CRPGs I've played

This is a list of all the CRPGs I've played in order of personal preference. I'm not saying they're all good, this is just a list of all the one's I've played. I tend to be the kind of player that likes exploration and a plurality of approaches over dungeon crawling and combat. I can also be a stickler over combat. It's not essential to me that the combat must be great, but if it's terrible, and the game forces you to do it a lot, it can often drag a game down for me. I've not finished every title list here so I've noted the games I've yet to complete.

List items

  • Giant Dad lives.

  • Where a lot of games suffer from certain lackluster elements, Fallout stands out as the solid, all around RPG. Great combat, a good story, and character choices that are so subtle, you may not even realize you're making choices. Sure, it's a safe pick, but it's the CRPG that got me into all this and the one I return to the most often.

  • Some of the finest level design in a game coupled with great thief-like stealth mechanics and some crazy cybernetic abilities. Also a neat story with some cool options.

  • Yes, the combat is weak. Luckily the game focuses more on the intricate narrative where the player is allowed to both play a character with a checkered past but also redefine him in a way that feels natural. It's philosophical musings are as strong as the finest works of any other artistic medium. And the best part is, the conclusions it makes are up to the player's interpretation.

  • This is one of those titles that has retroactively grown on me. For people like myself who don't like Jedi stories, this is a great deconstruction of the Jedies that explores some great moral ambiguities. The ending is rushed, making for an unsatisfying conclusion, but everything up to that is an improvement on the original.

  • Incomplete. The origin of Real Time with Pause combat. What makes the game shine is how you can approach almost every encounter in a number of ways that often allow you to avoid combat. Certain attributes, items and prayers to saints are just as valid options as pulling out your weapon of choice. One of the deepest CRPG experiences I've come across, and even after hours of play, I feel like I'm just scratching the surface.

  • Woefully unbalanced character systems and terrible, repetitive combat bring down this game. Still, there game boasts some super interesting quest chains and one of the most distinct RPG worlds that make up for its numerous shortcomings.

  • In a lot of ways, this is what Fallout 2 tried to be, and what Van Buren could have been. The heavy focus on faction gameplay provides a great sounding board for the player and the game does a good job of validating nontraditional play by giving dialogue based a lot more of a prominent role in the game. Still hampered by the Gamebryo engine, but it's the Fallout experience the fans of the first two have been waiting to play.

  • The (mostly) classless system and the completely open world allows for you to craft a compelling character and stumble around the world on your own adventures. The game favors giving you tools and letting you abuse them however you see fit, something lost on the later games in the series.

  • The Night of the Raven Add-in rebalances the game in some ways that stifles the creativity, but overall it retains a lot of what made Gothic memorable while adding better controls. Plus, there's only one major underground section to slog through, unlike the first game.

  • There are some chilling horror set-pieces and great character moments, but for every great moment of RPG goodness, there's an asinine forced combat encounter. Combat is atrocious in this game and the fact that it's so heavily forced in the later sections of the game make Bloodlines a heavily flawed game. I wish I could look past those flaws, because there's some great stuff here, but I can't.

  • Amazing combat, wonderful world manipulation and a crazy, fun world. An absolutely stellar RPG experience.

  • Yes, the opening is weak, the story is a bit too wonky, and you can see how incomplete the game is in certain towns that feel dismally populated with content, but Fallout 2 still retains a lot of what made Fallout so good and some of the areas such as Vault City and New Reno are better than any of the areas in Fallout.

  • The game's wonderful questing and world-reactivity make it a magnificent gaming experience. The opening dungeon is a pain, but once you get out into the world, the game is a blast. The ability to pause the action combat gives you that moment of reprieve to strategize amid a tough situation.

  • The game strikes a suburb balance between weaving a compelling story and giving the player the space to explore the world and move at their own pace. It's not so open that the story suffers, but open enough to give players like myself enough space to explore and stumble across a broad array of interesting sidequests.

  • Incomplete.

  • Some of the best combat in the genre coupled with a great character and skill system.

  • Incomplete. I'm not a huge dungeon crawling kind of guy, and that's all Ulitma Underworld is. But the deliberate combat and inventory management is like the sweet song of a siren on all my twisted survival fantasy longings. You'll be scraping for every inch as you delve deeper into the abyss.

  • This was my first actual RPG, but it didn't get me into them. I just ended up playing it a lot. After playing a lot of other RPGs, this one doesn't hold up as well, you can see the limitations of the console design on a narrower party system, but at its roots it's got CRPG in its bones. Dig into the details of what happens in a single turn, and it's a tabletop influenced RPG system.

