Completed

Everything (I can recall) that I've completed. I don't have a single definition of the term 'completed' - every game on this list I have at least beat the story or all the single-player modes, some of them I've collected all the points in, and a rare few I've truly completed in the sense of seeing, doing, and collecting everything.

List items

  • PC version, first adventure game I played and still my favorite in the genre. George Stobbart is a favorite as far as characters go.

  • (Legal) freeware through the ScummVM program on PC. Played it in 2009 which is a good fifteen-or-so years after its original release, but it was enjoyable and I liked the sci-fi setting.

  • Limited Edition on Xbox Live Arcade. 400-point bargain during a Christmas sale at the end of 2009. Great script and pirate setting, but still prefer Broken Sword.

  • A defining game for me, and one I've played through many times - was absolutely enthralled with it. Unfortunately, my Dreamcast packed in a while ago.

  • Great RPG with a fun battle system, though the story isn't stand-out. Spent close to 150 hours collecting all the achievements (including three playthroughs), kept me entertained throughout.

  • Played and beat the Dreamcast and Xbox versions numerous times and got the best of both worlds: Japanese voice acting and save importer on the Dreamcast and sharper visuals and performance on the Xbox. Different to the original (more focus on action) but equally good.

  • Much like Vesperia: fun with an exciting battle system, but the story isn't up to much (in this case a rip-off from Final Fantasy X's). Enjoyed but never got around to the New Game .

  • Game Boy Advance version. Had played about a third of it on the PlayStation port but the load times killed it for me. The Advance version is quick and it looks better on the small screen. Absolutely love the job system.

  • Fairly unpopular in the grand scheme of the series, but a favorite of mine. Had played the sci-fi themed VII and VIII and enjoyed both while suffering from "get to the end and inexplicably fail to complete it" syndrome, so IX must have done something right.

  • 360 version. A lot has been said about it, but I liked it. Far too slow at the beginning and the part where it "opens up" isn't really that exciting (a choice between progress the story or undertake generic missions), but the new combat system is fantastic and it did enough to carry me through to completion - something many games in the franchise failed at. Currently attempting to finish the achievements.

  • DS version. All bad puns aside, it's an RPG that stands the test of time. Audio/visuals work great, even on my DS Phat, and the gameplay and story hold up. I don't recall any dull spots in a story that was paced fantastically. Thoroughly enjoyed collecting all the endings and playing through the added DS content.

  • Another RPG that gripped me enough to play through multiple times, customising your Jedi and allies was really cool. Not particularly a fan of Star Wars, but it was an excellent (if sometimes buggy) experience. Would really like a proper sequel, don't care for the MMORPG that's on the way.

  • Bit of a desperation purchase during a 360 RPG dry spell. Awful characters and a run of the mill story, but a very interesting combat system that mixes the catch 'em all of Pokemon with a grid system (this is probably the saving grace that pulled me through).

  • Not revolutionary, but a master-class in making old-skool RPGs on a modern console. Connected with the characters a lot although a strong villain was absent. The dreams are an excellent concept, and the combat is solid with enough twists to keep it from being boring.

  • Remarkably cool, and a little bit easier than the punishing original on the Dreamcast (which is why that game isn't on this list). Not to say there is no challenge, but I managed to unlock most of the characters with a bit of practise, which was very satisfying.

  • Started the original Dreamcast version and didn't get too far, was consumed by the Gamecube update. I see this as a game that isn't particularly impressive when you break it down to the component parts - dated technology, unexciting combat, etc. - but one that's greater than the sum, mainly thanks to the excellent air pirate setting and all the exploration.

  • A great strategy/RPG hybrid. Very stylish on the Advance screen and a proper challenge.

  • Didn't have the impact of the first (Western) one, but the ability to play on after beating the game appealed to the RPGer in me. Probably played it more than any other Fire Emblem as a result.

  • Didn't like the 3D visuals so much, but it does turn-based strategy just fine which is what I was looking for.

  • Strong opening from the franchise on the DS. Not quite as enjoyable as the Advance games, but a bit easier (hence why they aren't on this list).

