Every Fighting Game I have Ever Owned

This is it. Every fighting game I've ever owned that I can remember.

List items

  • Gameboy Version. This was the first game on the gameboy that me and my little brother both bought copies of to play each other. I was pretty little so I don't really know if the game was considered good or not, but we ate it up. I remember it was a 2D game with sides you could fall off of. That remains pretty unique to this day for a 2D fighter. It was also the first game I played where the story mode started giving you story background when you picked your character and not just after you beat end boss.

  • GBA Version. I picked this up well after its release date when I found it in some bargain bin. I don't remember too much about it. Honestly I had forgotten I owned the game until making this list reminded me of it. I think it was considered pretty competent for a GBA fighter.

  • 360 Version. Pretty much fixes every complaint I had with MvC3. If you're going to get one version this is the one to get. I'm not going to try to dive deep into this game as that ended poorly with MvC3, and I don't see anything new in this version that would change that outcome.

  • 360 Version. I just couldn't get into this at all. I didn't even finish the story mode. I'm not really sure why it didn't grab me in any way. Maybe I'll have to give it a little more time down the road.

  • 360, PC Versions. I always liked the slower CvS games more than the over the top MvC games, so this versus game appeals to me a lot more than (U)MvC3. I was afraid that losing a round when any one of your character's lifebars was empty would be a big turn off, but it turns out it's not such a big deal when you get used to it. This game's a lot of fun and will probably be my online fighter for a good while. If there's any one major complaint I have about the game it's that I think it would be a better game in general without the gems. They feel like a stupid gimmick, and a poorly handled one at that. I would also probably be bummed about the audio features online, but I play with the sound off most of the time anyway. So I'm a rare exception in not caring much about that.

  • 360 Version. Bought it, but haven't played it yet. Will update once I have had some time with it.

  • Genesis Version. What I remember about this game: Had characters named Ickybod Clay and Blue Suede Goo. That's it.

  • GBA Version. Another game me and my brother both picked up copies of to play each other. It was actually a really good port of SFA3 for being on the GBA. We managed to squeeze a bunch of hours into it, and the game was largely responsible for retaining our sanity on long car trips. One odd memory about the game is that my mom would actually play it of her own will (i.e. without me and my little brother goading her into it). That makes the only games my mom has willingly picked up to play herself Solitaire, Minesweeper, and Street Fighter: Alpha 3.

  • 360 Version. Initial impressions (given that I have no attachment to the Persona Universe): Seems like Blazblue lite. I need to play it more though.

  • Genesis Version. This was the first fighting game I owned. Despite the recognition the game gets for creating the fighting game scene it didn't do much for me when I bought it. I was mostly playing it by myself, and the AI was just way too hard for my little kid mind to handle. I still think the SF2 AI is some of the hardest in a fighting game.

  • Genesis Version. This was the game that got me interested in fighting games. It had ninjas (ninjas = cool to a little kid), the special moves were easier to understand how to do at that age, and my brother was now playing fighting games with me so I wasn't only against the AI. Those things pretty much sum up why it got my interest and SF2 didn't. To this day it's still fun to play, and remained my favorite MK game for years.

  • N64 Version. No other game spent as much time in my N64 as this. For a little kid whose only prior game in the franchise at that point was MK2 the sheer number of characters was intoxicating. I still have a lot of nostalgia for this game despite the flaws of it being more apparent at an older age.

  • N64, Gameboy Color Versions. This was the beginning of the downfall for MK. However the game was still alright despite being worse than the 2D games. It gets a lot more than its fair share of hate. I especially don't understand people who like the PS2/Xbox era games hating on MK4. Those games are far worse than it.

  • Gamecube, Xbox Versions. This remains my favorite fighting game of all time. I liked the 3 on 3 without switching like MvC2 (hadn't played a KoF game before this). I liked almost all the characters in the game, and I just had a blast with it. Many hours were wasted away making themed teams and fighting matches between me and my brother. It also sparked my brother's hatred for Balrog due to "his arms being longer than he is tall."

  • Xbox Version. I had owned SF2 before and was a pretty big Alpha 3 fan, but I had no idea a SF3 even existed before this came out. It was really a "holy shit when did that happen" moment. So I bought this mainly for SF3. It remains a gorgeous game, and I had a lot of fun with it. This game also had some weird ass version of Super Turbo where you could pick between the versions of the characters from every SF2 game. I didn't play with it that much. I do remember setting the AI from the lowest difficulty to the highest and not being able to tell the difference. Seriously, SF2 AI is ridiculous.

  • Xbox Version. This is probably my most played fighter behind CvS2 on the Xbox. Me and my brother really took a liking to it. I enjoyed the way Anji, Venom, and Baiken ("Bacon" according to my brother) played. It was one game where I really couldn't decide on a main. Also it's hilarious that Chip looks like a ninja version of Billy Idol.