  • Moves Infinity engine to D&D 3, which adds feats into the mix, giving you a bit more customization. It features insane multiclassing for people who are into that kind of thing. Also, the game world reacts to your party in a much more meaningful way than other Infinity Engine games. People comment on the fact I have a Drow in my party and my Paladin party leader won't take any rewards for any quests.

  • The price the game plays for putting story center stage is that the experience is a lot more linear and driven, meaning a lot less exploration and sidequests than the original. How much you like the story will probably color how much you see that as a good or bad thing. I thought the story was okay, so I like this game, but don't love it.

  • The sparely populated world and lack of exploration allows the game to focus a lot more on well-balanced, petrifying combat encounters and labyrinthine dungeons. Depending on how much you like the Infinity Engine combat, this is a good or bad thing. I'm leaning towards good, but I've never been big on dungeon crawling or combat heavy RPGs.

  • The combat is binary and boils down to brute forcing every combat encounter, which removes a lot of the strategic fun of good RPG combat. Still, the world behaves in such a compelling way and reacts to the player in some neat moments that there's a lot to dig about this game.

  • Fixes some of the rougher elements of the infinity engine games, but also takes a lot of inspiration from D&D 4e, making all classes equally viable and balanced, making the game a lot less compelling as a role-playing experience. Also lacks the character reactivity of Icewind Dale II.

  • A nice homage to the Infinity Engine games. The origins stuff is probably the most interesting as it does a good job of factoring in that choice in the game long-term. It's a bit more limited and the fact you can't roll a full party like the Infinity Engine games takes it a step down, but it captures a lot of what made the Infinity Engine games so memorable.

  • The Witcher is an array of nicely balanced elements. The open levels are never so open to be sprawling, but enough to give you some space to dig around in. There's not the nooks and crannies to discover like other titles, which is a tad disappointing. Also, the action heavy combat system actually works at having finesse and choice.

  • Incomplete.

  • Incomplete. I've not gotten far enough into this game to figure out the basics. Not even touched party or figured out how to begin finding any of the items of virtue (that's what I'm looking for, right), but I like the idea of having to be a champion of virtue, which makes the morality of a hero play out in the game, meaning you can't just go around killing and stealing in the name of RPG heroism.

  • Incomplete. Loving the combat, but not far enough in to see how interesting the questing and story works.

  • A little gem of a game that lets you play a Rashamon style story where you inhabit different characters involved in the same conflict. It doesn't do the best job of giving you feedback for your actions and the ending is abrupt, but it's an interesting, nontraditional RPG.

  • Incomplete. A cool little roguelike with solid combat, fun crafting and a neat world and aesthetic.

  • Incomplete. Combat drifts too much into cheap enemy design. Dialogue and story also feel rather bland. A shame because the core character and combat mechanics are solid.

  • Incomplete. A game plagued with so many poor design choices I've lost my desire to play it. Poor leveling system that is stingy with points added with some truly atrocious combat mechanics make this a supremely disappointing RPG.

  • VATS is overpowered, the ending is horrible and the game's environments get repetitive fast. Still, underneath it all are some really amazing micro-stories you can stumble across with Fallout's signature zany style. It may not be as mechanically sound, but it captures the spirit of Fallout.

  • Great story, but the combat and mechanics are crpg lite and some of the encounter design is downright awful. The final area might be the worst design encounter in a CRPG I've played.

  • I played this when it launched and the game was buggy and unbalanced, which might be part of why I came across not liking it. The game also punishes players for not foreseeing certain encounters they have no indicator they should be well aware of. Also, forcing players to use potions beforehand is a serious pain making for a lot of unwarranted and cheap deaths when a player should be able to just pop a health potion, especially since the game allows for very little flexibility in combat style while in the midst of battle.

  • Incomplete. Too ADHD for me. Constant looting and an incessant click-fest. I might give it another go at some point.

  • It's a great way to play a D&D game online with friends (which is how I played), but the UI is horrible and actively gets in the way of playing the game. There's some clever dungeon design/puzzle-puzzle solving throughout the game. But seriously, the UI just makes the game so cumbersome.

  • Incomplete. Gated leveling system and frustrating encounter designs made this game feel more like a chore than anything else.

  • Incomplete. I've tried playing this game several times, but I just can't get into it. Part of it is the weird difficulty bug I've encountered on multiple systems where enemies take an obscene amount of damage to bring down, but I think a bigger part of it is that the world sees fit to drop oblivion gates every couple hundred meters. The oblivion gates are horrible. They're bland, tedious to go through and make the world an eye-sour. I can't stand them. Such a terrible idea.