Completed Games

Every game I have played to Completion. Does not include all Achievements or Trophies.

List items

  • What a slog this was. Finding everything...ugh.

  • A pretty amazing time. I found out I was really, really good at this game rather quickly. I don't know what that says about me.

  • The first Hitman game I played, and the first to be completed. I fired my gun one time and obtained all Silent Assassin ranks.

  • My favorite Hitman game. Once again, 100% was pretty simple for me - I just have a knack for being an assassin, I guess.

  • One of many JRPGs to adorn this list. One of the better ones, and most worthwhile to complete. It's a pretty sad game.

  • The first console game I ever owned. Finally completed it several years ago, have done so three times total.

  • The ultimate sequel, completed for the first time several years ago.

  • Completed this surprisingly solid game a little after Tooie.

  • General Blue made the otherwise very difficult Boss Rush mode in this game a total breeze.

  • Fully completed both games in this package twice each. I really dig Final Fantasy II, but I think I'm the only one. Better than most games in the series.

  • I liked Final Fantasy II so much I just had to see what happened in the added content. I enjoyed that too!

  • So...this game. Pretty good, I guess? Completing it was a bitch though. Online functionality was never something I enjoyed dealing with.

  • I've completed this on both the PS1 and GBA, never the superior PSP version or the original SNES. I consider the DS version to almost be a different game. I enjoy it a great deal, it's pretty much the archetypal JRPG to this day.

  • Some people love it. I guess I kind of understand it, but overall it wasn't for me. I love Gilgamesh and really enjoy Galuf, but everything else was pretty dull. I completed that GBA version though.

  • While not as good as everyone claims, it's still an understandable classic. The game is easy and the characters really become broken, plus playing through the World of Ruin segment TWICE due to save corruption may have left a slight bitter taste in my mouth. Yet I have to acknowledge its strengths.

  • This is my least favorite game I've played to completion. I like almost nothing about it, and nothing stands out from other JRPGs to make it special. At the time, I may have appreciated the graphics more, but I first played it many years after the fact. One thing I dislike is the ability to make all your characters the same, something this game reveled in.

  • It's the Plan 9 From Outer Space of video games to me, a game so bad that it's insanely memorable and bonkers. It's the weirdest game I've ever played - even moreso because I don't think the game developers really intended it to be as weird as it ended up. I completed it once, and will probably never again, but it will never be forgotten as the total piece of rainbow garbage it is.

  • A complete about face from the last two entries in this series, this game is fantastic, a sheer tour de force for everything great about Japanese RPGs. It's the first RPG I ever beat, and still probably my second favorite. It got me into my favorite video game genre, and games in its style have dominated my gaming ever since. I've completed it twice, so far.

  • Here's a weird one. I enjoyed it when it came out, but never beat it. Then when I finally completed it, I didn't like it. But as I've thought about it and watched video of it, I've come to appreciate it more. I really love the Sphere Grid, the characters are better than I first thought, and the combat system is just fantastic. But there are definitely parts in the main story that are just terrible - multiple hours that make you go UGH. Still, I appreciate it much more than I used to.

  • This is definitely the game on this list I was most glued to a guide for. Completing this game on one run took an insane amount of micromanagement and is one of my most proud gaming achievements. Of course, the game itself is pretty dumb, magnifying a lot of FF10's flaws while introducing some of its own, and it brought back the Final Fantasy V job system, which I never really enjoyed to begin with. Still, it has its moments, and I don't regret completing this one.

  • A game that I enjoyed more as I played, it starts of super slow but gradually ramps up. Completing it took hours of my life and the final battle with Yiazmat was a disaster, but the game itself is definitely worthwhile.

  • Oh Golden Sun, what a mystery you are. Why such a simple, rather generic RPG like yourself has such a following has never made much sense to me. Beyond the Beyond has so much in common with you, you are like twins, yet you are beloved while your twin is reviled. You are strange, yet not all bad.

  • Ah, the sequel and conclusion. What can I say except more of the same, with even less interesting party members and places to visit. I prefer the first to this one, since that game actually had villains, but this game is really necessary for closure.

  • Completing this game in 2011 was like going back and watching an old silent film. Fascinating at times, enjoyable too, but man did it make me appreciate things like working maps, cutscenes explaining where to go, and post-hit invincibility frames.