  • Xbox Version. I had taken a liking to the SNK characters from CvS2 so I wanted to try out a proper KoF game. I ended up really enjoying 2k2 but not so much 2k3. I'm still not sure exactly what it was about the game that didn't sit right with me. Vanessa from 2k2 is probably my favorite fighting game boxer to date. My brother didn't take much to the game, but he did like playing Chin just because he looked like a gnome.

  • Wii Version. I got this from my brother once his Wii broke and he didn't feel like it was worth it to bother getting it repaired. Honestly I've barely played this game. That's mainly because it's on my Wii which isn't hooked up very often. As such I don't really have anything to say about it.

  • Xbox Version. Bought this because again it had some characters from CvS2, and I wanted to see what the Samurai Shodown games were about. It was alright, but nothing really special. I did end up really hating Mina and that annoying ass little baby ... thing ... (it's not human) that follows her around.

  • Wii Version. The Wii's only exclusive traditional fighting game is a fine one technically. The characters in it really didn't do anything for me. There's no Speed Racer or Samurai Pizza Cats so I don't know the Tatsunoku side at all. Also the Capcom side seems pretty underwhelming to me. I think it's really evident in the character selection that this was meant to be Japan only release and only got a western release once it was evident there was enough interest in it. Still I'm glad it did well for Capcom as it is a competent fighter which is a rare thing on the Wii.

  • Xbox Version. If MK4 was beginning of the downfall of MK than this was rock bottom. It was just a terrible game. Almost all the new characters were terrible designs (Kenshi is the exception), the new multiple style fighting system was terrible, only one fatality per character, boring stages, no pit fatalities, didn't even attempt having an actual boss ... just ... ugh.

  • DS Version. I got this when I was getting really excited for the release of MK9, and wanting to play an old 2D MK game. It's kind of weird that this is the first version of UMK3 I've owned considering I consider myself a pretty big MK fan. It turned out to be a really good port of UMK3, and is one of the best fighting games available on the DS. It also came with Puzzle Fighter, but I couldn't care less about that.

  • Xbox Version. Alright this was better than Deadly Alliance and ended up being the best PS2/Xbox era MK game, but the fighting system was still terrible. At least they brought back having a real final boss, multiple fatalities, and level traps that worked sort of like pit fatalities. Other than the actual combat my biggest complaint is having to drudge through the long lifeless feeling Conquest mode just to unlock characters. If there is a high point to the game it's Chess Kombat. That was a great idea, and they should bring it back.

  • DS Version. The previous one was alright and this had more characters so I got it. I guess in that way it's the better of the two?

  • Xbox Version. This was the MK Trilogy of the PS2/Xbox era. It gets a lot of well deserved hate for removing unique character fatalities, but I think it's still better than Deadly Alliance. Despite simplifying the multiple fighting style stuff from 3 styles to 2 per character, I still don't like the combat at all in this game. The PS2/Xbox era games were really only for super casual play.

  • DS Version. First of all, I don't know a damn thing about the anime this is based on. Anime fighting games tend to be terrible, but I had heard that this one was ok as a fighting game. I didn't have any other fighting games on the DS at the time so I gave it a shot. I don't regret it. I will say I'm not a fan of the 4 player versus mode. I prefer to keep it one on one.

  • Xbox, XBLA Versions. My brother and I loved playing this whenever we saw an arcade cabinet so getting the game on consoles when we could was a no brainer. We were 90's kids so the major appeal when we were younger in arcades was seeing all the characters we knew from cartoons in the game. It was a great game for messing around in. When the XBLA version came out I tried to get into it more seriously and utterly failed. However, it will always be a cool game to play with friends that don't know fighting games but do know wolverine, spider-man, etc ...

  • Xbox Version. If this game and its successor helped SNK make some money so they can keep working on real KoF games then I'm all for them. As for the game itself: Ehh.

  • Xbox Version. I got this for about $10 in a bargain bin and managed to squeeze about $5 worth of fun out of it. Really the only good thing I have to say about the game is I got to try the Red Earth characters which I had never encountered before. Really it just seemed like a very lazy thrown together mugenesque game.

  • Gamecube Version. I had a lot of fun with SC2 despite being mainly a 2D fighting game fan. It's one of my favorite 3D fighters behind Tekken 3. Me and my brother would mess with our friends by picking Astaroth and choosing the smallest stage without sides. I also thought Necrid was alright, but seem to be mostly alone in that opinion.

  • Xbox Version. I wanted to try the SNK version of this crossover series. It was neat seeing the SNK sprite versions of Capcom characters, and the before match dialogue was a nice touch. However, there was something that always seemed a little off in the gameplay.

