How should this properly be said?

#1 Posted by FinalDasa (2067 posts) -

If you watched either the QL or the podcast you will know pronouncing this game's name isn't as easy as it should be.

So let the debate begin! Theater rhythm? or Theat rhythm?

#2 Posted by Scrawnto (2467 posts) -

I go with Thea-trhythm.

#3 Posted by Maystack (902 posts) -

I just say Theatre Rhythm. I don't care how it's spelled, that's the easiest way to say it.

#4 Posted by nukeybukey (14 posts) -

Im not exactly sure how its pronounced I usually pronounce things the way I hear the majority of people say it

#5 Posted by Animasta (14728 posts) -

that final fantasy rhythm game

#6 Posted by HellBrendy (994 posts) -

@Animasta said:

that final fantasy rhythm game

This. Is. What. I. Was. Just. About. To. Write.

#7 Posted by moffattron9000 (353 posts) -

pronounce the Th at the start of the name as you would pronounce F and it sounds like feat-rhythm. So far I've got noting better so i'm sticking with this pronunciation. Also fuck you tumblr for making stupid pronunciations like this OK.

#8 Posted by NapTimeSleeper (323 posts) -

I pronounce it The-at-rhythm.

#9 Edited by MrKlorox (11209 posts) -

Theatre-rhythm and theat-rhytm are basically the same thing. The main difference is how you pronounce the "at" part of "theat". Either you pronounce it "at" as in "theatrical" or "ate" as in theatre/theater. 
 
People voting "theatre-rhythm" aren't leaving a pause between the words when saying it. It's more like "theatre-ythm".
 
edit: I'm Texan. Is it weird that I use the British spelling of the word?

#10 Posted by Ravenlight (8011 posts) -

I'm onboard with the R rolling pronunciation.

Thea-trrrrrrrythm

#11 Posted by alternate (2720 posts) -

Theatre - Rhythm.

Americans are just getting confused because they spell "Theater" wrongly.

#12 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -

Tietra-Rhythm.

#13 Posted by Turambar (6898 posts) -
@alternate said:

Theatre - Rhythm.

Americans are just getting confused because they spell "Theater" wrongly.

Actually interesting note: the game itself has a Theatre mode, so yeah.
#14 Edited by CaptRoFL (77 posts) -

Featrerhthm

Theat. Final Fantasty

#15 Posted by MrKlorox (11209 posts) -
@alternate said:

Theatre - Rhythm.

Americans are just getting confused because they spell "Theater" wrongly.

Pretty sure it's just Jeff.
#16 Posted by Irvandus (2898 posts) -

Thyl-thy-thylyi-fyliu-reah-rhythm-Finel-Faintasi.

#17 Posted by alternate (2720 posts) -

@MrKlorox said:

@alternate said:

Theatre - Rhythm.

Americans are just getting confused because they spell "Theater" wrongly.

Pretty sure it's just Jeff.

Actually googling it - seems Americans are not even consistent. They will watch a movie at a Theater but a play at the Theatre. Some times they go see Theatre performed at the local Theater :D

#18 Posted by RollingZeppelin (2112 posts) -

@MrKlorox said:

TPeople voting "theatre-rhythm" aren't leaving a pause between the words when saying it. It's more like "theatre-ythm".

That's how I would say it, but I shall never utter these words aloud,

#19 Posted by RenMcKormack (1074 posts) -

Gitarroo-Man: Final Fantasy

#20 Posted by Grillbar (1913 posts) -

i would properly say it likeTheat rhythm so very small pause between the 2 words

#21 Posted by Turambar (6898 posts) -
@alternate said:

@MrKlorox said:

@alternate said:

Theatre - Rhythm.

Americans are just getting confused because they spell "Theater" wrongly.

Pretty sure it's just Jeff.

Actually googling it - seems Americans are not even consistent. They will watch a movie at a Theater but a play at the Theatre. Some times they go see Theatre performed at the local Theater :D

Are you sure Theatre isn't just being used as a proper noun in those cases?
#22 Posted by Hunter5024 (5976 posts) -

@alternate said:

Actually googling it - seems Americans are not even consistent. They will watch a movie at a Theater but a play at the Theatre. Some times they go see Theatre performed at the local Theater :D

In my opinion people who spell it "Theatre" over here in america tend to be the snobby types who only spell it that way because it's classic and makes them look cultured or something. I spell it theater because its more phonetically accurate.

