GameCube Game Collection

My collection of GameCube games.

List items

  • This was the last GameCube game I purchased before GameStop pulled them from my area. It had been in my backlog for quite some time and I finally purchased it when it reached a price I was willing to pay for it.

    As for the game itself, it's a rather straight-forward 3D fighting game that players similar to other games in the genre. However, this game (just like the previous ones in the series) does have a unique mechanism that differentiates itself from the rest. By having a gauge that builds or decreases during a fight (depending on actions taken) you have a certain amount of time that you can remain in beast mode, while also gaining access to extra moves. Overall, the game is quite enjoyable especially in one-on-one matches with friends.

  • This game is definitely a strange one. I guess I could classify it as an action game, with some strategy elements, but it is most certainly an experimental game. The basic flow of the game has you growing up as baby animal, eating your way through the food chain, and gaining the powers and characteristics of the creatures you have eaten. By eating different creatures in different quantities, it will cause your character to mutate in different ways, all logged by the game. In the end, your main goal is to mutate into all the creatures in the game, which is not easy, and requires a lot of planning and careful eating. All in all, the game itself isn't very difficult, and gameplay options are limited. Once you complete the game you can play again as a different animal, and certain details change in their playthroughs. Truth be told, this game ended up being one of my least favorite games on the Gamecube, because of its short length and limited replayability.

  • I remember picking up this game on clearance a few years back at Target. I primarily picked it up just to see how this particular version came out. Aside from the changes in some of the story and cut-scenes, it played fine, and that's all I cared about.

  • Quite possibly, one of my favorite games of the sixth generation of consoles. This Western-developed strategy-rpg, gives players a lot of tactical options, in addition to direct control over hitting, missing, or getting critical hits against opponents. With an interesting story, many character classes to play with, lots of special equipment and secrets, many challenging missions across the different coliseums, and four-player support (GCN/XBX only), I couldn't get enough of this game.

  • This reboot of the Prince of Persia series recast the game as a linear, 3D, action/puzzle-platformer. With excellent stage design and good environmental challenges, the platforming sections of the game were its high points. Unfortunately, the game had an underwhelming combat system, that had none of the flair or depth of the 2D originals. Still, it's a fun game to play through, especially now that one can find it for cheap.

  • While not the sequel I was expecting to Mario 64, the game was enjoyable on its own merits. With good production values and engaging gameplay, I found myself completing the game to the fullest. Although the clean-up aspects of the game were mere busy-work, the other unique challenges that were created for use with the waterpack were fun to experience. All in all, I liked the way this game turned out and I'm glad that it was so different from Mario 64. After all, if I want to play Mario 64, I can do that on the N64 or DS.

  • In the tried-and-true tradition of sequels, VJ2 is more of the same of what was found in the original. But since the original was so entertaining, that's not a bad thing.

  • The best way to describe this game, is to view it as an old-school, memorization-based, side-scrolling, beat-em-up. As for the games features, there's a lot of time-altering combat options available, lots of secrets to discover, and an incredibly unique art style. This game can be found incredibly cheap these days, so it's worth a shot.

  • Although this game has some gameplay issues, namely the exclusive on-foot missions, I was still captivated enough by the game to earn all the platinum medals, just like I had done in the previous game. The addition of the previous game as a co-op only bonus was impressive enough on its own, and gave me a new way to play and share one of my favorite games.

  • Simply put, this is the game that motivated me to wait out in the cold during a mid-November morning launch. As far as arcade-styled, 3D space shooters go, this is one of my favorites, right up there with Colony Wars. Factor-5 did a phenomenal job pushing the GCN to its limits right from the start, while delivering a game that fixed all the problems that plagued the N64 original. All in all, this game is a technical marvel, that gave gamers a teasing glimpse of what the system was capable of, that was sadly never realized by many GCN developers.

  • P.N. 03 is a 3D, arcade-styled, stage-based, third-person shooter. With a clean and polished presentation, art-style, and gameplay, this game is one of the more unique titles on the GCN. Players control the heroine, Venessa Schneider, through a multitude of stages and optional missions, defeating bossed and minions, all the while earning extra continues and money to buy new abilities, suits, and upgrades. The gameplay is well structured and memorization/pattern-based, giving it a definite old-school appeal.

  • After playing this at a friends house, and having a laugh-riot with the rag-doll physics during the multi-player matches, I had to buy this game. Although the game in itself is a standard third-person shooter, it has some unique mechanics that help to differentiate itself. One of the core concepts behind the game is the recruit mechanic, that is in effect for both single and multiplayer. In the various stages, there are freedom fighters that are awaiting your commands. When in range, a player can pull them into their ranks, and give them commands so that they may aid you in battle. It's an incredibly fun mechanic, giving the game a slight rts vibe.

  • This is a somewhat complicated game. Technically, the game is a third-person, squad-based shooter, but many of the games challenges and control troubles, make it more advantageous to go it alone during a mission. Honestly, I would have preferred if the game played more like Battlefront or Battlefield, and had a co-op mulitplayer mode. As it stands, it's an experimental game, trying to be bring rts mechanics and controls to a console at a cost to playability.

