Computerplayer1

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First Ever Overclocking Experience...

Well I got bored today and decided to educate myself in the fine art of overclocking. Needless to say, my attention span for reading walls of text on the subject was a bit limited, and after 2 hours, I just decided to watch a couple of videos and print off a guide and do it that way.

The big thing for me was that I run my computer air cooled only, stock cooler on my CPU and all, and so I knew that even though my E8500 can easily get to 4ghz, I wasn't going anywhere near that. Even though I'm still a bit of a computer newb, I knew that in order to keep my CPU alive for any length of time, I wanted to keep the core temp under 70 C when under maximum load. Word has it on the world wide web that its best to keep something called the TJ Max at around 30 C (and I took that as meaning you want to keep the core temp 30 degrees below the CPUs max of 100 C).

So onward I trekked! First I wanted to go to the upper end of what I thought I might manage on air, which was 3.8ghz at something like 1.3 volts. That was a bit much as it was going to hit the 80s under a load so scratch that. Next I tried 3.5ghz at around 1.2 volts. This was much better, and I played around with the volts, eventually hitting the ground at around 1.15 volts without blue screening.

I wanted to get a bit more, so I finally fell on 3.6ghz at 1.15 or 1.2 volts (can't remember, but with "vdroop" I'm around 1.13 volts. This actually gave me temps only 1 degree above the 3.5ghz setting and so I think I will stick with this.

I'm not content with the temps entirely though. I idle around 42 C, and after running the hour long OCCT stress test (runs your CPU at 100% for the whole time, save a couple of points where it drops to 50% for a break) both cores top out at 69 C. These aren't bad temps at all, considering it's summer and my room itself is about 22-24 C.

I think I will take my good friend, Chilidragon's advice and purchase a good heatsink for my CPU. I have no idea how much of a drop that will provide, but if it can get me idling in the 30's and loading at 60-65, then I'm a happy camper. If it does even better, then awesome! I will then jack it up to 3.8ghz and have a happy party. As a side note, I should probably mention that I use Real Temp 3.0 to get my readings. My understanding is that the sensor on the chip itself is the Tcase, or the temp inside the cap of the CPU, and is usually 10C cooler than the core temp. Correct me if I'm wrong, as that would be a bad thing to mess up on haha.

Before I wrap this up, I have a question for all of my computer saavy pals. If the computer doesn't blue screen, is that a definitive sign that you're supplying enough volts to the core? May be a stupid question, but it'd be great to know! Also, any other OC tips, hints, or things to know in general, would be much appreciated!

Have a good one!

CP1

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Computerplayer1

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Edited By Computerplayer1

Well I got bored today and decided to educate myself in the fine art of overclocking. Needless to say, my attention span for reading walls of text on the subject was a bit limited, and after 2 hours, I just decided to watch a couple of videos and print off a guide and do it that way.

The big thing for me was that I run my computer air cooled only, stock cooler on my CPU and all, and so I knew that even though my E8500 can easily get to 4ghz, I wasn't going anywhere near that. Even though I'm still a bit of a computer newb, I knew that in order to keep my CPU alive for any length of time, I wanted to keep the core temp under 70 C when under maximum load. Word has it on the world wide web that its best to keep something called the TJ Max at around 30 C (and I took that as meaning you want to keep the core temp 30 degrees below the CPUs max of 100 C).

So onward I trekked! First I wanted to go to the upper end of what I thought I might manage on air, which was 3.8ghz at something like 1.3 volts. That was a bit much as it was going to hit the 80s under a load so scratch that. Next I tried 3.5ghz at around 1.2 volts. This was much better, and I played around with the volts, eventually hitting the ground at around 1.15 volts without blue screening.

I wanted to get a bit more, so I finally fell on 3.6ghz at 1.15 or 1.2 volts (can't remember, but with "vdroop" I'm around 1.13 volts. This actually gave me temps only 1 degree above the 3.5ghz setting and so I think I will stick with this.

I'm not content with the temps entirely though. I idle around 42 C, and after running the hour long OCCT stress test (runs your CPU at 100% for the whole time, save a couple of points where it drops to 50% for a break) both cores top out at 69 C. These aren't bad temps at all, considering it's summer and my room itself is about 22-24 C.