  • This game is basically an on-rails light show. Had a lot of fun during the short time I played it, but it's a bit of a strain on the eyes (take regular breaks!).

  • Quirky little puzzle platformer, the first original Xbox Live Arcade title if I remember right.

  • For what it sets out to achieve, it's the closest I've played to a perfect game. Beat the adventure mode but not all the challenges. That would be a feat and a half.

  • The peak of the franchise as far as I'm concerned, an all round fun platformer.

  • A forgettable grid-based strategy game. Might have been fun if there was any kind of online community.

  • Very important in my life for leading me onto the real guitar. Spent hours on both the PS2 and 360 versions, my crowning achievement being to "Kick the Bucket" on the Xbox version.

  • A good follow up, but I had less interest after playing hours of II and putting in the practise on strings. Managed to beat it on Expert, but not the super-song this time.

  • Fun brawler and it was a real blast to revisit all these Marvel characters, but it wore thin by the time I finished it.

  • Shooters are a rare sighting on this list. Beat single- and mutli-player campaigns on Insane - tough, but not overly so if you don't make rash moves. Played a lot of the online too, which burned me out when it came to the sequel.

  • A real hidden gem; limited print run and limited appeal to anyone who isn't into Astro Boy. I have no real interest in the history of it, but this is an outstanding scrolling beat 'em up. A proper hardcore challenge on the highest difficulty, even with maximum upgrades.

  • Played the demo and was blown away. Fantastic atmosphere and story, so much so I didn't seem to mind that it was an FPS! Just missing the one achievement (win on the highest difficulty), doubt I'll ever return for it.

  • A great example of a meticulously crafted universe. Lots to do and lots of fun...

  • ... but it was blown away by its sequel (even if it does have same problems, yes, the scanning!). Thought I'd miss the RPG elements, but it's much better off with its action emphasis.

  • Played on the Xbox Live Arcade (only alternative would be a crippling visit to eBay). The finest example of its kind and a game that excels in all areas. Another one that I'm missing a single achievement in (which is a spoiler so I won't mention it).

  • Had played this before Symphony, which is what got me interested. Quite different games, but I appreciate the heavy RPG element to Dawn of Sorrow (more than I appreicate the subtitle having to abbreviate as DS).

  • This is a deep game. Very deep. Loved it and would like to play more, but its a game that demands attention (which I don't have for it at the moment). Beaten once and close to beating twice, may go back and finish up and try the expansion.

  • Which is better, Morrowind or Oblivion? Ever so difficult to call. Either way, this was the first properly big PC RPG I was introduced to (though I played it on Xbox), and it blew my mind. Beat it once, candidate for game I've created most characters in before immediately quitting and creating a new one.

  • A little scaled back from Morrowind in terms of size and complexity, but still deep and remarkably good looking (even now I like how it looks). Controlled levelling for maximum multipliers was a bit of a drag, but that's the perfectionist in me.

  • The best expansion pack I can remember. Sheogorath was a laugh, and the isle itself a bright and vibrant addition to Oblivion.

  • Old-skool done new-school done right. Well worth the 1200 point price tag. Metroid/Castlevania is the obvious (and apt) comparison, with a bit of Metal Gear aesthetic mixed in.

  • Not that I'm interested in the "are games art" argument, but if I was, I'd be pushing this. Beautifully designed: a touching, minimalist, and epic game.

  • Always wanted to play the N64 original (which I did eventually on Wii VC), so this was the next best thing. Fun RPG in the Mario style, not much else to say.

  • I was crazy about Pokemon as a kid and spent many hours with both versions...

  • ... Gold/Silver was really a highlight in that it had two regions to explore...

  • ... and I quite liked Crystal since it had a guaranteed encounter with Suicine, one of the pain-in-the-ass 'legendary dogs' that wander the map...

  • ... by Ruby/Sapphire I still enjoyed the gameplay although the Pokemon it introduced I forget...

