Anyone know of a list of all Unreal Engine games that isn't Wiki?

#1 Posted by Vitor (2821 posts) -

I'm preferably looking for a press release from Epic, but I'd accept any list. It's for an academic project so I can't exactly quote wikipedia, as much as I'd like to... Might end up quoting GB but I'd prefer something more official. A google search has not helped me out here though so far.

#2 Posted by Ravenlight (8040 posts) -

Make a list on GB using Wikipedia as a resource. Cite that.

#3 Posted by Vitor (2821 posts) -

@Ravenlight said:

Make a list on GB using Wikipedia as a resource. Cite that.

Yeah, I was tempted to but it still won't look great. I'll try googling again but Epic doesn't seem to make that sort of info public.

#4 Posted by NTM (7377 posts) -

@Vitor said:

I'm preferably looking for a press release from Epic, but I'd accept any list. It's for an academic project so I can't exactly quote wikipedia, as much as I'd like to... Might end up quoting GB but I'd prefer something more official. A google search has not helped me out here though so far.

Is this something you can't do, or is it something you think you shouldn't do because you think it'll look bad?

#5 Posted by Wacomole (819 posts) -

Have actually you tried contacting Epic and explaining what you need? You could find that they may be surprisingly accommodating.

#6 Posted by Skald (4367 posts) -

Use a wiki to find the games. Use the games' official web sites as resources.

Unless, of course, what you're looking for is more specific than that.

#7 Posted by Jimmeltoo (6 posts) -

@Vitor: Welcome to the wonderful world of academic research! By choosing not to simply quote Wikipedia, you have already established yourself as a better student than 60% of your peers. Here's my advice:

Option one: Work backwards from your secondary source. If you think it's complete, take the Wikipedia list and work backwards--dig up primary-source information about each game individually (release announcements, interviews, box art scans) which shows that the game used the Unreal engine. Then cite each source individually, for each game. This has the advantage of being reasonably fast, 80-90% accurate, and verifiable. Plus it will make your citations huge which is always a plus. The downside is that you won't know for sure that there weren't more games that simply weren't listed. Depending on how Serious this project is and how important this particular piece of evidence is in supporting your central argument, that might not be a big deal.

Option two: Sniff out primary sources by hand. Search trade mags and press release channels and interviews for "Unreal engine." I'd say do one run through Google, one through Google News, and one through whichever journal database is available through your library (if you really want to be thorough). Again, cite each game individually. This is more of a pain, but I can't imagine this process taking more than 2 hours, and this thread has already been sitting around for 1.5, so...

Option three: Contact Epic and hope that they have a list of games that licensed their engine, that they're willing to show you. If they send you the list rather than just pointing you to one that's already been published, then attach the list as an appendix to your project--refer to your teacher's style guide for help on citing personal correspondences. This has the advantage of being accurate to a bulletproof de jure level, but it leaves you at the mercy of someone else and the odds are low that you'll actually get what you need within the next five days.

Hope that helps!

#8 Posted by Gilsham (293 posts) -

um using wikipedia is not a bad thing as long as you at least check the sources they used.

For some reason people still have a misguided view that Wikipedia is a wild west of information that is always changing and hardly ever right but last time I checked they have a better accuracy rating than the encyclopaedia of the world. Most all my lectures were fine with using Wikipedia if we weren't just stopping there.

I would suggest you use Wikipedia and the Giant Bomb wiki to cross reference and sending a request to epic couldn't hurt I mean you can always update the report before you hand it in if you get more accurate sources

#9 Posted by LordAndrew (14426 posts) -
Using Giant Bomb would be a way worse idea than using Wikipedia. No references, no idea who listed it or when. Go ahead and use Wikipedia, but don't cite it. Use reliable sources provided by the list, and where not provided do your own searching. The developer or publisher should have information confirming that it uses the engine. Having a list is a good start, but your journey doesn't end there.
#10 Posted by Vitor (2821 posts) -

@MoleyUK said:

Have actually you tried contacting Epic and explaining what you need? You could find that they may be surprisingly accommodating.

Hm, you'd be surprised. Had them refuse a lot of questions before in the past.

@Jimmeltoo: Well, that would take a while... Especially as, of my last count, there were over 150 games that licensed unreal... I might have to do that but hopefully an email to epic might get me a faster answer.

#11 Edited by SomeDeliCook (2341 posts) -

State that the games use Unreal Engine and for a source say the logo pops up when you first startup the games.

But seriously, you can't cite Wikipedia as a source and also all of the game's websites?

Can you also not just cite these games featured on the official Unreal Engine site?

http://www.unrealengine.com/showcase

#12 Posted by Guided_By_Tigers (8061 posts) -

Don't use Giant Bomb unless you really want to be wrong.

This edit will also create new pages on Giant Bomb for:

Beware, you are proposing to add brand new pages to the wiki along with your edits. Make sure this is what you intended. This will likely increase the time it takes for your changes to go live.

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