I think I will take my good friend, Chilidragon's advice and purchase a good heatsink for my CPU. I have no idea how much of a drop that will provide, but if it can get me idling in the 30's and loading at 60-65, then I'm a happy camper. If it does even better, then awesome! I will then jack it up to 3.8ghz and have a happy party. As a side note, I should probably mention that I use Real Temp 3.0 to get my readings. My understanding is that the sensor on the chip itself is the Tcase, or the temp inside the cap of the CPU, and is usually 10C cooler than the core temp. Correct me if I'm wrong, as that would be a bad thing to mess up on haha.

Before I wrap this up, I have a question for all of my computer saavy pals. If the computer doesn't blue screen, is that a definitive sign that you're supplying enough volts to the core? May be a stupid question, but it'd be great to know! Also, any other OC tips, hints, or things to know in general, would be much appreciated!

Have a good one!

CP1

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Computerplayer1

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Edited By Computerplayer1

Haha thanks for moving this. I didn't think I could chose to post this on the PC forum from the options in the blog post.

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subject2change

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Edited By subject2change

TJMax is the highest temp your CPU can go without melting pretty much and ideally you want to stay 30 degrees+ away from it if possible. I actually put my E8400 from 3.0 to 3.5 this weekend, I'll probably aim for higher eventually and if I burn it out I want to upgrade anyway so it won't be a huge loss :p

Also unfortunately my E8400/EVGA 750i read the temps wrong so I can't really tell what I am running at. O wells :p

And geez I just skimmed again, are you doing this on the pos stock cooler?

If you have the  case space; Coolermaster V8 will be your best friend.

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subject2change

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Edited By subject2change

Just tried pushing mine to 3.8 with my 1.34375v but it blue screened pushed it a little but more and got into windows and  blue screened. Went from 3.5  to 3.6 with no problems. Gonna run Prime95 now while I sleep.

Think once I get my GTX280 and new monitor I am gonna spend some time with different values.

Currently my screwed up bios is reading at 75-77 degrees at 100% and 58 or so at 0 load which isn't really higher than before; i'll probably lower the voltage a bit if I can to see how the temps respond. I've been getting high readings for the past year so I am not too worried just annoyed more or less.

I am even using a ZEROTherm Nirvana on this and its giving me these temps with Artic Silver 5 as well. And I am wayyyyyyyyyyy too lazy to reseat the CPU again as I know i'll end up rushing it and frying the mobo (again) and I never registered on EVGA and my warranty is up lol. When I go to a Q9650 or Q9550 i'll worry about temps.

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Computerplayer1

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Edited By Computerplayer1

@subject2change

Yah I'm running this on the POS stock cooler hahaha. It's so terrible, but it'll do the job until I buy a good HS. I think i'll be getting something like the Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro 92mm, or the Zalman 9500A.

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mikemcn

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Edited By mikemcn

I would love to see what happens if i overclocked my core i7, but id only mess it up and break the thing

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DarkGamerOO7

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Edited By DarkGamerOO7

I have a Dell PC with BIOS restrictions so I can't overclock my CPU, but I found a guide on the internet about how to get around that using CPU-Z and ClockGen, I got my 2.13 GHz CPU to 2.45 GHz to run stable, but after a week my computer would crash and continuously restart, so I had to reverse the overclocking.

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Edited By oDawg

One thing yer missing in the post is a discussion about memory settings. What did you set your memory to? Most often, blue screens come from memory issues, and not from cpu clock speed.

I would suggest, for others doing this, that you do not raise voltage so high on the first test. I'd leave voltage at its normal level, and see how high you can bring it up without increasing volts (volts = heat = what you don't want).  Your end result sounds pretty safe and good though.

To really call the machine stable, I would recommend downloading "Prime 95" and run a memory stress test (blend test i think its called).  This program will reveal little issues with memory, so turn it on, watch you temps for a couple hours, and if all seems good, leave it on overnight.  If it fails the memory test, there are lots of mem settings to play with, so don't get discouraged.

If you don't run and pass a test like Prime95, you are just asking for computer "wierdness". Ie: it will run crysis no problem for 5 hours, but then give audio errors while watching a DVD. Go figure, but happened to me.

Also consider the value of an extra cooler when buyin a new machine... Most often its better to stick with the stock cooler and buy a better cpu, than to buy a special cooler and a crappy cpu, but not always.... Just saying this because on my old socket 939 machine I bought a funky cooler than doesn't fit jack shit anymore, and I ended up wasting a lot of money that could have just gone into a quad core instead of a dual core .  

Also do some FPS tests, the difference between 3.4 ghz and 3.6ghz may not be much. Maybe lowering your OC a bit would reduce temps just as much as a new cooler - and give same performance in games... So many people get caught up in having the highest clock in the world, rather than practically optimizing their machine.