  • Now THIS is more like it. I was blown away by this game, even though I first played it in 2011. What a fascinating piece of gaming history - and a totally fun game to boot! They should totally make another Zelda game in this style. I mean, why not? There's nothing else like it.

  • This is one of those games that if you grew up with you think is the best thing ever, and if you didn't, you gravitate toward Ocarina of Time. I grew up with Ocarina of Time. Still, that didn't stop me from loving this one - I bought a Super Nintendo in 2000 specifically to play this game, and I never regretted it.

  • Doing a Link to the Past style Zelda with only two real buttons was this game's only flaw. Having to pause every 9 seconds to figure out what item you need to equip got tiring, and, quite frankly, is the main memory I have of this title.

  • My favorite video game of all time, and the game that got me started in the medium. I'd played games before this but none had - or ever have had - the power of Ocarina of Time. Gaming has been my main hobby ever since. I've completed this one over ten times, so often in fact that I've lost count.

  • Other than Ocarina of Time and Final Fantasy IX, this game shaped my gaming habits more than any other. Before the release of this game, I was ridiculously stoked: I knew the precise moment of its entry into my local game store and was frustrated by the fact that I was a minor and could not actually afford it, though I was promised it by my parents. When I finally laid my spoiled little hands on it, I was so disappointed I've never bought a game on release since (except Ace Attorney games). As I've gotten older I've grown to appreciate it much more as a work of art, a maudlin tale of a land doomed to destruction. It's really a great game, but I will always remember it as one of the biggest disappointments of my childhood.

  • A short little game that I thoroughly enjoyed, and may be my favorite handheld Zelda. I still need to play A Link Between Worlds, but until then, Minish Cap holds the crown.

  • This and the next few were all completed on the various anniversary collections released on the sixth console generation. A classic action game, to beat is to complete.

  • I've never heard anyone argue that this isn't the best classic Mega Man title, and you won't hear any from me.

  • Another solid entry.

  • I started wearing down here in my first attempt to complete the series, and never finished any beyond this. Now, I think this is one of the better entries of the NES series.

  • Probably my favorite action game soundtrack.

  • These games were a staple of my boarding school days. Fun action RPG with Pokemon style collecting elements and great graphics for the day, I completed it many years later and found it to still be a good time.=, though rather challenging to complete.

  • Another staple of my boarding school years, this was everyone's favorite Mega Man game. At the time I'd never played any Mega Man games OTHER than Battle Network, so hey, what did I know? I completed it many years later, and found this to certainly be better than the original, but maybe not quite as good as its sequel, who knows. I never managed to complete that one.

  • I've a confession to make: I've never finished any Metroid games other than this. I've had Super Metroid since 2000 and haven't beaten it. I've had Metroid Fusion since its release - haven't beaten it. Yet something about this one let me finish it in style, with 100% completion. I'm a weird guy.

  • When I completed this it was a bootleg ROM called Earthbound Zero, dagnabbit! It's definitely the most unique RPG of its day - the only modern day one with no demons or anything of the sort, and, bizarrely, it's still kind of unique today. The developers threw the difficulty curve out the window at some point, and its random encounters are nothing short of onerous, but if you can make it past that, it's a worthwhile trip.

  • A game I actually obtained in cartridge form by sheer luck way back in 2000 when I got my SNES. At the time I appreciated its weird sense of humor but hated JRPGs. Now, I appreciate its quirky combat, the interesting music, the dystopian vision of America, and of course, its bizarre one-liners. There exist better RPGs, but Earthbound is totally one of a kind.

  • A ROM hack I was so hyped to play, I ditched three games to oblivion to try it. What surprised me most was how different it was from Earthbound. Gone were the visions of American towns, replaced instead with quaint country atmospheres and bizarre fascist pigs. Then at the end the entire game goes apeshit, placing you in a fascist amusement park New York and pitting you against old enemies from its predecessor. It was an unsettling, strange journey, that I need to revisit.

  • A phenomenon in which I was totally caught up. I still love these games for their nostalgia, and the fact that I can talk to anyone in my age group about them. The later games have done less and less for me over the years - these days I need a better story to enjoy RPGs - but these two are still impressive to this day. For years I didn't even realize they were RPGs, and saw no connections between this game and games like Dragon Quest or Final Fantasy. To this day, they still feel different.

  • To this day it's the only Zone of the Enders game I've played. I beat (completed?) it so long ago that I don't remember any real specifics other than at the time I thought it was completely amazing.

