The Super Famicom Super Also-Ran Super Sequel

Because I ran out of room on the original list.

Simply put, these are SFC and SNES games I've added to the wiki. Frankly put, most (but not all) of them are generic garbage that deserved to be forgotten. Don't say I didn't warn you.

(The horror... it continues...)

List items

  • The sequel to Olivia's Quest; essentially a series of animated jigsaw puzzles that tell a story about a master thief in green, his French policeman girlfriend and a mysterious airship named Aryol.

  • Some kind of Popeye board game/brawler/platformer hybrid. Its insanity defies all attempts to describe it.

  • Baseball game #15. The site glitched out when adding this one, so there's a whole bunch of now-deleted dupes in the drop-down menu. For all the fuss, it's just another SFC baseball game.

  • Sumo game #3. This box art confuses me: I wasn't aware sumos were allowed chest hair. Wouldn't that create an opportunity for the opponent?

  • I'll add every damn Hebereke game to this site if I have to. The world needs to know about drunken penguins in beanie caps.

  • Mahjong solitaire fun with Hello Kitty and friends. Man, this has to be the easiest way to make licensed games.

  • More mahjong solitaire. Why not. The more the merrier.

  • A shameless clone of Super Mario Kart, featuring comical bike riders. One of them's even flipping the bird in the intro. I wonder why it didn't get localized.

  • Just looking at this box art, you'd be forgiven for thinking this was a JRPG created by Mad Magazine. Down the World?

  • A compilation released along with an exercise bike that could play certain SNES games. Suddenly the Wii Fit Balance Board doesn't seem so dumb, does it?

  • "Fishing to Bassing" sounds like a very long angling encyclopedia. Or maybe a very short one.

  • Pachinko sim #2. This pachinko game has three Super Famicom sequels and 25 (no, for real) PS1 sequels. If anyone tells you that the SFC was the worst with Japanese shovelware...

  • Mahjong game #15. But it's the first one for this particular list, at least?

  • Namco produced a lot of "Family" and "Super Family" sports games for early Nintendo consoles. It's more a convenient naming structure than anything. They all seem fairly generic and beneath the big Arcade developer, honestly. This one has racing.

  • Yeah, I don't even know. It's like Bomberman except they give you a gun, which sort of undermines the whole strategic aspect. Oh, and you're also a chicken or a frog or something.

  • Go game #4. Hey Vincent, you ever eaten a Honkakuha burger? It's a tasty burger!

  • Someone evidently saw Konami's Mystical Ninja games and figured the hero ought to be more ninja like. It plays like a cartoon brawler, but it's as fast as Legend of Kage.

  • Mahjong game #16. This is a gaiden game to a series where you raise feisty schoolgirls to be brilliant young women, except now you're playing mahjong against them. I've added over a hundred of these obscure Super Famicom games, but I can't think of anything more Japanese than that.

  • The Japan-only sequel to Super Caesar's Palace. Earning a whole new pile of fake money is still every bit as enthralling.

  • This is the mountain bike game that came with that exercise bike (see above). Both it and that Speed Racer game (which already had a page) were sold separately the following month. For whatever reason, its playable characters all look like something out of a cyberpunk B-Movie or a 90s "How to Draw Radical Japanese Animes" art tutorial book.

  • Are you ready for some generic football games tonight??? There were a whole mess of ESPN games released around this time. I guess Sony were trying to break off a piece of that EA Sports monopoly.

  • That hot 1994 sci-fi prison break banger featuring Lance Henriksen, Ernie Hudson and Killian Raine Smith. Apparently it got a pretty bad licensed game. Who knew?

  • Gotta love these weird Japan-only basketball games. This one isn't based on an anime and seems entirely within the US's wheelhouse, so it's a mystery why developers Human didn't bring it out there.

  • Go game #5 AND Shogi game #6. Another double-bill of inscrutable Japanese board games.

  • A word salad title, but this was the second in a long campaign of Konami's to try and outdo Compile at their own Puyo-stacking game. Everything before "Taisen" is the anime license they utilized to draw people in.

  • Mahjong game #17. More vaguely pornographic mahjong from everyone's favorite eroge artist U-Jin. There's no nudity here, but they sure do poke at Nintendo's boundaries.

  • Another video game adaptation of the Japanese equivalent of the Game of Life. This one's set in Edo period Japan, between the 17th and 19th centuries. Did you know that there's only two people born in the 19th century that are still alive? Possibly fewer by the time you read this.

