Calling all Yoga and Fitness Experts!

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Junkerman

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Hey Duders!

So I need some hardcore fitness advice about Yoga, and I figured what better place to come to then a website about videogames! ...or I'm too lazy to make a forum account on yoga websites... so hear my story and indulge in my laziness if you so desire! I bet there are a lot of people out there in a similar boat as me.

Long story short: I need to do Yoga... or at least some kind of serious regimented stretching routine.

I spend a lot of time working-out, both indoors and outdoors and my profession requires me to be very physical and engage in a lot of strenuous activity. I'm in excellent physical shape both in terms of strength and cardio, but due to my own ignorance and dislike of wasting time stretching I've essentially lost a large portion of my natural flexibility to the point where its starting to impact my training in other areas and I've finally clued in that I should probably fix it now before I end up seriously hurting myself down the road.

My question is for those of a high fitness level who practice yoga or some form of efficient stretching routine to share their wisdom with me.

Youtube and other places are FULL of these kinds of videos, but the problem I'm having is that I find it kind of overwhelming and a lot of the content I see is either way above my current level or geared for less active people who just want to feel good about themselves. I'm not so much interested in the spiritual side of things as I am in the raw physical benefits. IE I want to be able to touch my toes and lift my leg up at a 45 degree angle instead of 20 lol.

I'm okay with putting the time and the effort in, I want to work hard and I want to be efficient with my time. If there are any duders out there that can enlighten me with something that fits the bill please share!

I prefer something in a video format that I can use as a workout, at least to get started until I gain the knowledge to manage myself.

Thanks for your time! ...and uh... go videogames go!

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csl316

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#2  Edited By csl316

DDP Yoga. Seriously, it's absolutely fantastic.

I've done it for two years and never feel sore. I just got done with 2 hours of basketball and I'm ready to go again.

No spirituality stuff, not too time-consuming, and affordable.

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killer2m8o

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DDP makes it hardcore, but: Aerial, because fun.

Either way, shell out for a few classes, then go it on your own and youtube after you're prepped with a little training. Then you can just attend a class once in a whenever, when you want to improve your set.

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LawGamer

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My first experience with yoga was the p90x one. I'm mostly a runner, so I eventually dropped the rest of the program since I don't really enjoy lifting and prefer more aerobic/outdoor activities, but I kept doing the yoga. I now do it at least once a week as part of my cross-training. Twice a week when it's too cold to skate outdoors.

It's a bit long (90-100 minutes) and it can be tough if you've never done yoga before, but once learned what all the poses were I really started to enjoy it. I have a lot less soreness after running and it's helped get rid of some chronic back soreness I used to get after running on the treadmill during the winter.

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joshwent

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#6  Edited By joshwent

@junkerman: I'll go ahead and echo other folks here by saying DDP Yoga is a revelation. I'm not a fitness person at all, hate going to a gym, and most fitness and yoga tapes either always seemed to bro-ish (for lack of a better term) or way too flowery and spiritual. Well, DDP Yoga is certainly bro-ish (he uses cool Rykert-esque tough guy terms for poses that are identical to classic established yoga ones. "Child's pose" becomes "Safety Zone", etc.), but taken to a ridiculous and rational extreme that I can actually have fun with.

Technically, it starts off for absolute beginners and adds in poses gradually, so it's really not hard to learn and memorize the routines. And, since you're looking to specifically add some flexibility to an already strength-based regimen, a lot of the poses in DDP yoga are also strength based. So you wouldn't necessarily be sacrificing the time from that part of your workouts just to be able to touch your toes. I'm constantly gratified by how sweaty and heart pumping I can get just by standing with many of my muscles engaged (one of the core DDP poses).

Basically, Diamond (as I lovingly call him) shows you the basic pose, with two alternatives. One to make it easier (he created these workouts to be able to do something after his years of fucking up his body as a wrestler), and one to make it harder. So if you opt for the latter, you can get a great overall workout, while increasing your flexibility at the same time.

It's a great thing to check out and sounds like just what you're looking for. Touchdown!

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Quemador

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@lawgamer said:

My first experience with yoga was the p90x one. I'm mostly a runner, so I eventually dropped the rest of the program since I don't really enjoy lifting and prefer more aerobic/outdoor activities, but I kept doing the yoga. I now do it at least once a week as part of my cross-training. Twice a week when it's too cold to skate outdoors.

It's a bit long (90-100 minutes) and it can be tough if you've never done yoga before, but once learned what all the poses were I really started to enjoy it. I have a lot less soreness after running and it's helped get rid of some chronic back soreness I used to get after running on the treadmill during the winter.

Right on the money. I lift weights and it helps with the soreness and in some way your performance. P90x Yoga is the shit !

