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#1 Posted by soulfulsoul (186 posts) -

I'd like to get a reasonably powerful desktop PC which I would mostly be running CAD and Autodesk 3ds Max / other rendering programs on. Is a gaming PC reasonable, or does it make sense to get a workstation? I have read that for the most part workstations are not really necessary for home use, though they are specifically designed for CAD and rendering? Would it make any sense to build my own PC when I have no experience with it? It seems like it would be fun, but I'm not sure I really have the time to put into it.

Thanks, any thoughts would be appreciated!

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#2 Posted by Asurastrike (2306 posts) -

I'd like to get a reasonably powerful desktop PC which I would mostly be running CAD and Autodesk 3ds Max / other rendering programs on. Is a gaming PC reasonable, or does it make sense to get a workstation? I have read that for the most part workstations are not really necessary for home use, though they are specifically designed for CAD and rendering? Would it make any sense to build my own PC when I have no experience with it? It seems like it would be fun, but I'm not sure I really have the time to put into it.

Thanks, any thoughts would be appreciated!

Gaming PCs don't rely too heavily on CPUs (most games still run fine on the 5 year old i5 2500k) or RAM (for most games 8GB is more than enough) and instead focus on a monster GPU.

Building a PC can take as little as 45 minutes to an hour if you know what your doing, or 2 to 3 hours if you are completely brand new. Pcgamer.com has a number of recommended builds that are based on price that you might want to take a look at.

http://www.pcgamer.com/pc-build-guide-high-end-gaming-pc/

http://www.pcgamer.com/pc-build-guide-high-end-gaming-pc/

Sorry if this isn't particularly helpful. I have build Gaming PCs in the past, but CAD and Autodesk have never been something I took into consideration.

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#3 Posted by korwin (3918 posts) -

If you are looking for some kind of middle ground look into one of Asus' WS line of motherboards on socket 2011. They accept both Standard i7's and Xeons and have support for standard DDR4 memory and ECC DDR4 Memory. They are a little more costly however, what with the workstation bits and all.

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#4 Edited by troll93 (534 posts) -

A question worth asking is what kind of CAD you are doing? If all you are talking about is wireframe drawings, as long as you have a decent CPU (i5 will work most of the time) you should be fine with gaming components. The only other thing to remember is that you would want 16/32 gb of ram as sometimes people hate you and send dog's loaded up with gigabytes of unnecessary information.

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#5 Posted by soulfulsoul (186 posts) -

Thanks. I would be doing both 2D drawings and modeling in 3D, then rendering those models. However, nothing as crazy as rendering Avatar or anything like that. Does anyone know what kind of intensity of work Workstation PCs and / or workstation hardware such as graphics cards are recommended for? Is it CGI in Star Wars kind of stuff, or does it make sense for something as simple as rendering one static image at a time?

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#6 Posted by troll93 (534 posts) -

@soulfulsoul: It is a bit of a "how long is a piece of string" question. Is there any chance that you could give any more details into what you are looking to render? Failing that, if a 1 is static shots of a single object with a single light source and a 10 is hundreds of objects, with dozens of lighting sources in a 30 minute long video, where are you aiming to operate as your core usage. Ignore high numbers that are going to happen one or twice in the life of the computer. It is easy enough for those cases to just let it run overnight.