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    The PC (Personal Computer) is a highly configurable and upgradable gaming platform that, among home systems, sports the widest variety of control methods, largest library of games, and cutting edge graphics and sound capabilities.

    GSYNC? You got it? What's it doing for you?

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    rorie

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    I guess we're like nine months into the GSYNC era and I'm curious if anyone's been using it and whether you think it's worth the upcharge. I'm itching for a new computer build, but I think I'm going to spring for a new monitor first. I'd like a 1440p/144hz/1ms thingamabob, but goddamn are those expensive.

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    slowhanded

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    #2  Edited By slowhanded

    GSYNC is one of those pleasures you never realize you're enjoying until you remember you've had it on the whole time and recall never seeing tearing. It's a minor addition at best for me, especially considering for most of my games, 60 fps is totally a-okay with me.

    Just as a heads up for you, Rorie, to get the most out of a 1440p/144hz monitor you also need a rig able to run games at that high of a framerate. I'm not sure what your build looks like, but any AAA game that's come out in the past year is going to be mighty difficult to get running to 120+ fps, even with a crazy rig like a Triple 980 SLI and a OC'd 4790k.

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    Rayeth

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    And another big point is that a lot of the recently shipped games (at least the ones I've played: Civ:BE, Mordor, & Valkyria Chronicles) have had weird issues running at Refresh rates above 120Hz at least at release. I know Civ:BE got a patch pretty close after release that took care of some of that stuff. Valkyria looks like it works well most of the time but encounters weird bugs with high refresh rates (like some things are being done faster than they should have, equipment wearing out early, taking more crossfire, etc). Mordor had reports at launch of it straight up not running at 144Hz. You had to drop down to 120Hz or less to get the game to boot, but those were again fixed in a patch after a week or two.

    I'm sure it will get better with time as more PC devs get used to that hardware being out there, but be warned that you need to be ready to deal with that stuff.

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    hassun

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    #4  Edited By hassun

    The limitations are too harsh. I really don't go around buying monitors very often.

    I also don't really want to be locked down to 1 particular brand of GPU. We have enough of a problem as it is with only 2 players on the market and 1 of those two players being extremely dominant. (Same problem on the CPU front as well.)

    My opinion on this extends to brand exclusive features like PhysX and Mantle as well, even though they don't require you to buy extra hardware.

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    rorie

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    GSYNC is one of those pleasures you never realize you're enjoying until you remember you've had it on the whole time and recall never seeing tearing. It's a minor addition at best for me, especially considering for most of my games, 60 fps is totally a-okay with me.

    Just as a heads up for you, Rorie, to get the most out of a 1440p/144hz monitor you also need a rig able to run games at that high of a framerate. I'm not sure what your build looks like, but any AAA game that's come out in the past year is going to be mighty difficult to get running to 120+ fps, even with a crazy rig like a Triple 980 SLI and a OC'd 4790k.

    I likely wouldn't try to run games at that rate - just get something to futureproof with and have a big-ass monitor for desktop stuff in the meantime.

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    slowhanded

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    #6  Edited By slowhanded

    I will say though, WoW feels absolutely fantastic running at 144hz. Perhaps has something to do with how much you turn in that game combined with the FOV. Probably a huge plus going for you to look that way when buying a new monitor.

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    MOAB

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    @rayeth said:

    Valkyria looks like it works well most of the time but encounters weird bugs with high refresh rates (like some things are being done faster than they should have, equipment wearing out early, taking more crossfire, etc).

    I've played about 10 hours of Valkyria and I never seen anything about equipment wear. What would even wear out? Does that even exist in Valkyria?

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    ajamafalous

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    @moab said:

    @rayeth said:

    Valkyria looks like it works well most of the time but encounters weird bugs with high refresh rates (like some things are being done faster than they should have, equipment wearing out early, taking more crossfire, etc).

    I've played about 10 hours of Valkyria and I never seen anything about equipment wear. What would even wear out? Does that even exist in Valkyria?

    Can't speak to Valkyria, but it's a problem in the PC version of Dark Souls 2. The equipment durability is based on how many frames the weapon is 'inside' of an enemy, causing them to break twice as fast as the console versions if you're running at 60 fps. Kinda inexcusable.

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    slowhanded

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    @moab said:

    @rayeth said:

    Valkyria looks like it works well most of the time but encounters weird bugs with high refresh rates (like some things are being done faster than they should have, equipment wearing out early, taking more crossfire, etc).

    I've played about 10 hours of Valkyria and I never seen anything about equipment wear. What would even wear out? Does that even exist in Valkyria?

    Can't speak to Valkyria, but it's a problem in the PC version of Dark Souls 2. The equipment durability is based on how many frames the weapon is 'inside' of an enemy, causing them to break twice as fast as the console versions if you're running at 60 fps. Kinda inexcusable.

    It's not a coincidence both games are made by Japanese devs. In a country where PC gaming is all but completely dead, you see a ton of wonky stuff happen with 30+ FPS, as tying physics to frames is a well-used simplification in game logic for programming, albeit one that's less and less used in the West with the resurgence in PC gaming. On a side-note, this is also the root of a ton of weird bugs and glitches that eventually can culminate in those crazy skips we see in speed runs.

