Something went wrong. Try again later
    Follow

    Street Fighter 6

    Game » consists of 2 releases. Released Jun 02, 2023

    The sixth numbered entry in Capcom's signature fighting game series introduces an aesthetic refresh, a new "Drive System" for advanced techniques, a revamped online lobby system, and a new single-player campaign with a heavily-customizable fighter.

    Learning to "learn"...kinda sucks

    Avatar image for narficacid
    narficacid

    148

    Forum Posts

    119

    Wiki Points

    0

    Followers

    Reviews: 0

    User Lists: 1

    Edited By narficacid

    TL:DR - "What are you frustrated you're not better at?"

    I'm a Mental Health Counselor. Licensed and everything. It's been a dream of mine since my early adolescence. I'm good at the job. I started my private practice 3 years ago, and was immediately full for clients, and I now have a manageable caseload of people who like talking to me and who I help with their emotions and trauma in a way that they say they greatly appreciate. That said, I've always been "good" at this since I can remember. I was born into a male body, and even being cis-gendered and heterosexual, I've always been comfortable expressing my emotions and helping others do that in a safe environment.

    This is to introduce how much I dislike saying this: I had an emotional and existential breakdown over how shitty I felt and how "stupid" I was when my friend just utterly destroyed me in a set of matches in Street Fighter 6.

    Some backstory: I've loved fighting games since I first put quarters into a Street Fighter II machine at my bowling alley arcade as a 11ish-year-old kid. I chose the cool dude with stretchy arms (while I'm now training to be a yoga teacher, Dhalsim was not to be my main though) and was immediately in love with the spectacle, bombast, and dopamine surge of this "new" type of game. Then 2011 arrived. After YEARS of playing 99.9% of my time with fighting games single player (with some exception of ruling my local arcades with Wolverine in X-Men: Children of the Atom and Marvel vs. Capcom 1); after multiple decades of playing this way, falling in LOVE with Guilty Gear XX # Reload, and the death of arcades, I decided that with Street Fighter IV...I would start playing online.

    Sub backstory: I've also had a STRONG social phobia most of my life (when I'm not interacting with others professionally, at least) combined with some INTENSE competitiveness.

    I still went into USFIV's online lobby with high hopes.

    "I've been doing this for 20 years," I said.

    "At the very least, I'm probably going to be decent with Guile. I've been practicing combo trials with him forever so I can do some cool shit," I continued.

    36 hours later...my partner DEMANDED that I stop playing online because I was "becoming a terrible person to be around." She was right. Even when I was winning I was just FRUSTRATED as hell. People were constantly just countering my jump-ins (my worst habit and hardest to deal with) and even when I was scrubbing out some wins, they felt hollow because it just felt like the other person was "letting me win" or I had just been the person to NOT make the last mistake.

    After 20 matches (if that) I decided I was, after all, terrible at fighting games...or at least playing other humans.

    Back to single player I went. "Here at least I can beat the shit out of AIs."

    Backstories over. To the co-Main Event!: 6-7ish years later, in my first job at a community mental health center I met my first adult, video-game-loving friend, and we would get together at their home to play random fighting games every now and then (when my competitiveness and fragile ego would allow it). Pre-pandemic time we played a slew together on their couch: Tekken 6, Dive Kick, MvC3, Capcom vs. SNK 2, Pocket Rumble (surprisingly awesome, don't let this one slip away if you've never played it), Last Blade 2, etc. all had a time between us. We were/are pretty evenly matched and, except for the time they COMPLETELY DESTROYED me in CvS2, we would pretty much 50/50 all the time.

    Very recently (within the last 4/5 months) I got the itch again. Kudos to the Guilty Gear Strive development team: they had made me want to unlock shit and had given me JUST enough currency from finishing Arcade Mode with every character to get me to say, "ok if I'm going to unlock everything, I need to at least finish the tutorials." Those tutorials are AMAZING. For the first time, I was seeing the mind-games in fighting games. For the first time, I could see the art and the mental play!

    ... ... "wait"... ..."Fuck, I think I can do this"... ... ... ....

    I went online again!... The "Floor" lobby system seems excellent in Strive and truly the best version of "skills based matchmaking," and I had started to learn to actually play decently with my lady Baiken.

    I was feeling myself improve! I was learning!! I was winning more, but it wasn't as important as analyzing my replays. Both the wins and the losses!