  • Pachi-Slot sim #3. This one looks to be covering antique pachi-slot machines.

  • Mahjong game #18. "Karakuchi" is what they put on liquor bottles to indicate that it has a dry flavor. I would hazard a guess that a mahjong game that references alcohol is probably for grown-ups.

  • It's another weird board game RPG thing like Dokapon. I tried for fifteen minutes to figure out that title with online translators. Here's what the more literal ones spat back: "I'm home! Searching for an extra helping of hero".

  • A soccer game. It's the Japan-only sequel to Super Goal! 2. That's about as exciting as I can make this one. J-League! Whoo!

  • More soccer! We actually already had the page for this game's sequel but no-one thought to add the original. It's highschool-tier soccer too, sort of like the Koushien series and its highschool baseball.

  • I thought this game would be about bullfighting, but that's "toreador". This is just Mahjong Solitaire again, albeit with a twist.

  • Pachi-Slot sim #4. Slot machines and girls in bathing suits: that's the level of artistic merit these games are shooting for. Despite what the box art says I suspect her name isn't actually "Zack".

  • There were like five of these hanafuda games in 1994. Maybe Nintendo had an anniversary that year and invited a bunch of no-names to make hanafuda games to celebrate the company's card game legacy. Another curious fact: everywhere else on the web calls this game "Gionbana", but I'm guessing this translation is correct. I mean, it does have "Hana" right there.

  • Pachi-Slot sim #5. More Pachi-Slot machines, more scantily-clad Japanese women awkwardly posing in front of them. I wonder if, while developing Super Castlevania IV and Mystical Ninja and many other bona fide 16-bit classics, Konami was enviously staring at these guys and their generic quickie cash-in gambling sims.

  • Nice try attempting to make fishing sound more exciting than it is.

  • Shogi game #7. This game is full of shogi problems, of the like where you set up a board specific way and try to force checkmate in a set number of moves. Don't like shogi? So tsume.

  • More fishing. This one's all about the seabass. Kick his ass, seabass!

  • This is the first Wagyan game - a platformer series where a dinosaur screams at monsters to stun them - that I've personally added to the wiki, though I've worked on at least four skeleton pages from this franchise. I can rarely get past the first level, since they all seem to end with some Japanese word game I have no hope of understanding.

  • An extremely odd competitive horseracing game. Like someone decided to make Super Mario Kart with equines.

  • Pachinko sim #3. This one had its own pachinko dial peripheral making it impossible to play with an emulator. Such a shame that Super Famicom Pachinko Game #918 is forever lost to us.

  • Can't get enough Hebereke. This one's like an isometric R.C. Pro-Am running game. It's kinda fun, though really tough when playing against a CPU opponent.

  • Shogi game #8. Published by Virgin Interactive? Apparently they had this weird period where they were publishing games exclusively in Japan.

  • That's such a great Japanese name. It's a Fire Emblem-y type of strategy RPG with a sort of Phantom Brave element where most of your firepower comes from monster units you have to summon into being.

  • Our only wish, To catch a fish, So juicy-sweet! I dunno, man, it's more fishing. I guess this genre started to pick up as adults bought more Super Famicoms.

  • I didn't know it at the time, but there was a very old PC MS-DOS series in which you design castles and then manage the local rural areas Civilization-style for the resources and money to construct them. This is a Japan-exclusive SFC adaptation of that series. It's never not weird to see a PC MS-DOS port when working on these SFC pages.

  • Baseball game #16. I added the first of these Ultra Baseball games a while ago. They're all part of the same series that brought us Baseball Simulator 1.000.

  • This is the third Yokoyama Mitsuteru Sangokushi game, a strategy sim series based on the Sengoku period that's unlike Nobunaga's Ambition. This one's a board game spin-off that's more like Dokapon. There were a lot of Dokapon-likes that year.

  • Anime fighter. I remember cleaning up the entire YuYu Hakusho franchise - there were a lot of games based on this anime, turns out - but apparently this particular one slipped everyone by.

  • Mahjong game #19. It's another game featuring that luckless high-schooler getting ripped off by his mahjong-playing hoodlum companions. It's also the last verified Super Nintendo game release of 1994!

  • Like Hashire Hebereke, this is a R.C. Pro-Am top-down style racer with a bunch of cartoon characters running around. Was there any other game that let you play as Huckleberry Hound or Snagglepuss? (P-probably?)

