why not on PS3?"

I'm getting pretty tired of that question, actually. Why not on PS3? Because it's on Vita. Assassin's Creed III is on PS3. Liberation is on Vita. It looks like a really awesome handheld experience. It's pretty mind-blowing that that's the kind of game we can have in the palm of our hands now, yet everyone complains about it. People just need to come to grips that not every handheld game is meant to be played in 5-minute chunks on a bus ride. Some want you to sit down, put in some headphones, and get truly immersed. What's wrong with that goal? Vita has bite-sized games too. That's the beauty of it.

#19 Posted by emergency (1190 posts) -

I love how active he is on twitter even with just small 1-sentence replies. I hope that PS+ members get amazing VITA features. I think it'd be a great way to get more PS+ subscribers & reward the VITA owners with something for being "early adopters" essentially.

#20 Posted by jasonefmonk (346 posts) -

It would be really disappointing to see third parties shy away from Sony's next system, I've so many memorable experiences playing things like Journey and MGS4 that I couldn't have anywhere else. I've never owned an Xbox and don't plan to, unless they change the way their business works; the "cost of living" in the Microsoft ecosystem is way too high. I have a Wii but it's just a Virtual Console machine at this point in it's life. PlayStation is the only place that's fulfilled my gaming needs.

#21 Posted by Mockduck (20 posts) -

Patrick, great interview and read. Honestly, you're one of the best reporters I read regularly in the gaming media right now, keep up the good work!

#22 Posted by Deathpooky (1443 posts) -

You have to think the more that they focus on getting properties on mobile phones, the more they're going to wonder why they're making their own mobile game platforms that continue to fail when they could just make their own quality games from the ground up for smartphones.

#23 Posted by AuthenticM (3803 posts) -

@samcroft90 said:

@Th3_James said:

Uncharted 2 and Heavy Rain were the last games I played on PS3. I might have to turn it on once again for The Last of Us, but idk if I even want to bother despite how cool it looks.

I know lots of people who use their PS3 as a 'first party exclusive box' and as a result go for months without using it.

I do the same with Nintendo devices, and I go for years without using it. I don't regret my purchase though; their first-party stuff it stellar.

#24 Posted by patrickklepek (2212 posts) -

@whatisdelicious said:

"Liberation seems in the mold of PSP's God of War games--probably good, but why not on PS3?"

I'm getting pretty tired of that question, actually. Why not on PS3? Because it's on Vita. Assassin's Creed III is on PS3. Liberation is on Vita. It looks like a really awesome handheld experience. It's pretty mind-blowing that that's the kind of game we can have in the palm of our hands now, yet everyone complains about it. People just need to come to grips that not every handheld game is meant to be played in 5-minute chunks on a bus ride. Some want you to sit down, put in some headphones, and get truly immersed. What's wrong with that goal? Vita has bite-sized games too. That's the beauty of it.

Here's my problem with it: I know the A team isn't working on it, I know any new features are being saved for the console versions, and if I'm going to play a spin-off on a handheld, I'd much rather it actually be a spin-off mechanically, too, rather than just a watered down version of the much more impressive game on my HDTV.

#26 Posted by killacam (1278 posts) -

@jasonefmonk said:

It would be really disappointing to see third parties shy away from Sony's next system, I've so many memorable experiences playing things like Journey and MGS4 that I couldn't have anywhere else. I've never owned an Xbox and don't plan to, unless they change the way their business works; the "cost of living" in the Microsoft ecosystem is way too high. I have a Wii but it's just a Virtual Console machine at this point in it's life. PlayStation is the only place that's fulfilled my gaming needs.

if anything, the ps4 is going to be a haven for developers that want to make deep gaming experiences, considering how microsoft clearly has their interests elsewhere, and wii u's affinity towards family-friendly gaming and soon-to-be-dated tech.

#27 Posted by Phatmac (5727 posts) -

Loving my PS3 as it keeps delivering solid exclusives and a ton of sweet PS plus stuff. Luckily I avoided buying a Vita since I had a feeling that it wouldn't do that well at all without games. I love Sony, but I don't think the Vita will make a comeback anytime soon. :/

#28 Posted by Enigma777 (6058 posts) -

My advice: don't buy a Vita.