    I was moving up the Floors! I beat a Happy Chaos player on Floor 8!?!?!!! I have just played 100 matches!?!?!?...I've never played 100 matches in a fighting game against real-life people in any context.

    Inspired by the "Versus Wolves" podcast (shoutout to friend-of-the-site John "Super Eyepatch Wolf" Walsh), I started looking for local meet-ups. There was a Tekken meet-up nearby. There was a FGC "Casual" meet-up slightly less nearby but they played some Strive there.

    I went to Seattle Tekken. I was terrified and I only played a few matches. I nearly won a few though...in a game I didn't quite understand!

    I went to TRC Casuals. I won a FEW matches with my Baiken...I lost a LOT more, but I was getting feedback and I enjoyed it.

    "Where's your parry, dude? You've got no way to stop me just running in and punching. You've gotta use all your character's tools." - a really nice dude

    "You know why I'm getting you in that combo every time? You won't stop pressing buttons. A 5 frame Slash is going to lose every time if you're getting up from knockdown." - a wonderfully nice person who told me that AFTER they had 0-15'd me

    ...I was "capital L" Learning now! True to their reputation (despite how SOME people present online), people within the FGC locals were INCREDIBLY nice, wanted to teach, and wanted to help everyone get better.

    Then Terry got announced for Street Fighter 6. Terry "Mother Fucking Hero of Southtown" Bogard! I bought Street Fighter 6 the next week and started grinding out some play with Guile in the meantime. I was playing some single player, messing around in the beginner-only lobbies.

    Main Event storytime for real now: My friend from before (remember them) bought Street Fighter 6 when I had expressed some interest in doing those FGC meetups and had been preaching the good word of Guilty Gear Strive. We played some matches 3 weeks or so ago. They stuck with their main Chun-Li and I was all for my dude Guile. We had been trading back and forth some matches and were pretty 50/50 again. I was sorta frustrated that all my recent learning hadn't made it so I was CRUSHING them. And then the fated sentence happened: "Want to try out your Akuma?" Fuck yes I did! I've loved Akuma since Alpha 3, but I'd never played him competitively... ... ...

    My friend OWNED my Akuma. I took some fights near the end where I started to calm down and not be so "on tilt" but the series there was 2-16.

    I broke. I graciously thanked my friend, told them we would play more later, and intended to go to lunch to deal with this emotional fraughtness. It was...uncomfortable, but anything mentionable is manageable. "I have the tools to deal with this." "I'm disappointed, and it's ok to feel that way."

    Before I left for food (a necessary part of any human being's functioning)...food, by the way, I would not have the rest of the day, I wanted to briefly make some moves in some Chess games I was playing because I recently started playing on Chess.com to start to learn there as well...apparently, my capacity for pulling my ADHD addled brain into complex, strategy-based tasks knows very few bounds. That's also been a "man I would like to learn this but am too scared to play real people" thing for me for decades. All the games I played were tinged with my frustration and disappointment and each one looked like a completely hopeless game that I was inevitably going to lose (I won 2 of the 3 when they were over, btw).

    I BROKE. "I'm fucking terrible at this." "I'm not learning ANYTHING." "Nothing I want to get better at is in my ability." "I'm always going to suck at things I enjoy."

    I collapsed for the rest of the day (thankfully it wasn't a work day) in what I believe was 70% shame spiral, 20% anxiety attack, and 10% obsessive gaming to not do either of the other two things.

    Conclusion, aka why did I tell a bunch of random strangers about an emotional breakdown?: I've done some work on these emotions over the last few weeks. I turned down a rematch session with my friend, but I've played enough SF6 to get "ranked"; and while I'm upset that I sit in 2* Bronze, I'm enjoying the process again. I think I'm ready to start learning and being ok with being taught lessons. But, it's still hard.

    It SUCKS to love something and want to learn, but to sit in that awkward "Conscious Incompetence" learning phase.

    Do any of you have similar video game or life stories? Anything that you're driven towards that you stick with despite some of the more painful lessons that it gives you?

    ...I'm really excited about that Capcom collection and I'm excited to pull my Wolverine out again in MvC 1. Anybody consider themselves a "scrub"ish player who wants to learn along with me? :)

    Avatar image for barky
    barky

    29

    Forum Posts

    0

    Wiki Points

    0

    Followers

    Reviews: 0

    User Lists: 0

    Haven't posted on Giant Bomb Forums ever, but I saw this on twitter and it is thoroughly in my wheelhouse. You didn't ask for advice, but I see an old version of myself in your post, so I want to give what I hope is good advice for you. If you don't want it, ignore it.

