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#451 Posted by Sombre (277 posts) -

@humanity said:

@sombre: I have not and I was actually really surprised to suddenly see it in stores a few days ago. It shouldn't be surprising that an author wrote another novel but somehow I heard nothing about this coming. 1Q84 was incredibly disappointing for me and his next novel Colorless Tsukuru.. failed to really engage me. This was kind of a shock because up until 1Q84 Murakami was an author that could do no wrong for me - I had read all of his full feature novels and really enjoyed them all in various degrees. After Dark is probably the one that was beginning to be a little too wishy washy with ambiguity but I still really liked the concept of it. In comparison 1Q84 was incredibly boring and spanning three entire novels didn't help that at all. Colorless.. was ironically just that - kinda flat, nothing stood out.

So I'm interested to read this new one after I'm finally done with the Witcher books, but I'm also a little anxious about it. The few reviews I read were very middle down the road.

That sucks dude. I fucking LOVE Kafka, probably in my top 3 books ever read. I also really liked 1Q84, even if I associate it with a bad time in my life. I think I'll check out Commendatore at some point, just for another Murakami masterclass in surrealism

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#452 Edited by 49th (3879 posts) -

I've just finished the second book in the Chaos Walking trilogy. The books are definitely written for young adults but the premise is unique and keeps me reading. I find that some of the plot points seem a little too convenient or undeserved but the overall story is good.

I'm looking forward to the movie next year as I think it could translate really well to the screen.

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#453 Posted by Creigz (227 posts) -

I've been reading a couple books, first one is Bloody Rose by Nicholas Eames. It's part of a group of books based in a D&D like universe. The first book is my favorite of the two right now, but we'll see what else comes out. This one is quite good, don't get me wrong but I related to the characters more in the first book is all.

Also I'm reading The Hackers Playbook 3. It's pretty simplified so even a non-professional infosec person can grasp the concepts.

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#454 Posted by BladeOfCreation (1205 posts) -

@patoday: I read the first one earlier this year and thought it was fantastic, I'm planning on reading the next two books back-to-back soon.

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#455 Posted by PatODay (383 posts) -
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#456 Posted by Sombre (277 posts) -

@49th said:

I've just finished the second book in the Chaos Walking trilogy. The books are definitely written for young adults but the premise is unique and keeps me reading. I find that some of the plot points seem a little too convenient or undeserved but the overall story is good.

I'm looking forward to the movie next year as I think it could translate really well to the screen.

Is that the Knife of Never Letting go series? That was number 3 in my top things of 2015!

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#457 Edited by wollywoo (192 posts) -

@humanity: Finished Norwegian Wood. Pretty great. Here's my review.

Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami

This is a story about sex, death, and mental illness, and how those three feed off of each other in strange combinations. I've heard his book called the Japanese Catcher in the Rye, but they have almost nothing in common, except that both Murakami and Salinger both have great ears for dialogue. My favorite characters were Reiko and Midori who are, respectively, fascinating and hilarious. Certain images - an abandoned well, Midori playing her guitar from a balcony while watching a building burn, Toru feeding cucumbers to a dying man - seem like they will stick in my memory for quite a while. The main flaw, to me, is that the main character is a bit of a blank slate - it seems like every girl he runs into instantly falls in love with him and either sleeps with him or tells him her most intimate secrets, so he must be something special, but I'm not sure exactly why. He's obviously a stand-in for the author, but maybe if there was more distance between the two he would be more interesting. I don't speak Japanese, but there are some strange word choices that make me wonder if the translation is a bit wonky in places.

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#458 Edited by SloppyDetective (1567 posts) -

I just started Cannery Row by Steinbeck, and while I'm a big fan of what I've previously read of his (Grapes, Pearl and Mice), I've found this to be a bit of a slog. There are interstitial pieces inserted between more traditional chapters where he is describing the atmosphere of areas in Cannery Row and the style and flow of these parts have been really unappealing. They are these pseudo-poetic descriptions that are full of back to back $10 dollar words that make it feel like I'm reading a college text book version of literary pros. I mean I'm a moron so I'm sure someone could evocatively explain to me why these are great writing, but on my own they are just tedious. The rest of the book has focused on the characters and why they reside in these places in Cannery Row, and those are as delightful as all the other writings of his I'm familiar with. He is talking about a different type of people in this book than the others I've read in that there is a seediness to their low status compared to the characters in Grapes and The Pearl. These are down and out people living in the skids but he cares about them just as much as any of his other characters, and that's something I really love about his writing.

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#459 Posted by Humanity (18396 posts) -

Just finished the Inverted World by Christopher Priest and it’s a fascinating read about a city on rails that is constantly moving. It’s an oldie but a real goodie with some amazing twists and turns along the way.

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#460 Posted by MonkeyKing1969 (7408 posts) -

I had started listening to is "The Long Earth Series" by British authors Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter. It is an interesting series, but I don't love it. I can see what teh authors were going for "what if" the westward expansion went on forever on parallel earths. But, truthfully, this was a situation where two great authors produce a really dreadful series of books. But, I gave the second book a go...and yeah, this one is not good either. So, a regrettable "Do Not Recommend" for me on "The Long Earth Series"

Before the holidays I listened to "Tau Zero" 1970, by Poul Anderson. This is a very 1970s science fiction book, like full bell-bottoms with paisley shirt 1970s book. It deals with the phenomenon of what happens when you are in a broken spaceship that keeps accelerating faster. A vehicle can never reach the speed of light, teh occupants and ship are alway chasing the last few fractions of the speed of light...99.898, 99.899, all the way up to 99.99998 and beyond. However, what does happen is time speeds-up so that years, centuries, and eons pass by outside as they accelerate. In teh final horus Billion-year cycles which pass as moments for the people in the ship as their ship. I won't give away what happens, but I will say the book is more about the people and how they cope as their journey puts them beyond all that they knew. So, this is a "Recommend if you like 1970s sci fi".