Why Did I Buy That?

A compilation of regrettable game purchases.

List items

  • I was looking for a game to help substitute for my Ace Attorney thirst and went for this, hoping to find a gem. The stories are generic to the point where absolutely nothing is original in the game, and the game is incredibly difficult to only those that possess nothing to touch the screen with. A chimp could get through this game after enough guesses, but he probably wouldn't even need to guess.

  • I was so young and naive. All I knew was that Nintendo Power had several elaborately detailed pages on the game, and the graphics somehow appealed to me. Although the combat is somewhat original, the battle mechanics are much, much too simplified. I would say that this game is geared towards children, but that would also mean that they'd be interested in journeying across huge, empty scapes of land, massive level grinding, and very dry dialog. The only redeemable quality in this game is the nicely crafted towns and villages, including the building interiors. Sure, quite a number of rooms are empty, but who can blame the people for moving out?

  • I can tell you exactly why I and everyone else that bought this, bought this. It's an RPG with some fairly nice look graphics, and that cover (minus the abbed-up boy) scream that this is an under looked gem. And while the characters are built up quite nicely and the battle has some unique features, it just doesn't go anywhere new that any other RPG hasn't already gone. None of the characters ever end up doing something unique, and the battles feel like incredibly slow and mundane tasks. If you're not accustomed to RPGs and have the patience for slowness, then I suppose this might be a title to consider getting, but this is not for a general RPG veteran at all.

  • I'm going to be blunt on this one. The reasons I wanted and got this game were as follows: I craved more Harvest Moon, I thought a portable Harvest Moon would be pretty awesome, and this was the first game that let players be women. These are no reasons to pick this up. Even if this was Natsume's way of recognizing that Harvest Moon's audience was primarily women, this was their way to capitalize on it as cheaply and immediately as possible. The GB Harvest Moon cuts down on two key aspects of the game: traveling outside the farm and every tiny bit of socializing. There's no longer a mountain to run to, and although there's a village, you can only cursor between shops to buy things. The only people you can talk to are the shop keepers, the priest, and the farm gnomes, meaning no sweet romancing for the farmer, and also meaning 95% of your time is spent running around your veggie and cow farm. If only the sickle had a suicide option.