    All disappointment comes from ego. My expectations of performance (how good I am) are not matching the objective reality of the situation. Going into a new thing, especially competitive in nature, and expecting to succeed will ruin your mental. It's a fun killer. As a mental health provider you probably already know this.

    Now, on to fighting games. Fighting games are great, but they are hard. There is an immense amount of discourse whether fighting games are 'harder' than other types of competitive games, and I believe they are for a number of reasons. You have only yourself to blame for losses, there is no one else to both rely on for wins or blame for losses. This puts the entirety of your success entirely on your shoulders. There is no 'down time' in fighting games, it is always the most intense part of other competitive games from the start of 'fight'. They are intense.

    People are good at fighting games. Really good. You put anything competitive into people's hands and they will get really good at them, fighting games are no exception. You will lose, and you lose a lot when you start, you have to accept that and be at peace with it. All that being said, what do you do?

    In order to start winning, you have to stop caring about winning. This is paradoxical and will drive you mad, but I promise it is the truth. Play ranked to improve, you will be matched with others on your skill level, casual and other modes will not do so. It may be scary to have a rank and points attached to your name (and associating your worth to those points/rank is another trap), but it is the best way to improve. You go into matches, working on one thing, focus only on that. Be it a combo, recognizing a situation, anti-airing, etc, you work on that alone. You do this slowly, and over time, you will win, you will rank up, I promise you.

    Last thing I will mention. when you are integrating something new in fighting games (or anything else really), you will do the thing 100% in training mode, then you will fail in real games, this is part of the process. It goes like this:

    1. 100% in training mode

    2. forget in real matches, realize you forgot the thing after the fact

    3. see the thing before it happens, recognize it, but fail or flub the mechanical button pushing

    4. see thing, recognize it, then mechanically succeed

    5. see thing, then do response without thinking

    Hope this helps, and I hope you enjoy FGs as I have, as a vehicle for self improvement. If you are maining guile in sf6, I'm a guile main in diamond 3 and would be happy to look at some replays and help you out if you'd wish. There are discords for every character in sf6 that are truly helpful, I am active in the Guile sf6 discord and I can say that even among the good discords, the guile one is really great. Let me know if you would like an invite.

    The FGC is truly helpful and kind as you've experienced for people who want to learn, despite the highly competitive nature of the game.

    Good luck.

    Avatar image for narficacid
    narficacid

    148

    Forum Posts

    119

    Wiki Points

    0

    Followers

    Reviews: 0

    User Lists: 1

    #2  Edited By narficacid

    @barky: Deeply thankful for your feedback, barky. You could say a request for advice was "implied" at least. I'm working through many things, but my Ego is certainly one of them. I've not been back to the meet-ups this past month because of personal stuff, but I plan to return and those are genuinely helpful for my ego (even when I get blown up by Bridget 10 times).

    I'm going to keep going, and I'll take your 5 point plan into account. Am I ever going to hit Master with Guile, Akuma, or Terry? That's less important to me than using this as a jumping off point to work on that 3 letter word we mentioned before.

    Guile is my main (and has been for 28 years or so at least), and in addition I am looking to learn Terry when he releases in the Summer. He blew my mind when CvS 1 first hit the arcade I would hide out in during college, and I've come to love KoF throughout the years just because of him.

    I'll certainly take that Discord invite. The idea of you looking over my replays fills me with dread and preemptive embarrassment, but I would love that. My username is the same on both of those platforms, so feel free to do as you please... Anyone else who's lurking as well. ;) Building a real-life community of people with whom I can share my fighting games, both online and off, was my intention all along.

    Avatar image for barky
    barky

    29

    Forum Posts

    0

    Wiki Points

    0

    Followers

    Reviews: 0

    User Lists: 0

    great, glad you found it helpful. Discord invite for the Guile Discord: https://discord.gg/kzdgnhfg. For anyone lurking, there is a full list of character discords here: https://www.reddit.com/r/StreetFighter/wiki/6/characterdiscords

    Avatar image for undeadpool
    Undeadpool

    8444

    Forum Posts

    10761

    Wiki Points

    0

    Followers

    Reviews: 20

    User Lists: 19

    #4  Edited By Undeadpool

    GAWD, this made me miss Divekick...it was the CHOSEN ONE. It was 90% headgames, a LITERAL thinking-person's fighting game! WHY OH WHY DIDN'T THE ONLINE LAST MORE THAN 2 WEEKS?!...