  • This is a rather banal and trite action-adventure game in the mold of the 3D Zelda games. Still, if one can find it for cheap, it's worth a playthrough.

  • This is one my favorite GCN games. Somehow, someway, Retro Studios managed to translate the exploration-based gameplay of the 2D Metroid games into 3D, without comprimise. Much like the previous games, the shooting mechanics are simply a means to an end, and not the focus of the gameplay. Too bad the next two games in the series lost sight of this.

  • This is another favorite. This game is one of the few 2D action/adventure platformers to come out in the sixth console generation, which makes it all the more special. Melding gameplay elements from the original Mega Man, X, and Battle Network Series, there's a lot of weapons, armors, upgrades, and secrets to discover, as well as some hidden nods to the older games in the franchise.

  • Twilight Princess was my breaking point for the Zelda series. Quite simply, it felt like too much of the same of what I first experienced in the OoT, and grew tired of with TWW. All of these games play nearly identical, with many of the same puzzles and mechanics. Needless to say, I didn't complete this game, as my interest and motivation cut out half-way through the adventure.

  • Honestly, the only reason I have this game is because of the preorder bonus it came with. As for the game itself, although I did beat, and I did enjoy my time with it, it was far too short for my tastes. All in all, I would have preferred more non-linearity in the main quest, and more dungeons as well.

  • Although I'm glad that I now have two copies of OoT, I had no interest to play this, or the Master Quest, version. I played OoT to death on the N64, and if I ever play it again, it'll be too soon.

  • This stage-based, multiplayer, action-puzzle game served me better than both TWW and TP. Although not as comprehensive as A Link to the Past, or the original Zelda, it cut out much of the adventure aspects in order to focus on one of the Zelda franchises strengths - the puzzles. Ranging from environmental and navigational puzzles, sneaking past guards, and timed/skill challenges, there's a lot of variety to the gameplay. However, the game itself is very short and easy, especially if you are playing multiplayer, as it only has around two dozen stages. There isn't much in the way of replayability, unless players want to break high scores, or gather additional lives. All in all, I did enjoy this game, as it blended the gameplay components of ALttP and Link's Awakening, and merged it with an old-school presentation.

  • This Zelda-inspired, action-adventure game was an excellent, albeit short and easy, experience. With a clean and simple combat system, photography elements, stealth puzzles, character and transport upgrades, and an interesting story with interesting characters, BG&E is one of the better games of the sixth generation.

  • After years of waiting, the next console Mario Kart emerged, and it was a mixed bag. To give a frame of reference, Mario Kart 64 is my favorite in the series. It was simple and to the point, it had an amazing multiplayer mode, and incredibly addictive gameplay. As for Double Dash, I never returned to it after completing it. Why? One, I don't like that cpu opponents can use homing weapons. Two, the two characters on one cart bog down the gameplay in co-op modes. Three, the multiplayer arenas lack creativity. Four, the grand prix mode is still too easy in spite of the cpu's firepower. So, while the game did have a nice presentation, good track design, and smooth controls, it just didn't give me much of what I wanted from a Mario Kart game.

  • If you enjoy games that demand the utmost from a you, and you believe in perfectionist gameplay, than perhaps you will enjoy this game. I, on the other hand, no longer have the time, patience, interest, or motivation to do so. Although I completed some of the game's hard challenges, everything was overly difficult, just for the sake of being difficult. After a while, the game just started to annoy me with its design, and I wanted nothing more to do with it. It's a shame too, because the game itself is well crafted, with clean visuals and excellent controls. Too bad your opponents move twice as fast as you on harder levels, and track memorization is nearly useless, unless you resort to snaking (a cheat) to speed your ship beyond normal parameters.

  • Although I played this game for a solid month, trying to acquire the game's content, I eventually grew tired of it, and haven't touched it since March of 2002. In regards of the single player mode, there isn't anything there for me to return to. As for the multiplayer mode, no one in my gaming group enjoyed it, which meant that the game's main mode of replayability was cut off. In all reality, it was the game's extremely polished presentation that kept me returning, as well as all the old-school content, that kept my interest alive. But once I had seen all the game had to offer, I quitely shelved it, and moved on.

  • Soul Calibur II marked my third excursion with the Soul franchise. Having completed both Soul Edge/Blade and Soul Calibur to completion, it was only natural that I would do so again, as the game offered a combination of content found in both of those game. As such, I had to once again endure stipulation and endurance matches, in my search of the game's hidden content. Although I was victorious, I was seriously fatigued. So much so, that this would be the last Soul Calibur game I would play, as the series has failed to evolve or grow past this point. While Soul Edge/Blade and Soul Calibur were different in their combat mechanics, and Soul Calibur II added back in the weapon system from Soul Edge, SCIII and IV have since remained the same, resorting to the same gimmicks and trappings of its predecessors. I guess I just don't want to do endure the same thing again for a fourth and fifth time.