  • I tried to avoid completing it, but thou must. The original console RPG, and a fun time if you're feeling grindy. Not very long, but didn't need to be.

  • I am one of the few, the proud, who have finished this game. I say this because it is maddeningly difficult, a product of an era where games were still overshadowed by their quarter-guzzling arcade cousins. Still there is a great deal of satisfaction to be gained by besting its insane RNG.

  • This game. It's the first true Japanese Role-Playing game. The standards of the genre were set here. Not Final Fantasy, not Dragon Warrior II. Here. It's the first one where I truly felt like I was on an epic quest. It's pretty generic for modern times, but man, I can only imagine what it must have been like to play this in Japan upon its release in the late 1980s.

  • There's something innocent and fun about this incredibly short, simple platformer that's caused me to randomly finish it a number of times.

  • You know something? Finishing this game still counts as one of the most grueling gaming experiences of my life. I don't think I was cut out for 2D platformers, but I can at least tell people: "Hey, I've beaten Super Mario Bros." And that's something. I'm one of the crazy people that prefers this to Mario 3.

  • A much easier game than its predecessor, it's just a classic. Everything about it was fun. Thank god we got this instead of the REAL Super Mario Bros 2.

  • For years, I used a GameShark to beat this. It was one of the first Game Boy games I had, back in 1997 I believe, and I could only finish it using cheat codes. Not anymore. I have defeated this game legitimately, and am pretty proud of it even though it's nowhere near as difficult as the original SMB.

  • LET'S GET SERIOUS. This game is bizarre, fun, and memorable. It's another game I randomly got a cartridge for in 2000. I have no idea what possessed me to buy the five Super Nintendo games I bought then, each for between $5 and $20, but they've turned out to be some of the smartest investments in my life. This one? What can I say about it? There's an evil wedding cake.

  • I don't remember why but this was a game I was really hyped for before it came out. It didn't disappoint me and I consider it to be a totally replayable classic to this day. Again - in my mind, I disassociate it from more traditional RPGs, even though I know it totally is.

  • Another classic that I've only really played the one time. I remember so much about this game though that I feel like I've played it a lot more.

  • It's a really influential game for me, one that I've compared similar 3D platformers to ever since. I think I disliked the Uncharted series a fair amount because I kept thinking to myself: why can't I play this like I play Prince of Persia? It's the pinnacle of its style of 3D Platforming.

  • One of my favorite games. I know I say this a lot, but this time I mean it. Probably my third favorite RPG, this has it all: great characters, a fascinating world, awesome unique elements, reasonably fun combat, real-world parallels, and pirates. What's not to like about pirates? I have a Let's Play of the game on my Youtube channel, for more of my thoughts on it.

  • I am a Michael Jackson nut. Just, lock me up and throw away the key, anything with that man's influence is automatically something I enjoy. He was the greatest entertainer of all time, and this game has 16 bit versions of my favorite songs (Beat It, Billie Jean, Smooth Criminal, and Bad - literally four of my five favorite pieces of music). Of course I completed it, please.

  • Collectathons are still the best way to do 3D Platformers. This is the ultimate collectathon. For years it was my favorite video game, before I came to the more mature realization that Zelda: Ocarina of Time was a superior experience. Still, I have a great deal of love for this game. It's the only game I've ever played for eight hours straight. I remember ringing in the Year 2000 while playing this. Good times.

  • The first game I ever got that wasn't educational, with my Game Boy in 1995! I only actually completed it a few years ago, and I found it hard (again, 2D platformers not my best genre) but worth it!

  • If I were to make a Top 10 List of my all time favorite games, it would be dominated by games from this series. I adore them so much, they are the only games I go out and buy day one, lock myself in a room, and play until they are finished, with only 20 minute breaks between each case. I am a fanatic for them, and my obsession began with this one. I've completed it three or four times at least, and while some of the later games trump it in terms of cases and story, it still has the best soundtrack.

  • I think it's the worst game in the series, but for all of its faults (mostly stemming from that 3rd case), it's in many ways the bravest. It tackles some extreme subjects, ones that hit me personally very close to home, and the final case is the ultimate test of player choice.

  • For days after completing this I tried to pick my jaw up off the floor. I'd never played anything like it, never experienced such a shocking connection with characters in a video game, never seen a villain so horrendous as Dahlia Hawthorne. The finale is still the best finale in any video game ever, bar none. I have a hard time revisiting this one since the thrill of not knowing was part of what made it so special, but I try to every so often.