    ANYHOO: Another thing to point out is: the floor is SO MUCH HIGHER on fighting games than it used to be. I can still vividly remember being able to make it out of the lower ranks of games like MK9 or SFIV because I knew to block. Like, at all. I vividly remember a salty Raiden player that did nothing but spam the "Superman charge" and then sent me an angry message on Xbox Live when I very easily countered by...blocking and uppercutting.

    Nowadays, that is absolutely NOT the case, running into players that low-skill, even in early games, just doesn't seem to happen, either because most people going online have SOME familiarity with, at the very least, how fighting games work and what they are.

    I'm not sure I can EVER be as good at a game as I was at Street Fighter IV, simply because when that game came out, I lived in a house with 5 other dudes, all of us worked different schedules, and there was, I would say, a game you could jump into 18 hours out of the day. So I unintentionally got REALLY GOOD (by getting my ASS WHUPPED) before I even stepped into Ranked. I had unwittingly trained for ~500 hours before my first game and it turns out: my Abel was unstoppable at low ranks. And as barky says: that is sometimes a massive hindrance to me because I get absolutely MURDERIZED online when I first start out because I can still remember that easy climb to Silver.

    Anyway, I don't know if this has an actual point, but it was really nice to read your post, and I wanted to jump in and say: yeah, I know how you feel. It's fugging ROUGH, learning. But honestly, this has made me want to take an actual run at getting decent with Cammy...

    Avatar image for narficacid
    narficacid

    148

    Forum Posts

    119

    Wiki Points

    0

    Followers

    Reviews: 0

    User Lists: 1

    #5  Edited By narficacid

    @undeadpool: Happy to have someone who I consider GB Forum royalty be inspired by my ramblings. :)

    And if you haven't messed around in Pocket Rumble, do. It's...I would say 75% headgames. Not a match for Divekick's 90%, but somewhere close.

    Avatar image for chamurai
    chamurai

    1422

    Forum Posts

    472

    Wiki Points

    0

    Followers

    Reviews: 0

    User Lists: 0

    Good write-up! I know how you feel. I used to play SFIV and MvC3 with a friend who was pretty decent at fighting games and would get destroyed all the time. Now, I would play fighting games solo and feel pretty good about myself but the second my opponent became a person with a brain I was completely lost. I would endure the punishment for about 20 matches, get visibly frustrated and ask to change games. Every once in a while I would hit some groove and peace of mind where I'd be actually going toe-to-toe with him and he knew me so well that all he had to do was say something like "You're doing good today." and it'd break my concentration and I'd be back to my normal losing self.

    I have since accepted that I'm just not good at competetive gaming. Still hasn't stopped me from buying SF6 last year.

    Avatar image for narficacid
    narficacid

    148

    Forum Posts

    119

    Wiki Points

    0

    Followers

    Reviews: 0

    User Lists: 1

    @chamurai: Thanks! If you ever want to dip your toes in, you'll always have a friend in me who can help impart lessons. :)

    Avatar image for ben_h
    Ben_H

    4890

    Forum Posts

    1628

    Wiki Points

    0

    Followers

    Reviews: 1

    User Lists: 5

    #8  Edited By Ben_H

    This is me with Starcraft 2. I've played it on and off since release in 2010. The pattern that happens is: "I should play SC2 again!" -> "SC2's so fun, I should play it more often" -> play competitive ladder for a few weeks/months, rebuild my skill set and catch up on the meta -> hit my previous skill ceiling -> start having to play more than I'd like if I want to improve more -> play more for a few months, see MMR increase -> plateau with my improvement level, have to play a bunch just to maintain my level -> start to feel burnt out on the game -> quit playing after I realize I end up in a bad mood when I play the game more often than not. This pattern has happened to me a dozen times now. By the time I quit I can see the mistakes I'm making and can see why I'm losing or I'm hitting people that just grind out more games than me and have better mechanics as a result.

    It's all well and good until I have to properly dig in and figure out why I'm losing then I start tearing myself apart over the obvious mistakes. I never give myself credit for any improvements and instead only focus on the things I did badly. For example, I hit the highest MMR level (the border of Diamond 1 and Master 3, a level in which would mean that I'd be favoured to win against something like 90%+ of the player base) I've ever been at in my most recent run at the game but I was never happy with how I played, even when I won. After I ended an SC2 session recently in a particularly nasty mood, I decided it was time for another break so that's where I'm at now.