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csl316

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#9  Edited By csl316

@joshwent said:

@junkerman: I'll go ahead and echo other folks here by saying DDP Yoga is a revelation. I'm not a fitness person at all, hate going to a gym, and most fitness and yoga tapes either always seemed to bro-ish (for lack of a better term) or way too flowery and spiritual. Well, DDP Yoga is certainly bro-ish (he uses cool Rykert-esque tough guy terms for poses that are identical to classic established yoga ones. "Child's pose" becomes "Safety Zone", etc.), but taken to a ridiculous and rational extreme that I can actually have fun with.

Technically, it starts off for absolute beginners and adds in poses gradually, so it's really not hard to learn and memorize the routines. And, since you're looking to specifically add some flexibility to an already strength-based regimen, a lot of the poses in DDP yoga are also strength based. So you wouldn't necessarily be sacrificing the time from that part of your workouts just to be able to touch your toes. I'm constantly gratified by how sweaty and heart pumping I can get just by standing with many of my muscles engaged (one of the core DDP poses).

Basically, Diamond (as I lovingly call him) shows you the basic pose, with two alternatives. One to make it easier (he created these workouts to be able to do something after his years of fucking up his body as a wrestler), and one to make it harder. So if you opt for the latter, you can get a great overall workout, while increasing your flexibility at the same time.

It's a great thing to check out and sounds like just what you're looking for. Touchdown!

Basically expanding on what I would've said if I wasn't typing on the phone earlier. It really does a lot of good things, not only flexibilty but strength and conditioning, as well. He developed the thing while recovering from wrestling injuries, and to prevent further injuries. It starts off pretty simple, so you got that if you need a quick 20 minute thing to get flexible. If you want to do 60+ minute workouts, there are a couple of those. The site and numerous videos are attractive to beginners, but there are people that use it for exactly what you're looking for. And really, the main Extreme workout will give you a nice challenge if you're stuck inside the house for whatever reason.

He uses wrestling names to make it entertaining and to draw on nostalgia, and I'll admit that hearing the technical term for certain things makes me cringe (Pose Dedicated to the Sage Koundinya I!) And I don't have to say Namaste. So I'm FINE WITH THIS. Otherwise:

Loading Video...

And I've yet to find a negative review.

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korwin

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@csl316 said:

@joshwent said:

@junkerman: I'll go ahead and echo other folks here by saying DDP Yoga is a revelation. I'm not a fitness person at all, hate going to a gym, and most fitness and yoga tapes either always seemed to bro-ish (for lack of a better term) or way too flowery and spiritual. Well, DDP Yoga is certainly bro-ish (he uses cool Rykert-esque tough guy terms for poses that are identical to classic established yoga ones. "Child's pose" becomes "Safety Zone", etc.), but taken to a ridiculous and rational extreme that I can actually have fun with.

Technically, it starts off for absolute beginners and adds in poses gradually, so it's really not hard to learn and memorize the routines. And, since you're looking to specifically add some flexibility to an already strength-based regimen, a lot of the poses in DDP yoga are also strength based. So you wouldn't necessarily be sacrificing the time from that part of your workouts just to be able to touch your toes. I'm constantly gratified by how sweaty and heart pumping I can get just by standing with many of my muscles engaged (one of the core DDP poses).

Basically, Diamond (as I lovingly call him) shows you the basic pose, with two alternatives. One to make it easier (he created these workouts to be able to do something after his years of fucking up his body as a wrestler), and one to make it harder. So if you opt for the latter, you can get a great overall workout, while increasing your flexibility at the same time.

It's a great thing to check out and sounds like just what you're looking for. Touchdown!

Basically expanding on what I would've said if I wasn't typing on the phone earlier. It really does a lot of good things, not only flexibilty but strength and conditioning, as well. He developed the thing while recovering from wrestling injuries, and to prevent further injuries. It starts off pretty simple, so you got that if you need a quick 20 minute thing to get flexible. If you want to do 60+ minute workouts, there are a couple of those. The site and numerous videos are attractive to beginners, but there are people that use it for exactly what you're looking for. And really, the main Extreme workout will give you a nice challenge if you're stuck inside the house for whatever reason.

He uses wrestling names to make it entertaining and to draw on nostalgia, and I'll admit that hearing the technical term for certain things makes me cringe (Pose Dedicated to the Sage Koundinya I!) And I don't have to say Namaste. So I'm FINE WITH THIS. Otherwise:

Loading Video...

And I've yet to find a negative review.

It's always weird's me out that the Yoga instructor in this video looks kind of like my friends wife.

