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Renegade_v2

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Renegade_v2

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#1  Edited By Renegade_v2
HazBazz said:
"Renegade_v2 said:
soduku"
nope"
Picross DS

i won
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Renegade_v2

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#2  Edited By Renegade_v2
HazBazz said:
"Oh I'm too fast for you bitches

A bit obscure, I think
A bit obscure, I think
"
Piccross DS
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#3  Edited By Renegade_v2
HazBazz said:
"Oh I'm too fast for you bitches

A bit obscure, I think
A bit obscure, I think
"
soduku
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Renegade_v2

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Renegade_v2

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#5  Edited By Renegade_v2
Yoshi_trips said:
"

I feel bad for the idiots that will vote for McSAME.

  

"

"al qaeda have been going back to iran..........."

LMAO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  God. here we go. Weapons of mass destruction part 2. the fuckers not even elected yet and he's already looking for an excuse.

God bless America, and if this Moron gets elected, were gonna need the blessing
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#6  Edited By Renegade_v2
ManMadeGod said:
"Renegade_v2 said:
"ManMadeGod said:
"Riddler said:
"Holy shit.............i feel bad for ManMadeGod right now..........

renegade almost fucking wrote a book up there. Have fun reading that and fighting over it. im off to play some Halo"
He copied and pasted that stuff from all over the place:
Google parts of it and you will see the sites he got it from."


and..............your point?

you asked why i didnt like McCain. and i posted a few of the reasons. you want more? or are you out of excuses for voting for that inbred trailer trash already?

"
Like, come on dude. I enjoy talking to people like Patchinko who are able to state what THEY think. But you just copy & pasted stuff. Why can't you tell me, in your own words, why you don't like him? Do you really expect me to read a bunch of quotes from senators?"

so....since you cant prove any of those things i listed wrong, youre not gonna reply and instead avoid them cause theyre "not my words"?? umm you asked reasons bro, i gave them. If you cant face the facts dont try to argue in the first place.
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#7  Edited By Renegade_v2
xruntime said:
"Guys - stop spitting out profanity against McCain - if you want to attack him, do it when it's relevant. Next thing you know, the other side will call all the Obama supporters immature idiots."

or terrorists, or communist, or .............Oh wait.............
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#8  Edited By Renegade_v2
ManMadeGod said:
"Riddler said:
"Holy shit.............i feel bad for ManMadeGod right now..........

renegade almost fucking wrote a book up there. Have fun reading that and fighting over it. im off to play some Halo"
He copied and pasted that stuff from all over the place:
Google parts of it and you will see the sites he got it from."


and..............your point?

you asked why i didnt like McCain. and i posted a few of the reasons. you want more? or are you out of excuses for voting for that inbred trailer trash already?

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#9  Edited By Renegade_v2
ManMadeGod said:
"Patchinko said:
"ManMadeGod said:
"Renegade_v2 said:
"ManMadeGod said:
"O I love it, pulling the race card! Hahahahahah! If you don't vote for Obama you must be racist! And you want to talk about logic!
Dude, if you want to talk about the issues then lets go otherwise go troll someplace else."

race? wait.....how come the rednecks are the first one to pull out the race card before us? are you running out of excuses already?

no one brought up race before you mentioned it on your post....and even when you said your "KIND",  no one still said anything direct.

"youre a racist if you dont vote for obama".................wait? remember "putting words" on other peoples mouth from your previous post? contradictions are fun, arent they?........never realized the trailer trash party was that desperate."
yeah, youre right. too bad a better example of your "kind" was posted on that video posted above. And then you post a video of people saying they are not going to vote for Obama because he is black. Yea, I don't even know what you are trying to pull.

Bottom line: Grow up or get out. Want to talk about why you hate McCain so much? Carbon emissions? Taxes? Education? Want to really talk about the problems in this country or are these things over your head?"
Why don't you talk about why you hate Obama so much? Try doing it without listing the talking points Fox News lays out for you ever 15 minutes. Calling him a "Socialist" is an instant-lose. Actually explain his stances and refute them.

Yeah, I totally see that happening here."

First off, he has no stance.
Ok, fine here it goes.

1 Education: Our country is ranked 25 in the world as far as education standards go. What is Obama going to do about this? Nothing. Well, he does want to cut Nasa funding and pay teachers more. Great, another candidate that wants to pull the cover over the voters eyes by telling them that more funding = better education.

