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    Potential Ryzen Upgrade

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    deactivated-629fdfa1dbf9a

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    Hi Guys,

    I've been a Intel fanboy since the Dual Core Duo came out and have never considered going back to Intel until now.

    I'm after building a new DDR4 gaming Rig.

    However i need some knowledge. At the minute i'm running a 1150 i5-4670K (16gb RAM on a MSI gaming mobo plus a 980ti)

    I'm looking at just replacing the mobo/cpu/ram.

    I have taken a shine to the AMD Ryzen 1600X. How much of an actually upgrade will this be? Intel stuff just seems really expensive for what you get these days.

    Thanks for the advice

    Barberforce

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    stonyman65

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    #2  Edited By stonyman65

    Ryzen is decent but still doesn't match Intel in sinle core performance so it really comes down to how you are using the system. If you are using a lot of other apps or doing tasks that require multi threading like video or image rendering, or if you a playing games that are cpu bound and take advantage of multiple cores, then Ryzen is a good choice.

    If you aren't doing any of that and it is strictly a gaming machine? Playing game that don't take advantage of multi core (which is most of them), then go with Intel since they are better optimized for single core.

    Keep in mind also that Ryzen is still pretty new and there are still some bugs to work out. I'd wait until those problems get fixed first unless you don't mind dealing with weird stuff.

    Edit: whoa bad typos. Sorry I just woke up.

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    Dray2k

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    #3  Edited By Dray2k

    To be honest, get a Ryzen if you want to plan doing video editing or a lot of professional Streaming, multitasking and rendering of any kind.

    If not, get an Intel, the most recent Intel CPUs are doing their job way better than Ryzen CPUs do, mostly because high-end Intel CPUs are way stronger and more sophisticated per-core than AMDs CPUs that rely a lot on multicore functionality.

    Complex programms, like video games, have to be optimized with the CPU architecture in mind. You can't just code a game and the CPU handles it. Multi-core optimization is quite the process, so programmers have to actually "reoptimize" their games for x cores, rather than, lets say, 2 or 4 cores. Stuff like this takes a bit of time (from previous knowledge, Supreme Commander came out quite a bit later because the game got developed during the time in which multicores became popular).

    At any case, get a Ryzen 1800x if you like doing several things professionally at once. If you just enjoy Streaming, like your usual streamer does, or playing games which requires a lot of CPU power (like Mount and Blade - Viking Conquest) get a high end Intel CPU like the 7600k or 7700k. Intel chips are also always better in benchmarks, and what I could gather is that for the price, the most powerful Intel chips have about the same Price-Performance difference as AMD chips have.

    One thing to note, The most high-end Ryzen chip cost about 500 USD which is a lot but I don't recommend getting a 1700x, which also costs about as much as the most expensive user high-end Intel CPUs. Ryzen chips perform excellent in simple Benchmarkings.

    I would say that you should get an Intel if you do not want to do several things at once all the time. Otherwise I would recommend to wait for the next year when we know how well the next-gen Intel chips will perform.

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    mak_wikus

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    #4  Edited By mak_wikus

    I'm looking into a Ryzen 5 build and the whole RAM compatibility situation is driving me absolutely nuts. I'll be getting MSI B350M Bazooka motherboard and for some reason, when MSI is doing their memory compatibility tests(it applies to other manufacturers also) they completely ignore 4GB sticks(and that's what I aim for - a 2x4GB kit). There's also the speeds stuff. Like, some CPUs will work on clocks up to 2400MHz, some to 2666MHz, 3000MHz doesn't work AT ALL and you have to downclock to 2933... And what the hell is "single rank memory"?? I've never heard of this! Why do they need me to pay attention to this all of a sudden?

    Ugh... Sorry, maybe I exaggerated a bit with the ranting. I just like to plan everything before making any purchases, make sure everything will work and all this RAM stuff is driving me up the wall.

    Anyway, right now I'm looking at Corsair Vengeance LPX or Crucial Ballistix, both as 2x4GB kits. And at 2400MHz, since this is the speed that seems to work in most cases. And it's crazy. The price difference between 2400 and 3000 is basically non-existent. I'm paranoid now.

    Okay, I'm done. Sorry, this post is longer than I initially planned. Anyway, good luck with your build and remember to look into the memory stuff!

    Also, maybe someone can help me? ...help...?

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    yabbering_yeti

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    @mak_wikus:

    Single Rank Memory has the chips down just one side of the PCB. I would recommend looking at motherboards ram compatibility lists, as it lists RAM tested and confirmed at certain speeds by the manufacturer... but that can be hit and miss. Also RAM rated as 3200mhz is actually overclocked heavily to get there - it's not true 3200Mhz RAM, and that's why there is a big compatibility issue. It's not pre-overclocked either, when you stick in in it will be running at it's default - so probably 2133 (or 2400 if you get some of the pricier stuff)

    A lot of people having trouble hitting anything over 2133 mhz is because that's the RAM's actual clock speed, and they aren't getting any overclocks to stick at all. Others can get a bit higher, but it's still overclock and the Auto-OC features on the motherboards hasn't been working very well (for the most parT). Generally, people have more luck when doing it manual, if they know what they are doing.

    If you do buy 3200mhz rated RAM, and it's on the motherboard compatibility list at that speed, you can be pretty confident hitting at least 3000mhz... probably!

    I've been looking at this RAM - GSKILL Flare X F4-3200C14D - as it's on most compatibility lists, is single rank, and has some good CAS and timings, plus it's one of the rare sets that's actually 2400mhz, not 2133mhz, so reaching 3200mhz is less of an OC. It's pretty expensive though...

