I GOT AN INTERNSHIP

Well, that blog post I made back in November finally paid off.

I was interviewing with Abercrombie & Fitch at the time (which did not go well), and landed a position with Aeropostale (hilariously, one of A&F's biggest competitors) two days ago! I'm going to be a Color and Concept design intern, which means conceptualizing collections and checking out trends in fabric and color and whatever else they happen to need me for.

Plus, it pays REALLY well. No complaints here at all. See y'all in New York this summer. B]

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Interview Tips?

Surprise, I'm a junior in college and I'm staring straight down the barrel of a gun called 'required summer internships'. Usually this would be more of a ready concern in spring, but this is a special case.

While I'm perfectly aware that the hiring process as a whole in America has been changing rapidly for years and that my area of study isn't exactly the most mainstream thing for this website, I figure any advice is worth hearing. I mean, I assume that a good chunk of duders have jobs. That's more than I have, and I'm willing to admit it!

I have an interview for a fashion design internship at a very large company with a young consumer demographic on November 11th. It's paid (very well), has provided housing, access to a private campus gym, massive discounts at retailers, and priority hiring after graduation -- that's the big one! I feel good about my resume and portfolio (and there's not too much I could do to either than I'm not already aware of right now), so all that's left is making a good impression with the scouts that I meet!

I've heard I need a good handshake and that I should demonstrate that I'm knowledgable about the brand, and ask questions when I can. Any other general pointers come to mind?

I turn to you, community. Pump up my interview game. I don't want to be jobless after I graduate. Not with all these loans.

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When it's time to fashion we will fashion hard

I'm just giving this space some positivity, for my own sake. I just went through a maaaassively difficult five days of preparation for a resort wear critique at school. Managed to draw and color ten men's and women's wear sketches, render 19 fashion flats in illustrator, and finally nail down the name and tone of my concept.

My critique went really well, and the industry critic had lots of nice things to say! I'm only making three pieces and two outfits for the May fashion show, and I feel really good about it. Plus, now I have a ton of new material for my portfolio. I have an interview for an internship I really want in less than two weeks, so I want to be prepared!

Anyway, here are the designs I'll be sewing. Here's hoping that the school mannequins won't make the romper so big that I won't be able to keep it and wear it afterwards. B]

I'm still better at drawing women than men, unsurprisingly. With any luck, though, I'll literally never design men's wear again. It's so boring, who even cares.
I'm still better at drawing women than men, unsurprisingly. With any luck, though, I'll literally never design men's wear again. It's so boring, who even cares.

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Part-Time Actual Skullgirls Expert

I guess this is what months of looking through model sheets and wikipages for references has gotten me. Figured I might as well add to a few of the character pages, since Skullgirls is really the most 'current' thing that I have any particular depth of knowledge regarding.

Not that it's a bad thing. Skullgirls will always be my jam.

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(Fun fact: Parasoul and I share waist and hip measurements. You learn something new every day.)

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