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    ajamafalous

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    @ajamafalous said:

    @moab said:

    @rayeth said:

    Valkyria looks like it works well most of the time but encounters weird bugs with high refresh rates (like some things are being done faster than they should have, equipment wearing out early, taking more crossfire, etc).

    I've played about 10 hours of Valkyria and I never seen anything about equipment wear. What would even wear out? Does that even exist in Valkyria?

    Can't speak to Valkyria, but it's a problem in the PC version of Dark Souls 2. The equipment durability is based on how many frames the weapon is 'inside' of an enemy, causing them to break twice as fast as the console versions if you're running at 60 fps. Kinda inexcusable.

    It's not a coincidence both games are made by Japanese devs. In a country where PC gaming is all but completely dead, you see a ton of wonky stuff happen with 30+ FPS, as tying physics to frames is a well-used simplification in game logic for programming, albeit one that's less and less used in the West with the resurgence in PC gaming. On a side-note, this is also the root of a ton of weird bugs and glitches that eventually can culminate in those crazy skips we see in speed runs.

    Oh yeah, I totally understand why it happens, I just.... it can't be that hard to release a fully-functioning product. Granted, Valkyria and DS2 have very minor problems when compared to something like Saints Row 2 and Red Faction: Guerilla. IIRC, they had the opposite problem, in that their engines were hard-coded for the number of clock cycles per second of the consoles, so when they were ported to PC and everybody had way faster processors, it broke nearly everything.

    Am I asking too much for basic functions to work properly? I guess I just hold programs to a higher standard, as someone who majored in computer engineering. I don't know. Hard-coding values is bad. That's my lesson, I guess.

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    korwin

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    I messed with a gsync display at PAX, the machine was running Metro LL. The experience is really great, you're constant getting the most out of the machine and dropping frames isn't anywhere as remotely jarring (no tearing, no stuttering). I've been trying to restrain myself and wait for the non proprietary version of it built in the the new Display Port spec but it's getting hard (especially with the Asus ROG Swift out on the market).

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    Jams

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    #12  Edited By Jams
    @rorie said:

    I guess we're like nine months into the GSYNC era and I'm curious if anyone's been using it and whether you think it's worth the upcharge. I'm itching for a new computer build, but I think I'm going to spring for a new monitor first. I'd like a 1440p/144hz/1ms thingamabob, but goddamn are those expensive.

    I go to this website for all my fast refresh rate info. I have a BenQ 144hz monitor with strobing enabled (for CRT like response times). I don't know about other monitors but the usual trade off seems to be color and contrast. When I turn the strobing on, it really dulls out the image. You don't really notice it after you start playing where as you really notice when you're running 120hz with strobing on a game that can reach those frames.

    http://www.blurbusters.com/

    edit: Here's an article reviewing G-SYNC in particular. I didn't read it but it looks really fleshed out. http://www.blurbusters.com/gsync/preview/?source=sidebar

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    slowhanded

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    #13  Edited By slowhanded

    I did get to try out my friend's ASUS PG278Q recently, and I have to say, even with strobing, the contrast and color reproduction seems great (matching my expectations for any solid TN-based panel out there). Only the brightness takes a noticeable hit, and it wasn't as severe as I've seen on the BenQ 27s. The review at TFTCentral confirmed my thoughts, it's one dope monitor, especially if you really want that CRT-like lack of nearly any input lag.

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    rorie

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    #14  Edited By rorie

    I did get to try out my friend's ASUS PG278Q recently, and I have to say, even with strobing, the contrast and color reproduction seems great (matching my expectations for any solid TN-based panel out there). Only the brightness takes a noticeable hit, and it wasn't as severe as I've seen on the BenQ 27s. The review at TFTCentral confirmed my thoughts, it's one dope monitor, especially if you really want that CRT-like lack of nearly and input lag.

    Yeah, that's one of the ones that I've been looking for, but dat pricetag, tho.

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    slowhanded

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    @rorie said:

    @slowhanded said:

    I did get to try out my friend's ASUS PG278Q recently, and I have to say, even with strobing, the contrast and color reproduction seems great (matching my expectations for any solid TN-based panel out there). Only the brightness takes a noticeable hit, and it wasn't as severe as I've seen on the BenQ 27s. The review at TFTCentral confirmed my thoughts, it's one dope monitor, especially if you really want that CRT-like lack of nearly and input lag.

    Yeah, that's one of the ones that I've been looking for, but dat pricetag, tho.

    If you're trying to future proof yourself, until graphics cards can start pumping out 144hz at 4k resolutions, it would definitely be the way to go. That monitor has the legs to run with the pack for a long while. Other than being a TN panel and sticker shock, there are little to no downsides. This thing is sky high above its gaming competitors.

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    slickdasani

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    #16  Edited By slickdasani

    I saw that Asus one at a store recently, for a TN panel it actually looks pretty good (I would hope so at the price tag). I recently switched to 1440p though, you don't notice it much till you go back to a lower res monitor, 1080p on a monitor looks a little blurry to me now.

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