  • Xbox Version. I already had a bunch of 2D fighters on the Xbox, but there was a short period of time where I really wanted a 3D one. This is what I ended up with. I mostly played DoA2 in the compilation and it was an ok game, but I feel DoA is the low standard for 3D fighting games. I've enjoyed just about every 3D fighter I've played more than DoA as long as they weren't just downright broken. And I mean broken as a game not broken as a character balance problem. The one good thing I have to say about the game is that the multi-tiered stages were always a neat little addition.

  • 360 Version. When the Xbox 360 came out this was the only fighting game available for quite a long time. I ended up with it just out of necessity of needing a fighting game for the system. I'm pretty sure that's why Tecmo seems to always put the DoA games out on console launches. Once VF5 came out I swore I'd never play DoA4 again. So far I've made good on that promise.

  • 360 Version. This was the first 3D fighting game I seriously tried to learn. At this point I was pretty sure this generation would be the death of 2D fighting games. SFIV had yet to rekindle interest in full disk release 2D fighters, and XBLA and PSN had yet to become the haven for re-releases they are today. I spent a lot of time with Goh and maybe this was a bad choice for a first character, but I never really got that good with the game. As a side note it's amazing how intimidating this series can be considering it only has 1 punch, 1 kick, and a block button.

  • 360 Version. This is another 3D fighter I tried to get more serious at. I really took a liking to Amy, who ended up being basically broken. That wasn't known yet when I first picked her. I've never gotten more hatemail just for picking a certain character. Of course I was never good enough at the game for any advantage she had to really matter. Not that it mattered to angry XBL players just looking for any excuse to rage.

  • 360 Version. This was the first 3D rendered fighting game on a 2D plain released on the 360. It was an attempt to create a western fantasy style game by a Japanese developer. Of course it still managed to have a cat girl despite that. It was an alright game and it's kind of too bad almost no one got a chance to try it. The best thing about the game is Watson. For those of you who don't know the character, imagine if Hopper from Bambi was a wizard and could also kick your ass.

  • 360 Version. So far this is one of the best full featured fighting games this generation. It took the base of SFIV and just went and made it better in about every way. I'm really pleased with the characters they added to the game from SF3. The three they picked are exactly the three I'd want. I'm not as thrilled about Arcade Edition as the original, but hopefully they'll fix the stuff they messed up with the new balance patch coming. Right now I'm on a slow burn with the game so I haven't played it as much as Vanilla SFIV, but I'll get there eventually.

  • 360 Version. This is pretty much the unofficial successor to the Guilty Gear series. ArcSys says Guilty Gear isn't dead but I've yet to see anything to back that up. Anyway this was a great game with a completely incomprehensible story. The Blazblue games also have some of the best online play in any fighting game this generation. On top of that Hakumen might just be my favorite fighting game character ever just based on his fighting style. In the opposite direction Tager might be my least favorite character to fight against ever, and I don't care if he is technically the worst character in the game. He wouldn't piss me off nearly as much if he couldn't magnetize you on block.

  • 360 Version. This is up there with MK9 and SSFIV as my favorite fighting games this generation. I actually managed to 100% the story mode in this, and I think the end result is I understand the story less than when I first started the game. Also Tager doesn't bother me quite as much in this version. Mostly because they gave Hakumen the most ridiculous poke I've ever seen in a fighting game which completely screws over Tager.

  • 360 Version. This is the first Tekken game I've ever owned. That's pretty much due to never owning a Playstation console. Despite that I had played a ton of Tekken 3 at a sandwich shop that had it set to free play (or was at least broken in that manner), and had also played a bunch of Tekken 5 on my college roommate's PS2. So it's actually the 3D fighter I'm the most familiar with. This is a pretty great addition to the series. The major complaint I have about the game is that the terrific Tekken endings were buried in the terrible story mode. They should have been available in the regular arcade mode.

  • 360 Version. After hating the PS2/Xbox era games it was really good to see them getting rid of the old multiple style fighting system. Also it played more like a 2D game than any MK game in a very long time. It wouldn't call it a great game but I really liked the direction they were starting to take the series back to. It was also the introduction to the style of story mode really made famous in MK9. More fighting games could be learning from these examples in story telling.

  • 360 Version. This is the most disappointing game I bought this generation. Everything I heard about the game prior to release was positive, but when I got it the game just seemed unfinished. I guess it should have been telling that SNK billed it as a dream match even though the series was in the middle of a story arc, and it didn't have characters from old games as a dream match should have. I'm hoping KoF XIII makes good on what this game should have been. If it doesn't I think I'm probably done with the series.

  • 360 Version. This is a great game that's marred by missing some features that were in SSFIV which should have been a no brainer to impliment. Chief among them is the missing spectator mode from lobbies. I don't know how any developer could think it's ok for people waiting to just stare at the lobby menu at this point. This also marks the 2nd MvC game that I've tried to get more seriously into and completely failed. The worst part is that I'm now terrible compared to most people online, but too good for friends who don't play fighting games and they don't like playing against me. I kind of wish I never really tried to learn the game and just messed around with it. Still it's probably my favorite game to watch on fighting game streams.