#29 Edited by Phished0ne (2539 posts) -

@mabber36 said:

"Even if you don't like Cage's games, you have to applaud Sony bankrolling his original ideas."

why do i have to applaud sony for wasting money funding non-games when they could be funding games?

Sony is slowly but surely positioning themselves as the "Indie" platform. Even though it is Xbox that has the "Indie Marketplace", it is full mostly of tripe. Cash grab rehashes of old commodore 64, and atari games. But Sony is being a curator, the videogames Miramax if you will. They are allowing auteur creators to come in and make their vision. Sony isnt worried about the possible misses, they are continuing to let these people do what they want. Im sure a lot of indies are noticing, and as long as the Orbis is easier to develop for than the PS3. I think the development community will take notice, and the Sony platform will have a strong foothold in the crazy ass indie game department. Imagine what happens when the next Braid, Limbo, Fez, or Insanely Twisted Shadow Planet is an Orbis exclusive. The release of Cage's games, arent even necessarily about the games themselves, those games are messages to other developers.

"This is the Sony Experience"

"Heres what you can make on playstation"

"we'll let you create your vision"

#30 Posted by StriderNo9 (1149 posts) -

Great read, I like this guy. Gives me confidence that Sony understands the position they're in and are doing what they know how to keep moving forward.

#31 Posted by Paindamnation (815 posts) -

This is great and All, but it's tuesday. Where I love Mondays?

#32 Posted by CharlesAlanRatliff (5463 posts) -

Yoshida is an awesome dude.

That is all.

#33 Posted by gtg12 (67 posts) -

The guy seems pretty cool.

#35 Posted by Gunslinger0130 (240 posts) -
@samcroft90 I'm one of these people, I picked it up a whole ago solely for the exclusives (which are excellent by the way). If a title is cross platform I always play it on the Xbox, you just can't beat the party system on that console. Oh, Netflix is also way better on the ps3, I use it for that purpose everyday.
#36 Posted by EverydayOdyssey (172 posts) -

Interesting article. Having purchased a Vita, I hope it is not dead in the water. Sony has to keep that baby afloat.

#37 Posted by BradGrenz (60 posts) -

It's amusing that people complain they don't want a bunch of big time console experiences on the Vita, but when Sony shows a ton of crazy, cool indie download titles for it at E3, all anyone wants to know is "where are the big first party retail games?".

#38 Posted by metalsnakezero (2342 posts) -

@whatisdelicious: That's true. Persona 4 Golden will be coming out soon and that is a 60+ hour right there. Plus you can bring it with you, giving you more time to finish it when you're away from home. I think some video game journalist just over look those larger portable games since they see small game work better on a small platform, while it is true.

#39 Posted by Bartz (88 posts) -

Patrick, I'm not trying to be rude, because I really like your articles... But proofreading is your friend. Just have one of the other editors read through it really quick and fix the mistakes. I'm afraid all the typos bring your professionalism down.

#40 Posted by csl316 (9444 posts) -

Yoshida was just on IGN's Podcast Beyond. Truly a cool dude.

#41 Posted by umdesch4 (771 posts) -

@Phished0ne said:

But Sony is being a curator, the videogames Miramax if you will.

[and a bunch of other insightful stuff]

Well said, and I agree. I've been so badly burned over the years by Sony that I haven't bought anything from them in over a decade, and actively boycotted them in 2005but I might be willing to jump cautiously into the next generation if they continue building in this direction.

#42 Posted by spilledmilkfactory (1899 posts) -

His response about allowing creative people to flourish really sums up the reason that I tend to prefer Sony games to those of Microsoft or Nintendo. We wouldn't see half the stuff we get on the PS3 on those other platforms

#43 Posted by PXAbstraction (352 posts) -

@patrickklepek said:

Here's my problem with it: I know the A team isn't working on it, I know any new features are being saved for the console versions, and if I'm going to play a spin-off on a handheld, I'd much rather it actually be a spin-off mechanically, too, rather than just a watered down version of the much more impressive game on my HDTV.