    But seriously, the conscious incompetence phase is a real thing and sucks so much to be in. I have a degree in math, and upper year math is crammed full of people who constantly live in that phase since it's such an abstract field that never lets you be comfortable with things and where learning the more complex topics requires a fair amount of slamming your head against them until you have a breakthrough and understand them. One of my profs saw this and always made a point to give us pep talks since he understood what we were going through. Before final exams (I took multiple classes from him because he ruled), he would take time to remind us that just by virtue of being in these exams, we were incredibly smart and hardworking people since just getting to the point of being able to register for those classes was pretty tough and required going through multiple layers of classes designed to weed out people who couldn't cut it. Of course at the time I thought that didn't help me since I thought I was awful at math (I still think that), but in the years since I've thought a lot about what he said and have understood the point he wanted to make.

    Avatar image for undeadpool
    Undeadpool

    8444

    Forum Posts

    10761

    Wiki Points

    0

    Followers

    Reviews: 20

    User Lists: 19

    @narficacid: Flatterer! I'm just happy to be well-remembered!

    And I'll give that a look for sure, I also briefly got into SamSho because that new one put way more emphasis on positioning and headgames than 35% life combos, but the state of online was DIRE at launch. Much as I respect anime fighting games and NRS games, I feel like chasing endlessly high combos is going to get to some "Spiciness/Hopiness War" nonsense from the late 2010s...

    Avatar image for narficacid
    narficacid

    148

    Forum Posts

    119

    Wiki Points

    0

    Followers

    Reviews: 0

    User Lists: 1

    @undeadpool: I've been thinking about getting that most recent SamSho...only MOST of the reason is Baiken is in it, but I imagine the only time I'll get to mess around with it with other humans is if I bring it to a meet-up because I'm sure online is a ghost town now.

    As a constant jump-in'er I like games with air-dashing so it's maybe no surprise that I started this journey with Guilty Gear.

    Avatar image for narficacid
    narficacid

    148

    Forum Posts

    119

    Wiki Points

    0

    Followers

    Reviews: 0

    User Lists: 1

    @ben_h: Yeah, I'm deciding for myself where that line is for me as I learn. I am TRYING to approach my replays and my loses from a "what can I learn here" space. That said, the regret and shame kick in really easily when I look, and I see something "simple" that I flubbed. Still working on the "parts" that are defensive in me and seeing if they can "step back." (little taste of the new therapy that I'm learning about and doing some self-work with)

    I think the "am I happy at least 51% of the time in playing?" question is an important aspect for me. And so far, I would say I meet that metric, but if I cross into the, as you say, "bad mood more often than not" phase, I think I'll take a prolonged break from competitive...until Terry comes out.

    Going to in-person meet-ups was good for me to try to find some actual real-life mentors/friends who could help guide some learning and get feedback like the professor you described. Motivating, strengths-based teachers rock.

    I was accused of being a math major in my undergrad when I "got" calculus fairly fast, but I've not gone deeper than that. I feel like math is just tailor made to be something that makes people feel stupid because so much of it is conceptual and us humans, with our super-active frontal lobes, can't stop inventing new ways to try to understand our reality with it. I think I understood a few words in that wiki page you linked. lol

    Avatar image for undeadpool
    Undeadpool

    8444

    Forum Posts

    10761

    Wiki Points

    0

    Followers

    Reviews: 20

    User Lists: 19

    @narficacid: I wish they'd take another swing (of the SWORD!) at it, cause when I COULD get into a game, it was some of the most fun I've had in awhile. Normal fierces did, like, 1/3 health, it was very much about positioning and choosing the right moment. More arcade-y than something like Bushido Blade, but so much more of a slow, staid pace than even Street Fighter, much less anime fighters or NRS games.

    Ah well, c'est la vie. I haven't checked in awhile, maybe it rebounded slightly, but I'd assume anyone still on there is also CRAZY good at this point, I don't think it has much of an influx of rookies. But these are all assumptions on my part.

    This edit will also create new pages on Giant Bomb for:

    Beware, you are proposing to add brand new pages to the wiki along with your edits. Make sure this is what you intended. This will likely increase the time it takes for your changes to go live.

    Comment and Save

    Until you earn 1000 points all your submissions need to be vetted by other Giant Bomb users. This process takes no more than a few hours and we'll send you an email once approved.