  • ... Diamond/Pearl sparked a reinterest in the series for me, the most I'd enjoyed since Red/Blue, but I got a little caught up in the competitive stuff (IVs/EVs/etc.) and eventually burned out on it.

  • A complex RPG with some similar concepts to Pokemon in the collection/customisation. Cyber-space is a great setting, and I'm convinced that it could have been as good as Pokemon under different circumstances.

  • Came free with a 360 bundle I bought, and did co-op with a friend. Shooters aren't my thing, but it was fun enough on co-op and to pick up some points.

  • An ace game and the best pseudo-adventure game franchise in recent years. This installment had some particularly thrilling cases (as well as a hilarious character and over-the-top drama in the music).

  • More of the same, which is just fine (not as great an impact as Ace Attorney though).

  • By now the formula wears a little thin, but the character and case quality is still there (Godot's story was great).

  • Played on the 360 Arcade, very addictive. But little incentive for me to keep going. Another one that would benefit from a more active online community.

  • Lots of fun as local multiplayer game, but a little lacking in weapons and features...

  • ... which is where Armageddon comes in. Loads of wacky weaponry and a more challenging single-player campaign.

  • I love Chromehounds. Shame it died, loved designing mechs and testing them out. Strange story: I bought a second copy of Chromehounds as the first disc started developing a crack (I was afraid it would shrapnel inside the console). The second disc went the same way, and that was when I stopped playing.

  • Story mode was cool and playing as Link was a blast, but I really wasn't much good at it.

  • Probably the most hyped I've been for a game that I would go on to play rarely. Not an indication of me not liking it, but my house isn't that big and setting everything up is a chore. I beat solo-guitar on Expert and played little else, but it was fun when I did wheel everything out.

  • The Wasteland is one of my favorite game worlds. VATs got a tad boring after a while, but the world and it's crazy sense of humour is ace. So much to see and do.

  • Admittedly, this game gives you infinite continues, so it's on this list more due to perseverance than skill.

  • I never was that keen on the stealth thing, except for Metal Gear Solid. If nothing else, it goes all out.

  • Replaying Metal Gear Solid with pretty Gamecube graphics with MGS2-style controls was a lot of fun. All those classic (and long) cut scenes have a bit more kick, and made even more over-the-top.

  • It was cool when you could walk into a shop with no preconceptions about a game, relying only on the box. It could go either way: luckily it went well with this one.

  • Very cool setting with some nice story twists, combat was a bit repetitive but enjoyable overall.

  • Free and blatant about the points (multi-player was fun for a few rounds).

  • I don't remember a lot about this game, except it had you raising creatures and that I completed it. And I think it had some sort of New Game mode that had much stronger enemies. I recall it being weird but also enjoying it.

  • Bark at the Moon... yeah, that was difficult.

  • Pretty easy as far as Guitar Hero goes, and not at all good value for money, but it had some tracks I love (Synchronicity II anyone?).

  • After getting the true ending, I still can't make a lot of sense out of BlazBlue's story. Regardless, it's a cool (and very technical) fighting game that I plan to put some time into online if I renew Gold.

  • Pretty simple and a little light on content, but big on charm. Seriously, The Maw looks to me like something straight out of a Disney Movie. A fine first effort from Twisted Pixel, who would go on to make 'Splosion Man (and are in the process of doing Comic Jumper).

  • Real easy 1000 points and great online game...

  • ... topped by it's sequel, featuring the most realistic tennis system in a game yet. Single player career was good, but online is where it's at. I once played the world number one online (I myself was hovering around 300-500) and lost respectably, two sets to one.

  • I never understood why Heavy Weapon wasn't more popular. Simple to pick up, bosses in a real old-skool style, and a great visual style. Online survival mode was a favorite, holding out for sixteen minutes at best with a four-player team.

  • Racing is another rarity here, but Paradise City was awesome. Never got bored completing all the jumps, smashes, and billboards, but which I had more opportunities to take it online.

  • Not a huge Aerosmith fan, but it had some cool songs on it ("All Day and All of the Night" by The Kinks and "She Sells Sanctuary" by The Cult are my highlights).

