Dekkarra's forum posts

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Dekkarra

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#1  Edited By Dekkarra

When did you buy the digital version? If you preordered from August 15-17 there was an issue that Sony has since fixed, but you had to use a redeem code they sent through PSN with an XMB message.

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Dekkarra

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#2  Edited By Dekkarra

Well, there'll be a Corsair-ish type class in due time because Musketeer is, for all intents and purposes, probably next in line to be implemented. The guild for it is already in Limsa Lominsa, and has been since the original release.

As for me, Red Mage is a job I'd love to see in there. The way they implement it could be interesting, as they could go the route it took in XI and be the debuffer class of choice, or go in an attack DPS role, and almost have it like a Fencer with an épée type of sword, with enhancing magicks for the weapon.

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Dekkarra

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#3  Edited By Dekkarra

@potatomash3r: The Producer/Director has come out and said on several occasions that the initial 15-20 levels in the game are more or less meant to help introduce new players of MMOs the systems and the tempo of things. He says that they don't want to overwhelm new players with a bunch of abilities and wish to help guide them into more complex battles (The level 15~ dungeons are a perfect example).

They are making a LARGE push for players who have never played an MMO before, especially with the PS3 release, so the early part of the game may seem redundant to MMO veterans, it has its purpose, and it does it well.

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Dekkarra

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@devilzrule27: I was one of those people who came along after the pay wall went up. As I said in the OP, I followed along with the game as an outsider when the whole team restructure happened, and the announcement of what was then dubbed "Version 2.0". I liked what I saw was coming, but I also saw the improvements they had made to the original game client, and it impressed me enough to give them my money and play. The game that went down in November 2012 barely resembled the total disaster that it was at launch. It was playable, had some fun contents, and showed promise. It was still on a server system and game engine that were terrible, but they did all they could to get what they did out of it.

When they announced that the free period was ending in late 2011, he even came out and said something to the effect of "We know this isn't going to be a popular decision, and people will leave, but we have to do it." Did people leave? You bet. But a lot of people stuck around as well because they supported not only the incoming improvements, but also the team that was (at the time) working on content for 1.0 and ARR at the same time. Word got out about how things were improving, and people subscribed. No swindle. No suckering. He put everything out there, and people liked what they saw.

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Dekkarra

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I know that the Final Fantasy series has become quite the punchline in recent years, but in following along the buildup to the relaunch of Final Fantasy XIV, producer/director Naoki Yoshida has appeared to be that breath of fresh air that a company like Square Enix is in desperate need of. A guy who is brutally honest, and actually pays attention to potential customers/fans, as well as the gaming climate around him.

So, in this era of every other MMO under the sun going from subscription model to free to play soon afterwards, he has remained steadfast in his commitment to keeping FFXIV: A Realm Reborn as a subscription based game. In an interview with Venture Beat, he gave a particularly in-depth answer as to why they are taking this course, as well as commenting about other games in the genre.

Naoki Yoshida: There are many different types of MMOs. There are two big types or groups that we see. You have one group with games like your Rift or your Star Wars, which are very large-scale MMOs with established IP. Then you have your smaller MMOs, which are maybe new IPs that don’t need as big a user base to be successful. So we can start off with the big group, the large-scale MMO group, with your Rift, your Star Wars, your Guild Wars, your Age of Conan and The Lord of the Rings. These games all started out on a subscription model, or were planning for a subscription model when they were in development. Then, partway through, they switched to free-to-play.

Then again, you have games like Rift and Star Wars. Even though people have been saying that yes, there is this change in the market, everything’s moving to free-to-play, they still – up until recently – were developing a system that would be subscription-based. Even though everyone is saying the industry is going free-to-play, they still were developing these huge games with subscriptions in mind. Again, we’re not saying that one is better than the other, that free-to-play is better than subscription or subscription is better than free-to-play. But for a large game on that scale, what’s most important – more important than making a lot of money – is making a stable income, a stable amount of money over a long period of time. And so to develop a large-scale MMO like this, you need to spend a lot of time with a lot of resources and a lot of staff to make this game.

To do that, you need a lot of money, and to get a lot of money to do that, you usually need investors to invest in your game. Because you’ve spent a lot of money on getting this game ready and borrowed a lot of money from these investors, when you release the game, the investors expect to see returns. If your game gets a lot of users and a lot of subscriptions right away, your investors will be happy and you can pay them. But what happens if you don’t hit that number right away? You have a bunch of staff members waiting to get paid. You have a bunch of investors waiting to get paid. You have a bunch of contents that needs to get made because you have to have updates, but you can’t do it because you don’t have enough money, because you didn’t hit that number you were aiming for. And so what do you have to do? One option to get instant money is free-to-play, or selling these items. To get that money so you can pay off your staff, pay off your investors, and start making new content, switching to free-to-play, selling items, and using that money is one way to do it.

So why didn’t Rift or EA with Star Wars do this from the beginning? Why didn’t they start with free-to-play? There’s a reason behind that. With free-to-play, because you’re selling these items, you’ll have months where you sell a bunch of stuff and you make a lot of money in that one month. But it’s all about what happens during that month. Next month, the person who maybe bought $100 worth of items in the last month could purchase nothing at all. You don’t know what you’re going to be getting, and because you don’t know what you’re going to be getting, you can’t plan ahead. You don’t know how much money is coming in. If you can’t plan ahead, then you can’t keep staff, because you don’t know if you’ll have enough money to pay the staff next month.