#23 Posted by Fearbeard (834 posts) -

@Maystack said:

I just say Theatre Rhythm. I don't care how it's spelled, that's the easiest way to say it.

This

I don't know or care if it's right or wrong. I don't ever see myself pronouncing it any other way.

#24 Posted by Levio (1786 posts) -

@alternate said:

@MrKlorox said:

@alternate said:

Theatre - Rhythm.

Americans are just getting confused because they spell "Theater" wrongly.

Pretty sure it's just Jeff.

Actually googling it - seems Americans are not even consistent. They will watch a movie at a Theater but a play at the Theatre. Some times they go see Theatre performed at the local Theater :D

Us Americans don't care which way the word is spelled since the pronunciation and the word length are the same either way

#25 Posted by Contrarian (1143 posts) -

@Hunter5024 said:

@alternate said:

Actually googling it - seems Americans are not even consistent. They will watch a movie at a Theater but a play at the Theatre. Some times they go see Theatre performed at the local Theater :D

In my opinion people who spell it "Theatre" over here in america tend to be the snobby types who only spell it that way because it's classic and makes them look cultured or something. I spell it theater because its more phonetically accurate.

No. it isn't phonetically correct. Perhaps it is for you, but that is your accent only. "re" in the rest of the English world is called the "schwa" sounds like "uh" (the schwa sound being the "e" and the "r" not being sounded at all). Americans incorrectly emphasise the "er" sound which was never in the word to begin with. Saying it is phonetically correct would be like me being Irish and spelling the word "third" as "terd" because that is how I say it. Americans invented new spelling based entirely on their own accent.

#26 Posted by MrKlorox (11209 posts) -

As if adding R sounds to words that don't have them isn't confusing enough, you make sure to not pronounce the R's that are there.

#27 Posted by Jumbs (272 posts) -

"That Final Fantasy rhythm game with the dumb name"

#28 Posted by mscupcakes (612 posts) -

I'm pretty sure it's T-Rimz.

#29 Posted by Pazy (2601 posts) -

Final Fantasy Rhythm Game

If I have to say the silly title then its probabaly Theata-Rhythm.

#30 Posted by Hunter5024 (5976 posts) -

@Contrarian said:

No. it isn't phonetically correct. Perhaps it is for you, but that is your accent only. "re" in the rest of the English world is called the "schwa" sounds like "uh" (the schwa sound being the "e" and the "r" not being sounded at all). Americans incorrectly emphasise the "er" sound which was never in the word to begin with. Saying it is phonetically correct would be like me being Irish and spelling the word "third" as "terd" because that is how I say it. Americans invented new spelling based entirely on their own accent.

This isn't about accents its about spelling. Phonetically you would never use the letter combo of "re" to make the schwa regardless of your accent you would use "uh", so yes it is more phonetically accurate than the "Theatre" spelling. "Thee-uh-ter" is a closer spelling to Theater and Theatre then "Thee-uh-tuh" is. Your gripe seems to be more with the fact that the word itself changed pronunciations over here, and that everyone in America is pronouncing it incorrectly, but that's actually the spelling of Theatre's fault. Language is always changing, and if people start pronouncing an R that they aren't supposed to then maybe that R shouldn't be there in the first place; which is why I'm defending the more phonetic spelling to begin with.

#31 Posted by Bollard (5868 posts) -

'How should this be said properly.'
There we go fixed that for ya :D

#32 Posted by Contrarian (1143 posts) -

@Hunter5024 said:

@Contrarian said:

No. it isn't phonetically correct. Perhaps it is for you, but that is your accent only. "re" in the rest of the English world is called the "schwa" sounds like "uh" (the schwa sound being the "e" and the "r" not being sounded at all). Americans incorrectly emphasise the "er" sound which was never in the word to begin with. Saying it is phonetically correct would be like me being Irish and spelling the word "third" as "terd" because that is how I say it. Americans invented new spelling based entirely on their own accent.