Questions though. I don't intend to be snarky here, I'm genuinely asking:

1. The core Assassin's Creed III team isn't working on it. How does that automatically make it a sub-A team? Do we even know what studio is developing this? I don't understand why a game being on a handheld platform automatically means it must be a weaker team that's on it.

2. How do we know they're holding back new features? Has anyone actually played the Vita title yet? Do we know if they've found potentially innovative ways to use the touch controls and gyro? Many are saying Ubisoft did neat stuff with the WiiU, why not the Vita?

3. How do we know this is just a watered down console game or for that matter, a spin-off at all? From what I understand, it's a side story with a different character. Sure it takes place in a different time period but does that automatically mean the story will be less meaningful and significant? How can we know this when we haven't seen it yet?

I ask these questions because the default response from many (not just Patrick) seems to be to automatically dismiss any predominantly console series that gets a handheld iteration as sub-par, even before playing it or seeing it to any real degree. Was Rayman Origins on Vita sub-par? Not quite the same thing but it was a handheld version of a console game and was fantastic. I just don't understand the rush to write-off something unseen yet. There's been a lot of crappy movie games too but there have also been good ones, meaning that just because movie games exist doesn't mean they're all bad. That's like saying all iPhone games are bad just because the app store is mostly filled with crap. It's simply not true and kind of unfair to paint every unreleased iPhone title with that brush by default. Have you seen anything more of Liberation that indicates it will be substantially worse?

#44 Edited by Dan_CiTi (3513 posts) -

They need to start doing stuff like the Killzone strategy game on PSP again (funny enough also subtitled Liberation). Take an existing franchise, and do a different genre REALLY well on a different platform with different characters and play around with settings a the time period a little. Give me a kick ass gorgeous 2D or cel-shaded 3D Assassin's Creed Metroidvania or even 2D action game. I mean Liberation sounds great, but it would be cool if they tried more experimental and different things on these platforms. Like fuck make a new Vib Ribbon that uses MP3s on your Vita or do some weird awesome rhythm / music game with existing Sony characters and music.

#45 Posted by Vegetable_Side_Dish (1733 posts) -

Shuhei's twitter feed is pretty great. He seems like a cool guy. 

#46 Posted by Th3_James (2579 posts) -

@Xeirus said:

@Th3_James said:

@samcroft90 said:

@Th3_James said:

Uncharted 2 and Heavy Rain were the last games I played on PS3. I might have to turn it on once again for The Last of Us, but idk if I even want to bother despite how cool it looks.

I know lots of people who use their PS3 as a 'first party exclusive box' and as a result go for months without using it.

I bought my 60GB console shortly after launch and haven't used it much even after all these years. As great as the few exclusive games were on ps3 that I actually played, I don't know if I am going to own all consoles in this coming generation of systems like I did with this one.

Exactly how I feel. I have every console right now, but have been gaming on my PC for the last couple of years and I don't miss the consoles much at all. It's really sort of depressing.

The last games I played were Journey and Trials Evo, before that? I don't even remember :/

My steam library of almost 200 games can keep me entertained for more time than any console could.

#47 Posted by EndlessLotus (108 posts) -

So, he's the next Kojima?

#48 Edited by Shtinky (676 posts) -

Funny, I was only thinking to myself, recently, how cool and down to earth this guy seems. And now you have an article about him, it kinda re-affirms my opinion :)

#49 Posted by radion_null (160 posts) -

Good reading. As I read the section on the Vita I reflected on pricing. If Vita is being solely compared to the #DS, and the 4th gen 8GB iPod, then yes it is more expensive. If compared to an unsubsidiced iPhone, or android phone or to with 7"-10.1' Tablets, I think the Vita is reasonably priced. Wih regards to the rest, I think Sony has a lot to work on to at least get to second place.

#50 Posted by Chroma_Auron (112 posts) -

He seams less like a jerk then Phil Harris but this interview was more of a cooperate spreadsheet of quotes brown nosing. You can do better then this.

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