  • A France-only advergame (for Danone, of "Mmm, Danone" fame) that's a little like Lost Vikings but a lot crappier. We don't have a whole lot of games on our wiki that only came out in mainland Europe. Gee, I wonder why?

  • I'm not sure if I should've added this one. Its US release was definitely cancelled when the movie it was based on sank like a rock upon release, but the sources I read seemed split on whether the European version was cancelled too or eventually came out in 1994 at some point. It's a generic licensed superhero brawler.

  • It's not often I get to add a game to the wiki that was made before 1980. I'm surprised it didn't register, but then I'm not sure it ever left Japan. Needless to say given that it's on this list, it joined Space Invaders with a SFC revamp many years later.

  • Horseracing Sim #6. This one had some nice pictures of horses at least. Was the intent to pretend that horseracing in Japan is all about the beauty and majesty of our equine friends and not a semi-legal means to gamble?

  • No idea why the initial NCAA Final Four game was missing: we have many of its modern sequels. Maybe, just maybe, college basketball isn't as thrilling as it sounds?

  • I'll admit, I half-assed this page a bit. There's almost zero information on it out there; not even Japanese Wikipedia has a page. I just know from playing it for five minutes that you raise a schoolgirl in much the same way as you would a princess in other games. Kinda weird, but these raising sims were a big thing for a time.

  • Mahjong game #20. It's a game that employed a manga artist for its art work, sort of like Akira Toriyama with Dragon Quest or Chrono Trigger, only it was spent on another mahjong game I'm sure everyone sorely needed.

  • Quiz game #3. The second edition of everyone's favorite psychological quiz game. They didn't even bother with graphics this time, instead giving you a bunch of Winamp visualizations.

  • A spin-off of the Data East fighter game series which is absolutely, unmistakably, legally not Street Fighter. They put Atomic Runner Chelnov in this one as a secret boss. Excellent.

  • The most disappointing thing about this bass fishing game is that the fisherguy in the Love Boat-style circle on the box art looks a lot like a Japanese Mario, and I'm sure they could've had fun with that.

  • Sweet potatoes, do I not understand what this game is at all. Space Harrier with a giant bird? I'm into it.

  • Horseracing Sim #7. Oh, that is so classic road.

  • Racing game. Like the first, it's all about street racing with a lot of drifting. Apparently, the Drift King is a real guy and is also the consultant for Initial D. I need a cool nickname like that. The Wiking? Ehhhh...

  • Pachinko sim #4. Heiwa is a company that makes the real-life machines, and this game is designed to help people win at the real-thing by practicing on the virtual versions. That seems kinda desperate, huh.

  • Shogi game #9. First rule of Shogi Club is: Zzzzzzzzzz.

  • Horseracing sim #8. Wouldn't it be great if this was about aging gangbangers revisiting their old 'hoods, fighting all the yuppies and hipsters that have moved into the newly gentrified properties? Nope, it's just horses again. Neigh to that, sir.

  • Baseball sim #17. I swear, no-one else can be bothered adding these Famista games. On the site that has harbored a deep affection for the original R.B.I. Baseball, no less.

  • When Super Tetris 2 + Bombliss came out a few years prior, Bullet-Proof Software either figured that they could capitalize on the unexpected success of the explosion-heavy Tetris variant, or that they could cynically re-sell it without the Tetris part. Either way, it's more Tetris with bombs.

  • Mahjong game #21. Every internet source seems to refer to this game as "Super Jangou" but I have no idea where they got that translation. I checked with resident Japanese translation expert Pepsiman, and it appears that the character in question is "suzume", or "swallow" - the bird for which Mahjong is supposedly named. Mystery sorta solved!

  • Horseracing sim #9. The funny thing with all these dry and boring horseracing sims is that I'm often listening to MBMBAM while working on the wiki, and they can't stop talking about horses either. Or ghosts.

  • Horseracing sim #10. This one appears to be more overtly about helping Japanese people gamble on the ponies, so I appreciate its honesty at least.

  • It was hell tracking down information for this thing. A JRPG that is clearly biting the steez of Link to the Past (though why wouldn't you?) the hero is apparently named for a mascot for a brand of stationery. At least, that's what I was able to gather from a handful of Japanese hobbyist sites. It would explain why a toy company like Tomy would be publishing it.

  • Mahjong game #22 AND shogi game #10. Always exciting to get a double bill of soporific Japanese board games.