  • I know you can't really 'complete' a football game... but I got all the points, so I did.

  • Another tennis game! Plays surprisingly well. Was in the top ten online for a time, I reckon I was only beaten genuinely (there were problems with the opponent quitting and you getting the loss) five times or so. I like to brag about my achievements on tennis games, sorry.

  • Flags aren't cool, but most of everything else in Assassin's Creed is. Free-running is cool. Hidden blades are cool. Leap of faith is cool...

  • ... and the sequel is even cooler. And a game that genuinely has no major faults (in my opinion). Another game I gladly played for hours on end, happily picking up the points. Roll on the third.

  • Had to force myself to beat this one. Not a bad game per se, but a bit of a poor choice on my part. The multiplayer was far better, had a lot of fun with that.

  • I loved playing Table Tennis, even if it is basically a (really) souped up tech-demo. Would have played it even more if the online game wasn't heavily favored to players who slow the game down to snail's pace.

  • Cool little game, great visuals for the Advance. Fun enough, but didn't convince me to play the sequel. And one other thing: I hated the fact that you'd waste an attack if an enemy was killed earlier in the round (e.g. three party members attack Wolf A, party member one kills Wolf A, but instead of attacking Wolf B, party members one and two do nothing for that turn).

  • A real classic. I had it on the Megadrive (Genesis) and currently on the Wii Virtual Console, think I've beaten it on both versions.

  • Just like the Crash Bandicoot franchise, the second is my favorite with the Sonic games. Let's hope the upcoming 2D revival is at least decent.

  • Best in the series so far, does everything right as far as I'm concerned.

  • My least favorite due to how rigid the drifting controls feel, but the two-in-one car was a nice twist.

  • Second to the DS version in the franchise. It's a Mario Kart game done very well on a home console.

  • Horrible wheel peripheral, but the game itself is great. The (free) online took a lot of my time after beating all the single-player races.

  • A great arcade tennis game that was spoiled by an inconsistent online component. Offline it played like a dream, although I prefer the sim-based system of the Top Spin games.

  • As Virtua Tennis 2 (the PAL version of Tennis 2K2) on the Dreamcast. The best Virtua Tennis has been in my opinion, although I might be appreciating the newer games less because of Top Spin.

  • Not a game I bought, but completed it a couple of times on co-op at a friend's house. Good fun despite my general dislike of the FPS genre, though I couldn't play it for too long without getting nauseous.

  • 3D fighters get a pretty bad rep. Can't say for sure if that's fair as I've only played one, but it was a cracker. Exciting stages that are interactive and always moving, a deep item crafting system, and the mad dash to collect the last Power Stone you need to transform.

  • Like Little Big Adventure, a game I bought without pretense. Turned out to be a fantastic purchase that would eventually lead to...

  • ... many hours of Melee! Played the hell out of this in single- and multi-player, and it's most likely the most time I've spent on a game with no RPG elements.

  • Again, a fantastic game by any standard, but I didn't do much with it beyond the guitar mode on expert for the same reasons as the first game.

  • Really great concept: challenging puzzles in highly stylised package and a new kind of story-telling. So far I've only passed all the worlds without collecting every puzzle piece, trying to avoid using a guide.

  • I see it as the other side of the coin to Braid: darker and more sinister in atmosphere and with a bit more platforming, but equally well-designed puzzles and excellent design. A tad pricy for a short game, but a great game by any standard.

  • Bargain buy on XBL Indie Games. A five(ish) hour RPG in old-skool style with some genuinely original concepts regarding battles and random encounters that all RPG developers should take note of. Also packed full of satire, references and commentary on the genre and games within it.

  • Finally beat it, years after first playing it. Abadoned attempts on the PC version have been put to bed now I've completed the iOS version. And it was a great game, though the plot wasn't as strong as the first game.

  • Very funny adventure-meets-RPG. Crazy story, writing and characters; simplistic mechanics that are accessible and engaging enough to stave off boredom.