This isn't about accents its about spelling. Phonetically you would never use the letter combo of "re" to make the schwa regardless of your accent you would use "uh", so yes it is more phonetically accurate than the "Theatre" spelling. "Thee-uh-ter" is a closer spelling to Theater and Theatre then "Thee-uh-tuh" is. Your gripe seems to be more with the fact that the word itself changed pronunciations over here, and that everyone in America is pronouncing it incorrectly, but that's actually the spelling of Theatre's fault. Language is always changing, and if people start pronouncing an R that they aren't supposed to then maybe that R shouldn't be there in the first place; which is why I'm defending the more phonetic spelling to begin with.

No, it is about the way it is pronounced and changing the spelling to accommodate that. Phonetics doesn't work and should never be used in English. The phonetic Americans use is the "er". Theatre pronounced by some Americans is "thee-ay-ter", not "thee-uh-ter". I barely know were to begin with your post.

The schwa sound, or "uh" is the non emphasised vowel, in the case of theatre, the last e and it eliminates the sound of the r. We, non-Americans, learn and understand the rules of proper English and apply them with little difficulty. Now, I don't care that Americans spell it 'wrong' or that they emphasise the "er", as long as I don't see it outside of the US. I am merely pointing out that you say it is phonetically correct to spell it theater, when phonetics is based entirely on accent. As accents vary widely across the English speaking world, you can't say the American way of spelling it is 'more' correct. The only true and correct way to say it and spell it is as it was by the English. Everything that varies from that is simply accepted pronounciation and spelling outside of the UK.

The person we have to blame in all of this is Noah Webster. Noah didn't like many of the rules of proper English. He took out the "u" in colour, replaced the 'c' with an 's' in defence, took out the 'ue' in dialogue, dropped the extra 'l' in traveller and replaced the 's' with 'z' in criticise. He even tried to drop the 'ue' on tongue - tung! The point of this fact is that Americans intentionally changed spelling because they thought that their children would learn better if they simplified it, by changing the rules. How would we be if Australia, New Zealand and Canada made up their own rules as well?

#33 Edited by rachelepithet (1393 posts) -

.

#34 Posted by DeeGee (2143 posts) -

@Contrarian said:

@Hunter5024 said:

This isn't about accents its about spelling. Phonetically you would never use the letter combo of "re" to make the schwa regardless of your accent you would use "uh", so yes it is more phonetically accurate than the "Theatre" spelling. "Thee-uh-ter" is a closer spelling to Theater and Theatre then "Thee-uh-tuh" is. Your gripe seems to be more with the fact that the word itself changed pronunciations over here, and that everyone in America is pronouncing it incorrectly, but that's actually the spelling of Theatre's fault. Language is always changing, and if people start pronouncing an R that they aren't supposed to then maybe that R shouldn't be there in the first place; which is why I'm defending the more phonetic spelling to begin with.

No, it is about the way it is pronounced and changing the spelling to accommodate that. Phonetics doesn't work and should never be used in English. The phonetic Americans use is the "er". Theatre pronounced by some Americans is "thee-ay-ter", not "thee-uh-ter". I barely know were to begin with your post.

The schwa sound, or "uh" is the non emphasised vowel, in the case of theatre, the last e and it eliminates the sound of the r. We, non-Americans, learn and understand the rules of proper English and apply them with little difficulty. Now, I don't care that Americans spell it 'wrong' or that they emphasise the "er", as long as I don't see it outside of the US. I am merely pointing out that you say it is phonetically correct to spell it theater, when phonetics is based entirely on accent. As accents vary widely across the English speaking world, you can't say the American way of spelling it is 'more' correct. The only true and correct way to say it and spell it is as it was by the English. Everything that varies from that is simply accepted pronounciation and spelling outside of the UK.

The person we have to blame in all of this is Noah Webster. Noah didn't like many of the rules of proper English. He took out the "u" in colour, replaced the 'c' with an 's' in defence, took out the 'ue' in dialogue, dropped the extra 'l' in traveller and replaced the 's' with 'z' in criticise. He even tried to drop the 'ue' on tongue - tung! The point of this fact is that Americans intentionally changed spelling because they thought that their children would learn better if they simplified it, by changing the rules. How would we be if Australia, New Zealand and Canada made up their own rules as well?

As somebody doing a degree in English Language, this is like porn for me.