2. His foreign policy is flat out weak; has him in their pocket and I see no end to the "We need to be the police force of the world" attitude this country has. And he wants to increase funding for on top of this? Are you kidding me? Have you guys seen the debt, up and up and up it goes and here comes Obama wanting to increase government spending. He's just going to follow in the path of Bush and enlarge this government. That is not want we need now. And people think taxing the rich is going to help? We wouldn’t have to raise the taxes so much if the government just cut back on spending, something that is not going to happen under Obama.

I could keep going with why is cap and trade program is going to fail, his lack of any plan to deal with high oil prices is pathetic or why subsidizing Health Care will destroy this country even more. But do I really need to?


Edit: I'm not going to sit here and tell you guys that McCain is going to be this great leader who is going to save the country; he's probablynot going to be. But the fact is Obama will be a disaster and is under no circumstance ready to lead this nation.

"

you wanna play kid?





McCain has bucked the party line often enough to be able to lay claim to the "maverick" moniker, even if his overall record is more complex:


• In 2001, he was one of only two Republicans to vote against Bush's signature tax-relief program. The other was then-Sen. Lincoln Chafee, R-R.I., one of the Senate's most unabashedly liberal GOP members. But today, McCain supports making the tax cuts permanent because letting them lapse is tantamount to a tax increase.


• He is eager to work with Capitol Hill Democrats on topics such as immigration and climate change but has a history of clashing heatedly with Senate colleagues in both parties.


• He delivered in February 2000 a blistering critique of religious conservative leadership, which included blasting Jerry Falwell and Pat Robertson as "agents of intolerance." Yet in 2006, he delivered the commencement address at Falwell's Liberty University.

So is McCain truly a "maverick"?

"It's part of who he is, but that's not him in his entirety," said Dan Schnur, who was communications director for McCain's 2000 presidential campaign but is not affiliated with his current bid. "There are some parts of him that are very conventional, conservative Republican. And there are other parts of him that are much more independent and iconoclastic."

McCain recently quipped that he prefers the term "Great American" to the overworn "maverick" label. But he also signaled that he does not intend to run as a typical partisan in the Nov. 4 general election.

"When you look at my great hero, (progressive GOP President) Theodore Roosevelt, I think many viewed him in those days as not a stereotype Republican," McCain said. "So I don't know if you would call it a 'maverick,' but I certainly have issues that I think can attract independents. I think we can find the old Reagan Democrats and a lot of new Reagan Democrats so that we can unite the party and reach out and win an election in November."

Asked to elaborate on that strategy, McCain said: "I think my positions on the issues are very well-known, and some of them, obviously, are not always in keeping with some members of my party, such as earmarking and pork-barrel spending."

McCain has long fought the congressional practice of funneling money toward parochial projects in the home states or districts of influential lawmakers, saying it leads to waste and corruption. The stand often has found him at odds with GOP colleagues.

Matt Welch is the editor in chief of the libertarian magazine Reason and the author of a critical look at the senator from Arizona titled McCain: The Myth of a Maverick. The 2007 book's title notwithstanding, Welch acknowledged that McCain, who spent more than five years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam, has demonstrated "maverick-y" behavior ever since he was "the class pop-off" and "a funny kind of punk kid who was getting in fights."

McCain's military background has a lot to do with his political independence. Unlike many Republican leaders and activists, McCain did not rise from the conservative movement. In fact, many of the patriotic values that McCain commonly espouses from the campaign stump are nonpartisan, such as duty, honor, courage and service.

"In one sense there's a sense of structural 'maverick-ness' in general with any politician who comes after a career in the military," Welch said, citing Sen. Jim Webb, D-Va., as another example. "They tend to have a country-first, political-party-second type of approach. They're going to sound a little different from your average politician and maybe say things that sort of outrage their own party more because they're less grounded in philosophy."

McCain and Udall

Not long after his first election to Congress in 1982, McCain's independent streak quickly emerged in his choice of mentors. McCain has said it was the late Rep. Morris Udall, D-Ariz., who taught him about the necessity of forging bipartisan coalitions to pass significant legislation.

McCain took Udall's advice to heart, and it later crystallized with his successful push with Sen. Russell Feingold, D-Wis., for a new campaign-finance-reform law.

