Thoughts: The Impossible Game

Posted by Coreymw (203 posts) -

The title says it all. The game is a mix of simplistic game play and fantastic, if not misleading music all wrapped up in a seemingly simple game. You play as a block cautiously hurdling triangles and other menacing blocks to the end of each level. It sounds simple enough, and you would be wrong to think so.

Within the first 30 seconds the game teaches you to bounce (tap A) to the beat in order to leap over obstacles. In those first few moments you think maybe this is a rhythm game and all you need to do is follow the beat. Again, you would be wrong. Just as soon as you get used to tapping to the beat the game changes. Bounding blocks no longer matches the rhythm of the music.

This marks the first thing I love about the game. It teaches a lesson, and then forcibly makes you forget about said lesson. You’re given a mishmash of follow the beat button taps only to, and at random, be forced to forget about the music and just jump. It’s hard to do because the music is infectious. There’s a prominent base line that begs you to mash that button. Not unlike the urge to tap your feet to a good song.

At times I get a feeling of satisfaction from seeing my block bounce along to the beat of the music, hurling myself over and off of other blocks. Its not unlike watching a great action scene that’s been synced with a great soundtrack. It almost feels like you’re creating a work of art, bounding over and off of blocks to the beat of the drum. Maybe it’s because it takes so much patience and practice to master (I use that term loosely). When it finally clicks you appreciate the time taken to perfect the little nuances in timing jumps either with the beat of the music or the rhythm some of the spacing in each section requires.

One other thing I enjoy about the game is that it tracks your attempts right on the screen. It works as both a reminder of your lack of skills and as a friend urging you on. My roommate and I attempted well over 600 times in half an hour to complete just the first level. We’ve yet to complete the first level and if asked, I would estimate I’m well over 1500 attempts.

The fact that I haven’t given up on the game speaks, I think, to the addictive simplistic nature of it all. There’s nothing hard about the game so far as mechanics go, you are as good as your skills allow you to be. There are no cheap tricks employed to impede your progress, you never feel cheated. When you fail you see exactly why you failed and are able to see what it is you need to do in order to proceed. A tool I wish more games would employ.

#1 Posted by Coreymw (203 posts) -

The title says it all. The game is a mix of simplistic game play and fantastic, if not misleading music all wrapped up in a seemingly simple game. You play as a block cautiously hurdling triangles and other menacing blocks to the end of each level. It sounds simple enough, and you would be wrong to think so.

Within the first 30 seconds the game teaches you to bounce (tap A) to the beat in order to leap over obstacles. In those first few moments you think maybe this is a rhythm game and all you need to do is follow the beat. Again, you would be wrong. Just as soon as you get used to tapping to the beat the game changes. Bounding blocks no longer matches the rhythm of the music.

This marks the first thing I love about the game. It teaches a lesson, and then forcibly makes you forget about said lesson. You’re given a mishmash of follow the beat button taps only to, and at random, be forced to forget about the music and just jump. It’s hard to do because the music is infectious. There’s a prominent base line that begs you to mash that button. Not unlike the urge to tap your feet to a good song.

At times I get a feeling of satisfaction from seeing my block bounce along to the beat of the music, hurling myself over and off of other blocks. Its not unlike watching a great action scene that’s been synced with a great soundtrack. It almost feels like you’re creating a work of art, bounding over and off of blocks to the beat of the drum. Maybe it’s because it takes so much patience and practice to master (I use that term loosely). When it finally clicks you appreciate the time taken to perfect the little nuances in timing jumps either with the beat of the music or the rhythm some of the spacing in each section requires.

One other thing I enjoy about the game is that it tracks your attempts right on the screen. It works as both a reminder of your lack of skills and as a friend urging you on. My roommate and I attempted well over 600 times in half an hour to complete just the first level. We’ve yet to complete the first level and if asked, I would estimate I’m well over 1500 attempts.

The fact that I haven’t given up on the game speaks, I think, to the addictive simplistic nature of it all. There’s nothing hard about the game so far as mechanics go, you are as good as your skills allow you to be. There are no cheap tricks employed to impede your progress, you never feel cheated. When you fail you see exactly why you failed and are able to see what it is you need to do in order to proceed. A tool I wish more games would employ.

#2 Posted by believer258 (12185 posts) -

I have it on my 360, though I haven't played it in quite a long time. It is, indeed, fun, but it lives up to its namesake too.

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