With a subscription base, if you get maybe 400,000 members, you know that you’re going to have the money from that monthly subscription for the next month. You also know that you’re going to have 400,000 this month, and it’s not going to go down to 200,000 users next month. That type of jump really doesn’t happen with a subscription model. So you know that you’re going to have a steady income. Because you have a steady income, you can plan ahead further. You can make sure you have staff members to create that new content. By creating new content, you’re making the players happy. If they know this game is going to keep creating new content, they’ll continue to pay their monthly subscription fees. So rather than going for the huge $100-million-a-month hit that you might get with the free-to-play model, having that steady income allows us to provide a better product to the players.

Now, you have Blizzard and you have Square Enix. We’re the only two companies in the industry, basically, that are making MMOs with our own money. That gives us an advantage, because where other companies have to get money from investors and have to pay that back, we don’t have a lot of time to build slowly and be able to pay that back. Investors want their returns right away. With Square Enix and Blizzard, because we’re putting our own money into it, we don’t have those investors to worry about, and that means we can release something and maybe take a little bit of a hit at the beginning, but as long as we’re increasing the amount of people we have, then we’ll get that money and make the players happy. We’ll get into that cycle I talked about before, where we’re creating good content and have that steady income to keep the cycle going.

With version 1.0, even though we call it a failure, we still had a user base. During the time that we were developing this game, 2.0, we were able to increase the amount of subscribers threefold as well. Again, it takes time. It takes showing the users that we’re really into this and giving them that new content. But we’re able to see a rise there. That’s what we’re looking for in this. Again, we’re not saying—The market didn’t change. It’s that there are two different types of models. Choosing the model that’s right for your product and being successful with that is what’s important. We believe that the bigger the game, the larger the scale of the MMO, it’s going to be better for the game if it’s on a subscription model.

That’s why you see a lot of companies that chose the subscription model, that wanted to do what we were doing, but were forced to free-to-play. They didn’t go to free-to-play by choice, because if that was the case, they would have gone free-to-play at the beginning. They’d develop it for free-to-play, not full subscription, instead of being forced to go free-to-play. We hear a lot of people saying, “Star Wars is free-to-play now, it’s great!” But then you ask them if they’re playing free-to-play Star Wars and they say, “No, not really playing it.” Everyone talks about how great it is that it went free-to-play, but then you ask around and really, there aren’t that many people who are playing it since it’s gone free-to-play. If you spend all that money on a game ,release it, and it’s filled with bugs and you don’t have enough time to do your updates, people will leave. Players need that new content. Not being able to provide it is fatal. If they were able to produce as much content as players wanted, then people would have stayed there. We don’t really believe it’s a problem with the business model. It’s how that’s handled.

Credit Venture Beat

It's quite an insight into how Yoshida thinks, and I wonder what others think of this, very thought out answer on what is basically the state of MMOs nowadays?

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Dekkarra

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Think my mind just 'sploded. Best of luck to you in fatherhood and the professional life Dave!

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Dekkarra

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#7  Edited By Dekkarra

Square Enix re-released the trailer today, addressing the issue shown in the previous video with the lagginess.

Producer/Director Naoki Yoshida explains:

Hello. Producer/Director Yoshida here.
We’ve re-uploaded the TGS trailer to the web. 4Gamer, even though it was late at night, fixed the link for us. Many thanks. (Apologies that it may be an inconvenience, but I’ll avoid directly linking to it.)
Tomorrow we’ll be giving the links to each media outlet in turn; however, the official site will be updated after another round of QA checks early next week.
For the in-game battle portions, it seems that the bit-rate was lagging due to using a full HD uncompressed AVI taken directly from the PC. At the TGS venue the video was played right from the digital tape, so there were no problems; however, for the web version that was compressed automatically during upload, there was severe stuttering due to a reliance on computer specs and a high amount of lag. I deeply apologize to all of you who were looking forward to this video. (At the TGS venue there were no problems and it can be seen on the big screen.)
Also, for all of our current players concerned about differences between hair, facial expressions, neck movement, and other aspects, we are still in the midst of increasing the quality of everything, so please check out the game videos starting with the alpha version and later.
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Dekkarra

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#8  Edited By Dekkarra

@Animasta said:

@biospank said:

Fuck you Square! Give me FFVS13 instead but hopefully the rape simulator that is Tomb Raider will be good.

you know now that I think about it the fact that this game is going to come out before versus is fucking hilarious

They will have released this, XIII-2, and completely remake XIV from scratch in the time it's taking Versus to be anything other than an excuse for more patience. Nomura's entire team, as well as Versus, should be drug out back and shot.

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Dekkarra

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#9  Edited By Dekkarra

@FLStyle: Abyssea was basically the death knell of the "Traditional" way of leveling up in FFXI. You could, essentially, level from 30-99 with one or two days with an Abyssea alliance that stays formed long enough.

This is a blessing and a curse in some respects, as you don't learn the nuances of the new job, and unless you had leveled skills previously on another job, you would be terribly inefficient as you'd be a level 99 with level 30 skill levels. But if you have skills already pretty high from previously leveled jobs, it's a blessing as you just level up and you're already set.

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Dekkarra

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#10  Edited By Dekkarra

Had the same happen to me today as well, but I guess this is already being tended to. Thanks in advance I guess, lol

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