    Still, bios updates do improve things and people have hope for the future. Just make sure you check out your motherboard before you buy it, and make sure it is getting regular (about 4 at this stage) bios updates... some motherboards haven't been kept updated, which means they are still buggy as heck. You can check this by going to the support page on the motherboard manufacturer's website and looking at the bios updates for the board.

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    OurSin_360

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    #6  Edited By OurSin_360

    Seems like cost vs performance the 1600x is pretty damn good, and on par with an i5 atm from what i can see. In practice i don't know how much of an upgrade for gaming it will be, so if that's the reason i don't see a big reason to update your cpu at all right now unless you go for the real expensive intel cpu's (even then won't see much real world performance gain in games. Your system seems to be pretty good still to me and a graphics card will get you more frames at higher resolutions IMO, unless you play a lot of cpu intensive games. If you just want to upgrade then go for it and you will probably see a minimal performance increase, but an increase none the less.

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    yabbering_yeti

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    If I were you, I would wait a generation. Your system is still solid, and you will get a more meaningful upgrade for the same price in a years time when Volta and Vega are out, and Ryzen has had time to mature and iterate - not to mention, that gives time for intel to respond to Ryzen pricing.

    At the moment getting that Ryzen and using it primarily for gaming is more likely to be a sidegrade than an upgrade

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    Dave_Tacitus

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    If I were you, I would wait a generation. Your system is still solid, and you will get a more meaningful upgrade for the same price in a years time when Volta and Vega are out, and Ryzen has had time to mature and iterate - not to mention, that gives time for intel to respond to Ryzen pricing.

    At the moment getting that Ryzen and using it primarily for gaming is more likely to be a sidegrade than an upgrade

    I tend to agree. I've got the same specs as the OP (4670K, 16GB RAM, exactly the same GPU) but I'm holding off for a time.

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    mak_wikus

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    @yabbering_yeti: Thank you for taking the time to patiently reply to my mad ramblings.

    I'm pretty dead-set on Ryzen 5 1500x and MSI B350M Bazooka(better clocks and cooler than on 1400 and the mobo allows for reasonable OC and I found both for cheap). MSI seems to be updating the BIOS pretty regularly(four updates so far).

    When it comes to compatibility though... I found a great deal for Corsair Vengeance LPX 2x4GB kit at 3000MHz and... Well, Ryzens don't like 3000MHz memory and MSI, for their tests, seems to ignore anything lower than 8GB sticks. They're just not listed at all. Does having 4GB sticks instead of 8GB sticks make much of a difference compatibility-wise?

    Also, I contacted the store and they said that it's absolutely possible to return the memory and buy something else if things don't work, so I think I'm just gonna risk it.

    Being obsessive AND on a tight budget sucks...

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    ripelivejam

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    i really REALLY want AMD to stay competitive, just to have the variety and to force each company to try hard to outdo each other, but it just doesn't sond like it. ryzen cpus sound great and i'm sure they perform well, but it still sounds like they're behind, which is odd considering the amount of time they've been working on this. unless you're into productivity i suppose. i always kind of regretted my fx8350 purchase a few years ago, felt like it was holding me back all the time i was using it until i finally got an i7.

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    Chummy8

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    #11  Edited By Chummy8

    Funny seeing this thread as my gaming PC just blew up. I had a decent, underpowered AMD PC with a FX 8320 cpu and a 400w PSU that shorted out and took the mobo/cpu with it. I upgraded this past week using Logical Increments . My new computer is basically the "Great" PC line. I was looking to upgrade anyway and I used my old PC bricking as an excuse to finally pull the trigger on this.

    R5 Ryzen 1600

    GTX 1060 3gb

    MSI Tomahawk Mobo

    16gb RAM

    So far, I'm loving my new computer. It has no trouble running my games on a higher setting than I used to run them. Deus Ex: MD is now set to high for example (it was medium) Forza Horizon 3 is still set to medium, but it runs MUCH better. The CPU is great and since I didn't change my 1060, the performance boost I see now is entirely because of the Ryzen.

    Here is a benchmark site I used to research my purchase before I bought the parts.

    CPU Benchmark i5-4670k vs R5 1600x

    Based on this benchmark, the Ryzen would be a substantial upgrade for you, along the lines I am seeing now as the 1600 and 1600x aren't too far off. Yeah, it's new tech and maybe there would be problems down the line because of that. But I don't regret my upgrade.

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    Justin258

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    A 4670k should still be able to handle any game you throw at it with ease. Unless you also do a lot of super CPU intensive tasks, wait a generation or two.

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    nycnewyork

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    i really REALLY want AMD to stay competitive, just to have the variety and to force each company to try hard to outdo each other, but it just doesn't sond like it. ryzen cpus sound great and i'm sure they perform well, but it still sounds like they're behind, which is odd considering the amount of time they've been working on this. unless you're into productivity i suppose. i always kind of regretted my fx8350 purchase a few years ago, felt like it was holding me back all the time i was using it until i finally got an i7.

    I do too, but grapevine has it intem may be making the new i5 a 6 core cpu. If that happens, AMD will no longer be competitive.

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    AlexW00d

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    Why are you upgrading? That CPU should still be fine for any games, hell my 2500k is still trucking along (admittedly at 4.6ghz). If it's just gaming, which is all you've mentioned, you probably won't notice a huge upgrade, especially if you're thinking of going AMD.

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    leftie68

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    I am with Alexw00d. Why are you upgrading, especially those components (mobo/cpu)? You said you were on a budget, why not save the dough for a later build? You have a K series, just overclock that beast and you should be good to go for a while.

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