Something went wrong. Try again later

Undeadpool

New Mystery Science Theater 3000 is faaaaaaaaaaaaaanTASTIC.

8412 10761 111 305
Forum Posts Wiki Points Following Followers

Undeadpool's forum posts

Avatar image for undeadpool
Undeadpool

8412

Forum Posts

10761

Wiki Points

305

Followers

Reviews: 20

User Lists: 18

Oh my knees and hip flexors!

This lined up perfectly with me moving to a new apartment and picking up this game cause I knew I'd be able to play it, regardless of internet connection. The internet turned out to be fine, which was good because I could see this series debut and play along. Or get way ahead to avoid spoilers since the initial episodes were ~15 minutes long.

Vinny's "we'll just do 15-20 minute episodes" quote lives up there alongside Dan and Jeff swearing, "There's no way you introduce the brother of the main character and then kill just him 3 episodes later. We DEFINITELY haven't seen the last of Raditz."

Avatar image for undeadpool
Undeadpool

8412

Forum Posts

10761

Wiki Points

305

Followers

Reviews: 20

User Lists: 18

The issue with Superman 64 (not even the game's actual title) is that it remained a punching bag for people who already hated how prominent and "boring" Superman was. Add onto that the changes that Warner was apparently weirdly insistent on (the gamedevs had to PROVE that Superman could swim in the comics before they'd let him do it in the game, he wasn't allowed to cause property damage, he wasn't allowed to do real harm, and of course "kryptonite fog") so it became easy, low-effort fodder especially for the ultra-edgy writers on the early internet.

The other side of the coin is Batman & Robin: a movie that was savaged for the crime of doing exactly what the studio asked of it and daring to not take seriously a billionaire in tights fighting street crime with a pair of sidekicks.

You can trace the 'grimdark bullshit' we're dealing with in movies to the perception of these two properties, especially on the early internet where hating on something counted as criticism and the likes of Harry Knowles were becoming prominent by shitting on things rather than actually critiquing them.

I'm also one of those people who think early-3D was a massive mistake, but that's another talk for another time.

Avatar image for undeadpool
Undeadpool

8412

Forum Posts

10761

Wiki Points

305

Followers

Reviews: 20

User Lists: 18

Of course they don't care, literally who's going to make them?

Companies can take PR hits and pretend it's "punishment," (and their weird online sycophants CERTAINLY will) but unless someone makes them financially care, they will not.

Avatar image for undeadpool
Undeadpool

8412

Forum Posts

10761

Wiki Points

305

Followers

Reviews: 20

User Lists: 18

Avatar image for undeadpool
Undeadpool

8412

Forum Posts

10761

Wiki Points

305

Followers

Reviews: 20

User Lists: 18

At this point I'm just downloading videos to an external harddrive, I have zero faith that "Fandom" is going to even keep videos archived or hosted on the site from day-to-day.

Avatar image for undeadpool
Undeadpool

8412

Forum Posts

10761

Wiki Points

305

Followers

Reviews: 20

User Lists: 18

"All the Stars and Teeth" by Adalyn Grace is such a breath of fresh air in the fantasy space.

It's about pirates and the high seas and a fleshmancer princess, and my GOD, it's so refreshing to read a fantasy book that takes place under the sun and sky.

For a less recent, but no less refreshing, example: "The Door Into Fire" by Diane Duane, written in the '70s and yet feels incredibly modern and revolutionary because it was subverting what could be done with fantasy well before it was fashionable. It's the story of the only male mage in the land and his love triangle with a prince and a fire elemental.

Avatar image for undeadpool
Undeadpool

8412

Forum Posts

10761

Wiki Points

305

Followers

Reviews: 20

User Lists: 18

It's important to remember, as well: as you get older, you start to be able to "see the strings" of videogames a bit more, and it simply becomes harder and harder to get that old feeling back. Hence why so many people descend into nostalgia wankery and pining for when "games used to be better" when what they actually want is to feel the same way about them as they used to. And it's not a bad thing: it means you're still growing and expanding your mind and seeking novelty, which becomes harder and harder to find as you realize how similar a lot of experiences in the gaming space are.

And it's why some of the best experiences are in that later time: you get to have something like Baldur's Gate 3 actually BE Baldur's Gate THE THIRD. You get the part in Spider-Man 2 where you play as Venom that feels like a love letter to every kid who grew up thinking he was cool and having NO videogame that made you feel that way. You get games that take advantage of the fact that there's a whole decades-long history of "gaming" to pull from both to subvert and try new things. But unfortunately: the industry isn't set up for those games to be anything close to "the norm."

And sometimes you just need comfort: I've played the first half of Earthbound more times than I can count (and the second half about half as much as that because while it's a perfect game with no flaws, there are parts that drag).

Avatar image for undeadpool
Undeadpool

8412

Forum Posts

10761

Wiki Points

305

Followers

Reviews: 20

User Lists: 18

The "Cook, Serve, Delicious!" series is something I find myself going back to when I get into one of these funks. There's something incredibly cathartic about the flow of the games, especially as you get to the midpoint, and ESPECIALLY if you use a keyboard (at least for me) that still feels satisfying without demanding a lot of my creative mind. It could just be a part of your brain that's exhausted and needs a break, it could be the season (assuming you're not in the Southern Hemisphere, it's a pretty brutal winter at the moment). The other option I usually go with is something intentionally stressful: Darkest Dungeon 1 or 2 or Fear & Hunger if you're not averse to some truly dark weirdness, because managing stress and bars in a game can often fill in the feeling of managing it IRL.

Apart from that, and if fully taking a break from the medium doesn't sound like a good idea, I'd say go outside your comfort zone. Try a sports game or a fighting game, try a deckbuilder or a roguelike or a racing game, something completely outside your wheelhouse. Honestly, if none of that sounds good, try reading a book or watching some movies, I've found that my brain just sometimes needs a break from videogames (though I almost always come back to cozy sims, and I gotta say: "Unpacking" is a great quick fix of that, but something like Spiritfarer or Coral Island could scratch the itch in a more long-term sense.

Avatar image for undeadpool
Undeadpool

8412

Forum Posts

10761

Wiki Points

305

Followers

Reviews: 20

User Lists: 18

@efesell said:

In my experience most fanmade 'fixes' of narratives involve petty personal grievances with a story more than an understanding of what does or does not work in the narrative, so I don't tend to think very highly of them in general.

Based on my observations, many fan-created "fixes" for narratives often stem from personal frustrations with a story rather than a genuine grasp of narrative dynamics. As a result, I generally hold a skeptical view towards such attempts, as they often prioritize individual preferences over a nuanced understanding of what truly enhances or detracts from a narrative.

Yeah, fan "interpretations" tend to just take whatever personal ax the fan has to grind and just shoves it entirely into the spotlight. Looking at you, Mass Effect Indoctrination Theory. The fact that this was held up as "legitimately better" and "totally plausible" speaks to the lack of critical thought or any kind of that usually goes into these. The issue is generally: they remove all context and just force through their own "better" interpretations.

To be clear: being pissed about an ending and writing your own is completely fine, it's when the author makes a push that their version is "better" or "fixes everything" that I start to roll my eyes. I think fanfiction is at its best when it focuses on expanding the canon rather than contracting or "solving" it because, as the above comments mention: people who think they "know better" often just "feel differently" and that comes through in the way their "fix" is entirely dependent on ignoring massive swaths that contradict it.

Frankly it's one reason I think the Star Wars saga is in such shambles: catering to a fandom that doesn't want expansion, only contraction.