  • 360 Version. This is it. This is the MK game I've been waiting for years to come out. It single-handedly makes up for all the MK games I didn't like. It just barely beats BB:CS and SSFIV as my favorite fighting game thus far this generation. Though I'll always have a lot of nostalgia for MK2 this game finally edges it out as my favorite MK game ever. All the modes included in it are incredible. It feels like what MK: Trilogy would have been if a lot of care and effort went into making it a legitimate sequel to UMK3. I also really love how they managed to finally add Supers to MK with the sort of over the top violent style MK has in its X-Ray moves. They feel like they fit into the series just fine. At this point I'm really excited about the future of this series. The only complaint I have, and it's a minor one, is that they seemed to not get what a training mode record system is supposed to do.

  • XBLA Version. I had previously bought SSV and not thought too much of it. I had heard that SS2 is the most revered game in the series so I decided to give it a try. It's better than SSV, but I still don't really get the love for the series. Maybe it's just one of those things where you had to be there when it was new.

  • XBLA Version. SF2 had always been the entry to the series I wasn't really interested in, but this version really changed that for me. Honestly redoing the sprites was probably a small part of that, but the major thing that did it was the online play. I really got heavily invested in this game on the wait up for SFIV to drop. It's too bad that the popularity for it really dropped off after SFIV, but I think everyone could see that coming. It's also the only game I have S ranked. I don't really care about achievements, but it says something good about the game for me to have played it enough to naturally S rank it without really trying to.

  • XBLA Version. This was a game I'd heard a lot of good things about so when it came up for XBLA I made sure to grab it. The animation is really outstanding in it. It's second only to the SF3 series. However the sprites look the same quality as every other fighting game SNK makes. It's almost jarring seeing sprites that look like they could have dropped out of KoF animating in the way they do here. The biggest problem with the game is that the online play is absolutely terrible. It's unplayable online. Prepare for me to copy and paste those last two sentences into the next couple of games in this list.

  • XBLA Version. I bought this because I knew KoF 98 is hailed as the best KoF game by a lot of people. Personally, I still like KoF 2k2 better. Though I will say I really enjoy playing as Heavy D. SNK does seem to throw out a lot of really basic ports online without much effort put into them. This is no exception. They didn't even bother to translate everything in it into English. The biggest problem with the game is that the online play is absolutely terrible. It's unplayable online.

  • XBLA Version. KoF 2k2 is my favorite game in the series that I've played. So an updated version with more characters seemed like a no brainer to buy. Still the number of Kyo's in it is pretty stupid. I wish they had replaced one of them with Heavy D so I wouldn't ever have to load up KoF 98 again. The biggest problem with the game is that the online play is absolutely terrible. It's unplayable online.

  • XBLA Version. This was a PS2 exclusive game that I always wanted to try and never got a chance. So when it came to XBLA I picked it up right away. This is probably the gem of the SNK online fighting game catalog. Of course compared to the quality of stuff Capcom puts out their gem is more of a finely polished turd. I mean it's almost a bare bones package but you can see a little more effort went into this than the other SNK games. For one they actually bothered making the game widescreen. They did this through the same technique MvC2 used where they could widen the view and not the playing areas due to the 3D backgrounds. Of course they couldn't just do that with their other games, but given how little effort tends to go into them I was surprised they bothered with this one. The other area effort seems to have gone into was actually making playable online. While it's no where near as good as some other fighting games out there, but unlike SNK's other titles it is actually possible to get into a well playing match online.

  • XBLA Version. While I enjoy playing some Third Strike I never plan to get really competitive with it. People have just been playing it for too long and are too good at it for me to really get into it. So then why buy Third Strike Online Edition when SF Anniversary Edition works pretty well on the 360? Capcom has a lot of fighting games I love (CvS2, and SFA3 being chief among them) and I want to continue supporting them putting this kind of effort into bringing back old games. No one else really goes to the lengths they do and I hope they keep it up.

  • XBLA, PC Versions. This has quite possibly the worst online play of any game this generation. NetherRealm released such a great product with MK9, and have been working so hard in the community that it's just sad to see this product fail so bad in the online area. Still, it's just a rerelease compilation so it doesn't temper my enthusiasm for the future of MK much. I had mainly bought it because I wanted a version of MK2 running on current generation hardware, and to try MK1 which I had managed to have never played up to this point. In that way I got what I wanted out of this and am not too broken up over it.

    Note: Do NOT! buy the steam version of this game. It has terrible slowdown even in offline modes. I bought it to play with my brother while visiting him in the hospital, but it was just too terrible. It was a complete waste of money.