  • After the masterpiece that was Trials and Tribulations, this was a little bit of a letdown. The new characters weren't as interesting as the old cast, I missed Gumshoe, Apollo was only ok, and the cases themselves seemed somewhat weaker. Yet it was still an Ace Attorney game, and in the end it provided the kinds of twists I can only get from a member of its series, so I still think quite highly of it.

  • The first of two Edgeworth focused spinoffs, this managed to top several games in the main series with its interesting and varied cases, and lack of filler. It's the first game where each and every case mattered to an overall story arch, a tweak to the formula I appreciated since all of the most memorable cases have something to do with an overall story.

  • This took everything great about the last game and ramped it up to 11, somehow - incredibly - nearly matching the glory of Trials and Tribulations. It's definitely the second-best game in all of Ace Attorney, with Blaise Debeste (Bansai Ichiyanagi) as one of the all-time great villains in the series. Even more impressive, it manages to combine the stories of 3 (!) earlier games in the series into one cohesive, plausible tale which has an ending to match the moral difficulties of the second game. The English translation patch is quite good, too.

  • A return to form for Phoenix Wright, it didn't quite match up to Edgeworth 2 but was certainly better than Apollo Justice and Edgeworth 1. I'd rate it slightly lower than the original game - while I loved the new detective, there was just something missing without Gumshoe, my favorite Ace Attorney character.

  • This is unquestionably the game I've spent the most time with. I've completed it several times. My most notable playthrough involved the Advanced Vampirism mod and had me siring every non-Dunmer on Vvardenfell, then proceeding to murder every last Dark Elf, thereby turning the Dark Elf home territory into a massive vampire den.

  • It's not a game I like. When I finished it, there were some lingering good feelings, but as the years have passed, all my memories come back to the painful last area.

  • I consider this complete, as I have finished a massive campaign on the hardest difficulty possible, with a character commonly considered impossible. It's really quite excellent, with a unique artstyle and a great deal of faithfulness toward its magnificent source material (my all time favorite book).

  • It's certainly influential and enjoyable, but I wish I'd played the remastered version with voice acting. It really needs it.

  • I don't remember why I picked this one up and completed it. But I enjoyed it.

  • Another JRPG, but one with a very different tone than most. The early part of the game is very happy-smiley, with the main characters on an adventure just to see the world. When the main conflict begins, it's roughly 8-10 hours in, but by then, you have a solid grasp of what the world is like. It's an interesting strategy that, I think, works, as it builds connection with your eventual damsel-in-distress in ways that games using similar plot devices don't.

  • It's similar to Lunar 1, with a story with neat connections between the games, but to be honest I don't remember too much of the details of this one. I remember really liking it, and the battle theme being one of the all time greatest in an RPG, but for the life of me, remembering details is tough.

  • Another really great game that's overlooked. I have a complete Let's Play of it on my Youtube channel, and you can watch that for my complete thoughts.

  • An epic, is what this is. I love the fact that it's got a huge, interesting cast and a very fleshed out world. It's superior to every more mainstream RPG other than maybe Final Fantasy IX, Xenogears, and Skies of Arcadia, yet this game got so little love on release it's very difficult to acquire now. Sad.

  • Weirdly enough it's my favorite Rockstar game. I think it spoke to me in particular because I actually went to a boarding school and can relate to a few of its themes. That, and I'm a sucker for a cast full of named NPCs.

  • There's something about this game's style that drew me in more than other games in the franchise, to the point where I actively wanted to complete it and see what I'd get.

  • It's one of the only pure collectathons on the PS2, a funny romp that had a lot of style and heart.

  • Pure 3D platforming at its finest.

  • Pure open-world, mission based 3D platforming at its finest.

  • Open-world mission-based 3D platforming that is only slightly less fine than its immediate prequel.

  • Man, I don't know. It embodies a lot of things I don't like about Japanese RPGs - the whole friendship is magic thing, the ludicrous character design, the despicable rival (Riku) who they want you to care about but who comes off as a total tool, and a lousy love interest that gives no incentive to care. But it's still got Disney, which saves it.