"He had no trouble trying to work on a bipartisan basis," said former Sen. Dennis DeConcini, D-Ariz., who served in the Senate with McCain from 1987 to 1995 and is now a lobbyist.

DeConcinirecalls McCain going out of his way to befriend Udall and, early on, accompanying him at times when senior Arizona delegation members would huddle to discuss issues important to the state.

"Often, I remember having those meetings and McCain would show up and kind of just be a 'yes person' for Udall," he said. "Which is fine. He learned something, and I had no objection to it."

Scott Celley, a press aide to McCain from 1987 until 1994, said McCain's maverick side was apparent from his earliest days in Congress.

Many recall McCain's 1983 House vote against extending President Reagan's Marine deployment in Lebanon. McCain cited a lack of "obtainable objectives" in the mission. Soon after, 241 Marines died in a terrorist attack on their barracks.

Celley pointed to other examples, such as McCain's early criticism of wasteful Pentagon spending, which was not a top concern for many Republicans during the days of Reagan's defense buildup.

McCain's opposition to the 1988 catastrophic health-insurance law and subsequent attempt to reform it was widely reported at the time but little remembered now. McCain sensed that Arizona seniors thought the new federal program was a disaster. But when McCain brought up the problems, Senate leaders "mocked" him, Celley recalled.

"I remember overhearing him say on the floor, 'We're going to keep coming back here and revisiting this issue over and over until I have persuaded all of you guys that this is the wrong thing,' " Celley said.

Eventually, senior outrage over a surtax in the plan mounted nationwide. The Senate voted 99-0 in October 1989 to adopt a McCain reform plan before ultimately repealing the entire program a month later.

Redefining McCain

The preponderance of incidences of McCain either bucking Bush or defying Senate GOP leaders will make it hard for Democrats to recast him as a White House stooge at this late date, said James Pfiffner, a presidential scholar at George Mason University in Virginia and the author of the 2004 book The Character Factor: How We Judge America's Presidents.

The continuing distrust and hostility toward McCain from high-profile conservative commentators such as Ann Coulter only reinforces McCain's reputation as a party outsider, he said.

"A lot more people are going to listen to (national radio host) Rush Limbaugh than are going to read the DNC 'myth buster' stuff," Pfiffner said.

Besides, McCain continues to do things his own way.

Two recent examples of McCain's trademark style don't reflect shrewd political calculation.

He continued to call for victory in Iraq, even at a time when it appeared to imperil his chances to secure the GOP nomination. McCain repeatedly said he'd rather lose a political campaign than a war and still might as public skepticism about U.S. involvement in Iraq remains high.

"It helps on the character part, but it hurts on the policy part," Pfiffner said.

Likewise, there's little upside to McCain's comments downplaying his own economic expertise other than to suggest he is someone who can comfortably discuss his flaws in public - at least away from the heat of a presidential campaign. Those remarks came back to haunt him as the economy rose to prominence in this year's race.

"He actually admits error more than most," said Sen. Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., a McCain backer. "He almost prides himself in it. He can't wait to tell you about a mistake he made or when he was wrong, and that's fairly refreshing in a politician."

McCain's sincerity even wins some grudging praise from an unlikely source: Ralph Nader, the longtime consumer advocate who is running for president as an independent.

Nader likes what McCain has accomplished on campaign-finance reform and appreciates his positions on global warming, torture and Pentagon procurement practices.

"But on foreign and military policy, he's horrendous," Nader said. "I've called him the candidate of permanent war and intervention around the world."

Still, Nader believes McCain is genuine and motivated by what he thinks is right. Conservatives ought to take note of that, he said, particularly if they expect to sway McCain on other issues after he is sworn in as president.

"If they think they can change him, they're whistling Dixie."

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#10  Edited By Renegade_v2
ManMadeGod said:
yeah, youre right. too bad a better example of your "kind" was posted on that video posted above. And then you post a video of people saying they are not going to vote for Obama because he is black. Yea, I don't even know what you are trying to pull.

Bottom line: Grow up or get out. Want to talk about why you hate McCain so much? Carbon emissions? Taxes? Education? Want to really talk about the problems in this country or are these things over your head?"
aww, did the truth hurt you? did you even watch the whole video? it shows how your "kind" justifies the hate on Obama.