#35 Posted by Contrarian (1143 posts) -

@DeeGee said:

As somebody doing a degree in English Language, this is like porn for me.

Man, that would have to be the world's worst porn! It makes my penis go "meh".

#36 Posted by RollingZeppelin (2112 posts) -

Americans must have a brain aneurysm when try to pronounce Gloucester or Worcester. Not that they're easy words to pronounce, I had no idea until my Dad who's from England taught me how to say it properly.

Also scones - is it "s-cons" or "s-cones"? I'm of the opinion it should be "s-cons".

#37 Posted by BoG (5192 posts) -

Thea-trythm is the best way, because that is how BoG says it.

#38 Edited by SeriouslyNow (8534 posts) -

Cash Calf

#39 Posted by Contrarian (1143 posts) -

@RollingZeppelin said:

Americans must have a brain aneurysm when try to pronounce Gloucester or Worcester. Not that they're easy words to pronounce, I had no idea until my Dad who's from England taught me how to say it properly.

Also scones - is it "s-cons" or "s-cones"? I'm of the opinion it should be "s-cons".

We used to only say it as 'skone' with a fake posh English accent and over time, found myself saying 'skone' instead of 'skon' all the time. Also, it took me years to finally pronounce Worcestershire (Sauce) correctly every time - it is quite the mouthful ...... war-shista-sheer ..... I believe. The way 'mouth' is pronounced can cause problems as well, when used at the end of a town name. I once went to book a room at a town called Falmouth. I pronounced it as it is spelt - 'foul-mouth' because it sounded funny, and was abruptly told is was called 'Fal-mth'. You just have to love English - it is just so interesting because of its complexities and odd rules.

#40 Posted by RollingZeppelin (2112 posts) -

@Contrarian said:

@RollingZeppelin said:

Americans must have a brain aneurysm when try to pronounce Gloucester or Worcester. Not that they're easy words to pronounce, I had no idea until my Dad who's from England taught me how to say it properly.

Also scones - is it "s-cons" or "s-cones"? I'm of the opinion it should be "s-cons".

We used to only say it as 'skone' with a fake posh English accent and over time, found myself saying 'skone' instead of 'skon' all the time. Also, it took me years to finally pronounce Worcestershire (Sauce) correctly every time - it is quite the mouthful ...... war-shista-sheer ..... I believe. The way 'mouth' is pronounced can cause problems as well, when used at the end of a town name. I once went to book a room at a town called Falmouth. I pronounced it as it is spelt - 'foul-mouth' because it sounded funny, and was abruptly told is was called 'Fal-mth'. You just have to love English - it is just so interesting because of its complexities and odd rules.

Ya, also names like Smithwick are pronounced "smith-ick" except for Brunswick where the w is acutally pronounced for some reason. Worcestershire is actually pronounced "war-sta-shuh".

#41 Posted by Contrarian (1143 posts) -

@RollingZeppelin said:

@Contrarian said:

@RollingZeppelin said:

Americans must have a brain aneurysm when try to pronounce Gloucester or Worcester. Not that they're easy words to pronounce, I had no idea until my Dad who's from England taught me how to say it properly.

Also scones - is it "s-cons" or "s-cones"? I'm of the opinion it should be "s-cons".

We used to only say it as 'skone' with a fake posh English accent and over time, found myself saying 'skone' instead of 'skon' all the time. Also, it took me years to finally pronounce Worcestershire (Sauce) correctly every time - it is quite the mouthful ...... war-shista-sheer ..... I believe. The way 'mouth' is pronounced can cause problems as well, when used at the end of a town name. I once went to book a room at a town called Falmouth. I pronounced it as it is spelt - 'foul-mouth' because it sounded funny, and was abruptly told is was called 'Fal-mth'. You just have to love English - it is just so interesting because of its complexities and odd rules.

Ya, also names like Smithwick are pronounced "smith-ick" except for Brunswick where the w is acutally pronounced for some reason. Worcestershire is actually pronounced "war-sta-shuh".

Damn, I have been getting it wrong all these years! I feel like an idiot, back to the drawing board ........ if you want me, I'll be in my angry dome!