  • Gnomes push a bunch of blocks around in this combination of Puzznic and Sokoban. It might get difficult as hell in the later stages, but you wouldn't want to let those cute little guys down.

  • Don't mind me, just adding more astrological BS to the wiki. Hell, if every other Super Famicom game is about helping you to gamble, why not have one that tries to predict the lottery for you too?

  • "I'll take Super Famicom games for 500, Alex." "A Gundam spin-off that re-imagines the mechas as cute little anime robots, and then puts those robots in a Sengoku-era themed strategy game." "What is the most Japanese thing imaginable?" "You got it."

  • Mahjong game #23. Like the other "Super Real Mahjong" game, it's Arcade softcore porn mahjong without the porn. Doesn't sound super real to me. (People really played porn games in the Arcade?)

  • While it purports to contain a collection of different card games, it actually only has this one mode where you have to build a wall out of cards and make Mexico pay for it.

  • Mahjong game #24. Had to confirm the title of this one - many sites list it as "haisei". Paizei means something very specific in Mahjong, though, so I went with that. As always, it's a lot of work for what is a completely banal mahjong sim with animes in it.

  • Mahjong game #25. "Shodan" keeps popping up in titles for shogi and mahjong games, because it means first-rank: the initial tier for any professional board game player or martial artist, meant to indicate that these games are for beginners. Why it also ended up being the name of a malevolent AI is anyone's guess.

  • Baseball sim #18. The simulation in the title refers to how hands-off this game feels, with the player simply selecting spots on a grid to aim for when pitching and batting.

  • Pachinko sim #5. It's actually a competitive pachinko game, featuring those loveable big-headed Compati Hero Series goofs. Whoever heard of competitive pachinko?

  • Oddly, this Super FX game was missing from the site. It has every right to be forgotten, as an uncontrollable mess that moves ten frames a second, but there were barely a handful of polygonal games for the SNES and I figured we'd have pages for them all already.

  • Horseracing sim #11. I really don't know what to tell you about all these horseracing sims. Not even horses care this much about horses.

  • Shogi game #12. Remember a few minutes back when I said "Shodan" meant "first-rank"? Nidan means second-rank. That is literally as exciting as shogi trivia can get.

  • Go game #6. "Go Sennin" apparently translates to "Go hermit". That seems like a little too much "biting the hand that feeds", surely?

  • A JRPG sequel to 1993's Elfaria, set around 100 years later. I'm still into that art style; very Mad Magazine. Why couldn't this guy be the one behind Dragon Quest's monster designs?

  • Mahjong game #26. Kiwame means "extreme", though how someone could use that word to refer to Mahjong with a straight face is anyone's guess.

  • For one brief, amazing moment, the Super Famicom's stampede of horseracing games were briefly replaced with these motorboat racing gambling sims. They play identically, though it lacks a feature where you can breed two prizewinning motorboats together for a pedigree jetski.

  • A turn-based RPG apparently based on Ancient China. "Shiki" means something very specific in terms of written Chinese history. Naturally, I can't find a thing about the game anywhere on the internet.

  • The developers of this one just said "Fuck it, here's every type of gambling in one game. This is all people buy Super Famicoms for these days, right?". Dice, cards, horses, motorboats; anything above that you could bet on is in this game. (Though, oddly, no roulette or slots.)

  • It's my great pleasure to announce that this will be the last of Cream/Nichibutsu's series of F1 games to grace this list. This is the fifth one from this series I've added. How much F1 does anyone need?

  • Pachi-Slot sim #6. Remember Pachi-Slot sim #4? It's the sequel to that. (What do you mean, "no I don't"?)

  • "DunQuest" might be the laziest title I've ever seen for an RPG. Looks like it might be a neat action RPG though, sort of reminds me of TG16's Dungeon Explorer.

  • Shogi game #13. Saikyou means "strongest", which seems kinda presumptuous.

  • A text-based visual novel with photos of actors getting spooked about creepy schools. Seems potentially interesting, if you can read Japanese. I can't.

  • Baseball sim #19. Hudson's huge baseball series only saw two North American localizations, and so far almost all the rest have had to be added to the wiki by yours truly. Given this is an annual series, it's getting hard to come up with new ways to talk about them.

  • Mahjong game #27 AND Shogi game #14. It also features Reversi and Gomoku, two games played with Go tiles. Once again, a wise developer tries their hand at a board game compilation to present an option that's better value for money than all the standalone shogi and mahjong games out there.