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SloppyDetective

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All my yoga experience comes from P90x. It all started with the original yoga dvd that is like 1:30 min long. I learned the basics by just pushing play and paying attention to form and what not. Now I do the 30 min P90x3 video with the rest of the routine. Since you sound like you have all other aspects of your fitness covered you don't really need the whole program. I would suggest buying some dvd program and starting from there. You could even just purchase a P90x yoga dvd off of ebay--I would suggest P90x2 as it's the most well rounded. But really any dvd that shows you the basics and how to modify them until your ready will work.

After familiarizing yourself with the basic moves, I would look into a finding some classes to take; I plan on taking some at my local rec center soon. This way you will have some sort of instructor to check your form and ensure you are doing everything correct.

P.S. I've tried DDP yoga and it wasn't really for me, it is a decent program though. One thing to keep in mind with it is it not only focuses on stretching but also isometric holding--which is basically tightening your muscles as hard as you can, while you perform the moves. This raises your heart rate up and essentially is low impact cardio. So if you just want a program that focuses on the stretching aspects I would skip DDP.

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joshwent

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One thing to keep in mind with it is it not only focuses on stretching but also isometric holding--which is basically tightening your muscles as hard as you can, while you perform the moves. This raises your heart rate up and essentially is low impact cardio. So if you just want a program that focuses on the stretching aspects I would skip DDP.

This is a great point. That part of those exercises is one of the main things I love about the whole program, but a big part of that is because those yoga routines and some simple weight lifting and bike riding are all the exercise I do.

If you're looking for a routine that is for pure flexibility separate from other strength training, DDP might not the best fit. Of course, as I said above, it does give you some of the strength/cardio, so that could be appealing to someone if they feel like they're sacrificing that exercise time to basically only do stretches.

I dunno. Should probably go to bed now. Both workouts seem great! ;)

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Arabes

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@joshwent: Actually Dan has said that he finds it stupid how DDP uses American football and wrestling terms instead of their actual names

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csl316

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Bane

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All of my yoga experience comes from the P90X programs as well.

I think the P90X routine is great, but overly long at an hour and a half. I can't remember much of anything about the P90X2 routine for some reason. The P90X3 routine is great. It's only 30 minutes, and it hits the basic poses: vinyasa, downward dog, sun salutation, the warriors, and the triangles. There's some balance work in the middle, and it ends with some stretching.

The P90X workout also comes with a dedicated stretching routine which really helped to loosen me up.

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stinky

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you got some tight hamstrings.

not sure you have to do yoga for that alone, doing simple stretch routines can also be good.

but i'd suggest taking an actual yoga class if you can, always great for discipline and you can talk to a person about concentrating on certain muscle groups if thats what you want.

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Y2Ken

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#17  Edited By Y2Ken

Yeah doing a lot of sport or gym activity will often tighten up ligaments so yoga can be great for that. I started going to a yoga class about four months ago, it's once a week and mostly physical stuff (about 50 minutes of active rotations, strength work, stretches, balances, all that good stuff, followed by about 5-10 minutes of more relaxing wind-down stretches and such). I feel fitter and more flexible already, and my teacher is great too, although I'm not convinced she's a human because she bends in ways people aren't supposed to. She has a youtube channel with a few different simple rotations that might help if you're looking to achieve specific goals.

I'd definitely recommend going to a class at least a few times if you can do, it's great to have someone help you with your form as it can be difficult to know when you're doing things correctly especially if you are new to it. Important things to remember are to focus on your breathing, don't be afraid to give everything a try and if you can only get halfway into a stretch and hold it for one or two breaths that's fine. The more you do it the further you'll be able to push yourself, my friend who is also going to the same class plays a lot of football (soccer) and he finds the stretches harder than I do but he's definitely said it is much easier than it was at first. Hamstrings are involved a lot in yoga poses. Good luck with it, I hope it helps you!

Also that video of Dan and his dad is phenomenal, so thanks for that.

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stinky

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you may already know this but figured i'd bring it up.

weight lifting shortens muscle, stretching as name implies, lengthens.

not sure what type of body you have but realize your body type can limit your ability to stretch.

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Junkerman

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Thanks for all the great feedback guys!

I'll look into the P90X and DDP and see what fits the bill more for what I need. I've started just by doing some youtube videos, I found a couple fairly easy ones that I'll stick with for a few weeks until I start making some progress. My problem right now is that I'm ~so~ unflexible that I'm going to be needing to stretch muscles before I can even get into the poses to stretch what they're wanting you to.

Its been a great lesson in humility so far, with exercise and weight training I've just been used to soldiering through- if you want results you just work harder etc. - but with this kind of stuff it seems time and commitment over the long term is the only way to get somewhere.

You guys have given some really great comments, so I'll hunker down and get flexible.

I should probably film myself with a sitcom laugh track in the background. I feel like a plastic action figure compared to what some of these people out there can do! Truly remarkable and a reason to stick with it.