Nintendo DS Game Collection

My collection of Nintendo DS Games.

List items

  • A simple and grind-heavy action-rpg.

  • I enjoyed this game so much, that I contributed a review for it here on Giant Bomb.

  • This is the game that sold me on the DS. Although I didn't find it as memorable or as enjoyable as Aria of Sorrow, I still kept at it, in part to its amazing soundtrack.

  • Quite possibly the easiest Mario Kart game. The cpu has a habit of using a particular power-up that hampers the other cars, slowing them down, while its effect on human players is negligible.

  • An excellent port of the N64 classic. The d-pad controls work surprisingly well, and the expanded content completes and already superb package.

  • A port of the modern PC classic, the DS version captures much of its spirit, minus the online level sharing. (The service has been discontinued on the DS.)

  • I found this sequel to Mega Man ZX to be far more enjoyable. It doesn't have the same problems with the boss encounters that plagued the original, making the sequel a more fluid experience.

  • There really isn't much for me to say about this game, except that I really like the Mega Man games. This game is simply the next in line to build upon the foundation laid by Mega Man, Mega Man X, and Mega Man Zero. Additionally, this game has a really good soundtrack.

  • This game offers more simple and light-hearted enjoyment that Kirby games are known for. The treasure and upgrade system is a nice extra.

  • My feelings towards this game are mixed. On one hand, I like the games that are on here, as they are simple and enjoyable. On the other hand, the games do not accurately represent what retro games were actually like, especially in terms of difficulty. That said, this collection is worth buying for Gaudia Quest alone, which is a spoof on Dragon Quest.

  • All I can say is that I bought this collection just to play the original arcade versions of Contra and Gradius.

  • I picked this game up on a whim because it was free. It has its moments, but there is far too much randomization and abuse from the cpu. Granted, the DS version allows for the player to grind as much as they like, to help mitigate the gameplay inconsistencies, but sometimes it's just not enough.

  • I bought this game back when it launched. It came at a time when the DS was starving for software, as were its owners. I enjoyed my time with this navigational puzzle game while it lasted, as it didn't have many puzzles to play through.

  • This is one of my favorite games, period. After playing Mario Picross all those years ago, I yearned for another one to be localized. And when Picross DS finally came out, I bought it without hesistation.

  • The first game I bought for the DS back in November of 2004. It's a slick action-puzzle game, that not too many people know about. There are still some websites that don't acknowledge its existence.

  • I picked this up on a whim as it was only $10. Let me just say that I didn't regret it. This little game gave me more enjoyment than some games five times its cost.

  • This is another game I picked up for $10. Once again, I got more than my money's worth, but it was a bit on the easy side.

  • I bought this so I could play the NES versions of Contra and Super C on the go.

  • This is a superb action-puzzle shooter. You are free to do what ever you want, in any order that you want, in addition to making shareable levels. This game is as much of a gem as its N64 and Dreamcast predecessors.

  • I don't like this game too much. The stylus-only controls and interactive battle segments drag down the battle system. The only reason I hold onto it is because the game is simple enough, and I might return to it to complete it one day.

  • This is just more of the same that was seen in the original. The battle system isn't any more complex or difficult.

  • This is an incredibly simple srpg with an attractive art style. There really isn't that much in the way of strategy for this game, outside of unit position, because it is far too easy to level up and dominate the battle field.

  • I was so heart broken over this game, that I contributed a review for it here on Giant Bomb.

  • More of the same of what was found in the original, but now you can control two characters in the dungeons.

  • This is a really simple and easy rogue-like.

  • This is highly customizable srpg fixes some of the problems of the original, but borrows far too much of its assets. Still, it is a remarkably enjoyable game as well as a solid srpg.

  • This is a simple and easy action-rpg, that also has an a separate multiplayer component. In both game modes, the player goes from area to area in search of items and equipment to strengthen there character as they make their way through the game. However, only in the multiplayer mode can you create a unique character.

  • This sequel to Ring of Fates makes many changes and refinements to the original design. The biggest change comes from the merging of the single and multiplayer components that allows you to play with your created characters in both modes. Additionally, a large amount of smaller changes have been made. Magic spells now require mp, equipment now have slots to add ability gems to, stat potions can only be found in the dungeons, and only respawn during a game plus. Overall, this is a far more complete game than the original.

  • This is a 3D remake of the SNES original. Certain tweaks have been made to the game to make it harder for veterans, and new options have been added to make the character more customizable. The music is still fantastic.

  • This is a 3D remake of the NES original. This game was an instant purchase for me, simply because this is the first time it has been made available to the US audience. However, even though this is a remake, it plays very much like a NES game.

  • This is an expansion of everything that was found in the original.

  • This is a difficult and classicly styled first-person turn-based rpg. Players must create a guild and party members that best suit their play style, and work there way through a series of dungeons. Players must map their progress, take on quests from the town, avoid traps and dangerous monsters, and prepare themselves every step of the way.

  • This is an action-rpg played from an ismoetric perspective. In my opinion, this is the better of the two Ancient Art games that were released. Whereas the PSP version was an empty, aimless, and meaningless grinder, the DS version played similarly to Diablo, and had more structure to the entirety of its gameplay. The DS version had a very focused main quest, instead of the poorly constructed PSP version. Additionally, character improvements were much more important and noticeable in the DS version, where in the PSP version you would be constantly overwhelmed by its horribly unbalanced gameplay.

  • This was a must buy for me. For the first time, this game was made available to US gamers, and I would have been a fool to pass it up. Sure, it's just more Dragon Quest, but when it is something you like, that's not even a concern.

  • This was an exceptional treat for me. Back when the original Dragon Warrior came out in the US, me and my brother played it to completion. However, we never got the opportunity to play II-IV. Years later, Dragon Warrior I-III were remade for the Game Boy Color, but I wasn't too eager to play those remakes, while my brother was. To tell you the truth, I didn't like the presentation in those games. The battle system, which was played out against a plain white background was simply unappealing to me. And then when I discovered that the NES versions were no different, I was somewhat disappointed. However, with the release of the DS version, that emptiness has been alleviated. The battle system has a complete presentation, that helps to keep things visually engaging. I just wish that Enix would redo II-III in the same fashion so that I can play those as well.

  • I'm so glad that I now have this game in my own collection. You see, when I was younger, my brother and I shared a SNES collection. We pooled them together and shared them, and everything was fine. As we got older, we started to sell these games, and since Chrono Trigger was his, he was free to do what he wanted with it. I figured that since we both played it to death, we didn't nee it anymore. However, that was not the case. Years passed, and it became one of the last gaping holes in my library, long after the likes of Final Fantasy IV, V, and VI had been filled. But then Square threw me a bone for the DS, and I was more than happy to take it.

  • This is another simple and straight-forward action-rpg. It is very easy and linear, and presents an endearing art style and an exceptional soundtrack.

  • I consider this to be the second weakest game in the Castlevania rpg series, with Harmony of Dissonance being the worst. The character swap mechanics were entirely cumbersome and unnecessary, and the game was far too easy. At least the soundtrack was exceptional.

  • This is a difficult and ruthless classicly styled first person turn-based rpg. Borrowing heavily from Wizardry, this game presents an undeniably enjoyable old-school challenge and experience.

  • This turn-based rpg borrows heavily from Chrono Trigger.