  • In a lot of ways, this is a spoof of other JRPGs. It pokes fun at nearly every stupid thing in the genre. Your main character? A total asshole who doesn't come off as abrasive. The main female lead? Way more competent - in every way - than the hero. The mentor? A total screw up. The soundtrack? Pure jazz. What? It's hilarious and memorable, with EVERY FREAKING NPC IN THE GAME as party members. That hot chick? Recruit her. She probably sucks, but hey. That total badass? Yeah, recruit him. He's still a total badass. The chick whose face you never see because she's always in a helmet, yet she bosses around all the other total badasses? Yeah, broken. Just a lot of fun.

  • Cannibalism. It's a theme you don't see often.

  • It's a game of maybe's. Maybe I take the Prince of Persia platforming and make it linear and boring. Maybe I take the Gears of War combat and remove all the gore and chainsaw guns, while giving the enemies more HP. Maybe I take a serial killer, make him make jokes about shooting people in the head, then try and make him sympathetic in cutscenes. Yeah, I've beaten this game three times, yet Nathan Drake still manages to be my all-time least favorite video game character. What a total piece of dirt. The game though...is a maybe.

  • It has my favorite video game character, Dycedarg Beoulve. Otherwise, it'd be just pretty good. SRPGs are an acquired taste and a type of game you really have to be in the mood for. I love the political side of this game, but am not the biggest fan of the demonic aspect. I think it would have been more interesting had they just kept it political.

  • Solid Zelda game, though I don't like it as much as the N64 entries. Sailing could get tiresome, and the dungeons were very weak. Still an interesting world and amazing art direction.

  • Some really clever additions were overshadowed by its occasionally cumbersome control scheme, but this was overall a solid Zelda game. Flaws involve the music being terrible, sailing being worse than Wind Waker (Jolene sucked), and having to go through the same floors a lot in the Temple of the Ocean King.

  • What Phantom Hourglass should have been. Train gets a lot of flak, but I enjoyed it immensely and it tapped into my inner child. Music was amazing, dungeon designs were way better than Phantom Hourglass, and I loved how it made Zelda an actual character. Still, the control scheme had its flaws. I'd need to replay Minish Cap to know if this is my favorite handheld Zelda, but it's up there.

  • It's the best Dragon Quest game I've played so far. The chapter system is really cool and helps you get to know each character, the music is amazing, and it's really quite deep for an NES game.

  • The first PS2 game I ever got, the first T rated game I ever owned, and a game I always have looked at as the first time I ever was conisdered "mature enough" by my parents. It was my nemesis for many years and I tried beating/completing it practically every two years on the nose, only to fail time and again. Finally, in 2017, I did it. Completing this might mean the most to me out of any game on this list.

  • Middle of the pack for my favorite game series. If I had to rank them, I would rank them: Tribulations, Kenji 2, the Original, Dual Destinies, Investigations, Spirit, Apollo, JFA.

  • A lot of people think this game is just "there," but I think it's still a really fun Mega Man game. Charge Man has a great theme, and the Protoman/Wily levels are really fun.

  • Didn't really like the new Rush powers, but everything else was solid as always. NES Mega Man games are all great times.

  • Refers to the challenge mode, which was among the most grueling gaming experiences I've ever done.

  • This is much better. Better setting, better gameplay, better story, and the collectables weren't so bad.

  • Completing this right after AC2 might not have been the best idea, as burnout set in midway through and slowed my progress. Makes small steps forward in gameplay and fun factor, but takes a big step backwards in story.

  • Beat three times: 1st run on hard, maxed all items. 2nd run with Dairy Bastard costume, speedrun in less than 4 hours. 3rd run on God (Very Hard) mode. It says something that in all these runs, I never got bored.

  • A good game that isn't as epic or interesting as its console counterparts, but is a fun, quick diversion. It's the perfect example of a "one-day" game that can be completed in one or two quick sittings.

  • Completed twice. This is my favorite of the Zero Escape trilogy, largely because Ace is definitely the best villain. While I appreciate its sequels, this is a game you can thoroughly enjoy all on its own.

  • When I beat it the first time shortly after its release, I thought it was a masterpiece, a brilliant piece of subversive storytelling. I still think it's excellent, but the second time I played it seven years later I enjoyed it far less - without the initial shock factor of some of the reveals, this game loses much of its charm in a way 999 doesn't. Also, Alice might be the first character design in a video game that's actually annoyed me. I'm usually not the type to care or notice that sort of thing, but...what were they thinking?

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