#42 Posted by SecondPersonShooter (620 posts) -

Am I the only person that pronounces it "Thee-At-rhythm" all as one word? Like the word "Theatrical combined with "Rhythm"

#43 Posted by Hunter5024 (5976 posts) -

@Contrarian said:

No, it is about the way it is pronounced and changing the spelling to accommodate that. Phonetics doesn't work and should never be used in English. The phonetic Americans use is the "er". Theatre pronounced by some Americans is "thee-ay-ter", not "thee-uh-ter". I barely know were to begin with your post.

The schwa sound, or "uh" is the non emphasised vowel, in the case of theatre, the last e and it eliminates the sound of the r. We, non-Americans, learn and understand the rules of proper English and apply them with little difficulty. Now, I don't care that Americans spell it 'wrong' or that they emphasise the "er", as long as I don't see it outside of the US. I am merely pointing out that you say it is phonetically correct to spell it theater, when phonetics is based entirely on accent. As accents vary widely across the English speaking world, you can't say the American way of spelling it is 'more' correct. The only true and correct way to say it and spell it is as it was by the English. Everything that varies from that is simply accepted pronounciation and spelling outside of the UK.

The person we have to blame in all of this is Noah Webster. Noah didn't like many of the rules of proper English. He took out the "u" in colour, replaced the 'c' with an 's' in defence, took out the 'ue' in dialogue, dropped the extra 'l' in traveller and replaced the 's' with 'z' in criticise. He even tried to drop the 'ue' on tongue - tung! The point of this fact is that Americans intentionally changed spelling because they thought that their children would learn better if they simplified it, by changing the rules. How would we be if Australia, New Zealand and Canada made up their own rules as well?

Clearly you are a prescriptivist, and all I have to say about that is that you are fighting a pointless and losing battle. Also there is no point in lecturing me on the rules of "proper" english because I have learned the same rules you have, and I only said that the use of "re" doesn't make any sense phonetically. Phonetics may not be perfect, because yes there will always be that grey area because of accents, but they're the best method we've got right now. There is no reason to disregard them, regardless of your opinion on how well it works, because our language is such an idiotic amalgamation that nearly every rule of spelling has a proper and allowable violation somewhere. When you can never be sure for any particular word whether a rule is to be obeyed or accepted through any means other than memorization than our rules are broken, and phonetic spelling is the only way to compensate for that. It's because of stupid rules like those that everyone finds it so difficult to learn English. Your argument against it because of accent's is somewhat valid, however it does not even apply to this case because we are essentially talking about different words in two (slightly) different languages.

You criticize Webster for simplifying and changing the language, and yet that's the way language has always gone, it cannot be a standard thing no matter how hard they try to make it that way. English is ever changing and always evolving, and American-English is not the only version with its idiosyncrasy's, nor is it any less valid than any other simply because it is version 4127 of random-germanic-tribe dialect instead of version 4126. If language were not allowed to change then this entire post would be a drawing of two antelopes sitting down staring at each other indignantly. I'm not arguing that it is more valid either, simply saying that over here Theater is a more logical way of spelling it than Theatre based on the pronunciation, and that over there neither spelling is very good because phonetically they don't line up whatsoever and they should strive to for the reasons I stated earlier.

Also it is almost always pronounced "thee-uh-ter" over here and "thee-ay-ter" is never used (again, over here) except for the sake of embellishment or if someone is trying to sound classical or cultured (as I said before). I dont know why you thought you knew better about that than someone who actually lives in America instead of Australia.

#44 Posted by TooWalrus (13258 posts) -

The-At-Rhythm. Just like it's spelled.

#45 Edited by GunslingerPanda (4859 posts) -

Thear (Like "Fear" but "Th-" instead) - Trith - Um

You know, like it's spelled.

#46 Posted by SethPhotopoulos (5407 posts) -

There's always a post on how American's ruined the english language or are "doing it wrong" in a pronunciation thread. So many english threads recently.

#47 Posted by TheDudeOfGaming (6078 posts) -

The Latest Final Fantasy Game.

#48 Posted by MegaMetaTurtle (414 posts) -

Thee-a-trythm?

#49 Posted by BBQBram (2294 posts) -

@Scrawnto said:

I go with Thea-trhythm.

As do I. It's what it says on the box. Why is this even a point of contention?

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