  • Although some gamers view this as an inferior version, I have to disagree. Having played both the GCN and PS2 versions to completion, both games achieve the same goal, albeit with different control schemes. In the PS2 version, where players have access to a larger and more responsive d-pad, moves are easier to perform. In the GCN version, special moves can be mapped to the c-stick to make up for the smaller d-pad. Additionally, both games allow for analog control. The overall content for the games is the same, with the GCN and XBX versions having some extra audio content not found in the PS2 version. As an added bonus, because the GCN version is viewed in such a negative light, it is relatively cheap. As far as 2D fighting games go, this is one of the best, regardless of where you play it.

  • Ikaruga is both an incredibly simple and deep vertical shoot-em-up. By changing your ship's color between black or white, you gain the ability to absorb shots of the same color, and do double the damage to enemies of the opposite. However, if you get hit by a bullet of the opposite color you currently show, you'll be destroyed. As for the scoring mechanics, everytime you destroy three enemies of the same color in a row, your score modifier will rise. If at any time you break the chain, the modifier is reset. Needless to say, the game requires a ton of memorization to get the high scores. At this point, the price of the GCN version makes it hard to acquire, so if you have a 360, go for that version. It's too unique of a game to pass up.

  • This is a typical bullet hell shooter, played on a vertical plane, that allows players to flip between two worlds of play to counter enemy attacks. All in all, this is an incredibly simple and short game, as it is mostly a boss rush mode. Your mileage with this game will most certainly vary depending on how much you enjoy the game. As for myself, I only played it a few times, as it didn't pull me in the way Ikaruga or Gradius V did.

  • This compilation of arcade games from yesteryear is packed full of memories. As for the tech behind the game, the quick load times and reduced glitching of the GCN version makes it the best choice across the three versions available.

  • Bought on a whim when I found it in a clearance bin, I know have access (once again) to some of my least favorite Mega Man games. Actually, I really only bought it to play through X2 again, and to a marvel at the inadequate version of X3 included in the compilation. All I can say, is that I'm glad I still have the SNES version of X3, because it looks and plays better than the PS1 version that is on here. Other than that, the rest of the games on the collection look and play fine.

  • I bought this game based off of the recommendations of others, and I'm glad I did. Although the combat system is the typical turn-based affair, it has its own interesting quirks and nuances that makes it unique. With an interesting customization system for weapons and spells, a large world to explore in a customizable airship, and airship battles in addition to the standard character-based ssytem. Also, the GCN version has additional content and scenarios not found in the Dreamcast original.

  • As one of the premium action-rpgs on the GCN, Tales of Symphonia became the best selling Tales game in the West. It simply came at the right moment in the GCN's life, where its owners were starving for a quality rpg, and ToS delivered.

  • Quite simply, this is one my favorite games on the GCN, as well as one of my all-time favorites. In this game, you get to create a character from different race, gender, and class combinations, give them a unique look, and send them off on quests. Whether you play single or multiplayer, your main goal is to power-up your character by finding rare and powerful gear, across four different difficulty settings and two different campaigns. This is one of those games, that if you get into it, you can easily sink a thousand hours into it.

  • This turn-based rpg set in the Mega Man X universe introduces some special elements to keep players active during battles. In it, players have a far more active role in what is happening other than simply selecting commands and letting the game take over. To start, each character has an activity gauge which depletes depending upon what actions they perform during there turn. Some attacks are launched immediately at the press of a button, while others require additional button or directional inputs to power them up. Players can also choose not to attack, to either regenerate or increase their energy stocks to perform more or stronger attacks on the their next turn. In short, the battle system is a lot of fun and it has a great deal of strategy (especially in regards to the healing system).

  • This turn-based rpg is a simple, by-the-numbers, dungeon-crawler. It's fine if you can find it for cheap, otherwise it's best to focus on some of the better GCN rpgs.

  • Baten Kaitos Origins is a card-based, turn-based rpg. Either through adventuring or through battle, players acquire cards that they can use in battle to create combos, access buffs, heal party members, or equip special weapons and armor.

  • Metroid Prime 2 stands as one of the very few games I've sold and later repurchased. I was burnt out on the whole franchise by the time Echoes was released and I no longer had the patience to explore every inch of the game. But, I recently realized that my decision to drop the game was a hasty one. I wasn't in the mood to play it at the time and I made a mistake. Also, now that the future of the series is unknown, it was wise to get a hold of this game again.

  • This is another game that I sold and later repurchased. The main reason I picked this game up again was to see if I played it wrong the first time. The game has a very unusual stat system that never seemed to work the way it was intended. So, I'm going to try this game again while ignoring many of the stat upgrades to see if they make a difference or not.

  • This is the final game I purchased for the GameCube. During the last few months of 2012, I decided to do one last sweep through the system's library and grab a few more games to finalize my personal collection. That said, I bought this game (along with Echoes and Crystal Chronicles) to give it a second chance. I really didn't care for it the first time I played it back in 2005 thanks to the on-foot missions. But, now that this series is in limbo, I decided to pick it up to try it again. Also, it was a good idea to grab Assault just in case we don't see a new game in the future.