Let's Talk About Dandelion

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flatblack

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#1  Edited By flatblack

Sensitive about super duper vague spoilers? Stop reading.

Still here? Cool.

During the game of the year podcasts both Brad and Dan discussed how they completely lost their momentum in The Witcher 3 right at the find Dandelion quest-line, despite feeling pretty great about the game up until that point. I realized that I was in that exact same boat. I was super high on the whole Crones and Bloody Baron quest, feelin' fine dicing up weird ass monsters and ghouls, right up until I got to the whack quest line that lead me running all over Novigrad talking to boring NPCs at 15 FPS for hours (I was playing on PS4). I eventually got tired of looking for fucking Dandelion and put the game down in favor of other upcoming releases.

After listening to The Besties game of the year podcast, it sounds like Polygon's Justin McElroy also tapped out at the exact same spot. This made me wonder, has anyone else had the same experience? Have you tried going back since? I really want to finish this game at some point, but after being away from it for so long and with 2016 releases already lining up hard and fast, I'm just not sure I'll be able to get over that Dandelion hump.

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mavs

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#2  Edited By mavs

I had the opposite experience? The game picked up momentum when I got to Novigrad, where you can't throw a stone without hitting a questgiver and you only need one method of travel to get to your destination.

I did fall off for about 3 weeks in Velen, where everything you want is in a swamp or at the bottom of a dark hole, and either way is over a ridge and across a lake and all the way on the other side of the map. Not to mention how unpleasant everything that lives there and happens there is.

But there's probably something about the structure of the game that makes it easy to put it down somewhere. I almost quit for good in Skellige, not because I hated the place but because I kept doing side quests yet the list barely seemed to get any shorter. Instead I just powered through the main story and I'm glad I did.

Also as a newcomer to the series I thought Dijkstra was the best damn character in the game. Every time he showed up the game got better.

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edgaras1103

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#3  Edited By edgaras1103

Never really had the problem. I like interacting with characters in video games besides killing them. But I played W1 and W2, so I know Zoltan and Dandelion from previous games and they were important to me. What I am saying is I expected different vibe coming from Velen to Novigrad based on W1 chapter 3 and W2 Chapter 2 Iorweth path. Novigrad quests are great because the overall atmosphere is different to Bloody Baron. The gang wars, scheming Dijkstra etc. were all great to me because I was ready to leave the wilderness of Velen to the busy streets of Novigrad.

I really wonder about why majority of internet complain about Novigrad stuff.

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KillEm_Dafoe

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It's the one part of the game I won't defend. It does drag quite a bit, but literally everything that surrounds that act is so good. It's worth getting through just to get to the rest of the story, trust me. It's not that long, however, and if you just mainline that segment and fast travel everywhere, I bet you can get through it at a decent pace, as boring as the actual content may be.

It took me a long time to get through, personally. At the time, I only had a few hours a week to play games, and the one or two nights a week I would play, I would either focus purely on side content or do a little bit of side stuff and a little of the main quest. Playing the more interesting side content alongside that portion of the story makes it easier to swallow, I think. There's just so much to do in the game, especially in Novigrad that I never really felt bored. Just that at a certain point in looking for Dandelion, that stuff was so bland that I wasn't sure that it even was the main quest.

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redyoshi

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#5  Edited By redyoshi

I can't really blame anyone for tapping out there, it did drag, but I was happy to give the game the benefit of the doubt based on the strength of the earlier story quests. If I had given up, I never would have gotten to later story sequences that effected me as much as anything I've ever played before.

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Wikitoups

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#6  Edited By Wikitoups

@mavs said:

I had the opposite experience? The game picked up momentum when I got to Novigrad, where you can't throw a stone without hitting a questgiver and you only need one method of travel to get to your destination.

I did fall off for about 3 weeks in Velen, where everything you want is in a swamp or at the bottom of a dark hole, and either way is over a ridge and across a lake and all the way on the other side of the map. Not to mention how unpleasant everything that lives there and happens there is.

But there's probably something about the structure of the game that makes it easy to put it down somewhere. I almost quit for good in Skellige, not because I hated the place but because I kept doing side quests yet the list barely seemed to get any shorter. Instead I just powered through the main story and I'm glad I did.

Also as a newcomer to the series I thought Dijkstra was the best damn character in the game. Every time he showed up the game got better.

I had the same thing happen to me, Velen was good and I did liked the pay off when you meet up with whoreson jr (I picked the talk option and it was soooo satisfying.)

Really did not liked Skellige cause I was getting witcher gear blue prints and most of them were there, and I payed for the maps cause I didn't want to explore all of the Islands.

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TheBlue

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The problem isn't Dandelion's quest. The problem is once you reach Novigrad a whole myriad of quests open up to you, not to mention a number of the quests in the finding Dandelion sequence branch off into other story lines. It can seem like it drags and takes forever if you end up taking on all of the side stuff. Finding Dandelion doesn't take that long if you mainline it. Also you could totally go to Skellige whenever. I know they scare you away with the red skull under the mission since you're probably underleveled, but you could go whenever you wanted.

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spraynardtatum

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I really really don't like looking for Dandelion or Ciri for that matter. I didn't care for the Bloody Baron quest line either. I thought the writing, while admirably open minded, was terrible. The writing in The Witcher 3 isn't all it's cracked up to be. It paints all characters in various shades of grey and then proceeds to beat you over the head with it. It all feels very forced and unbelievable. The good bits are there but they're a single pellet in a shotgun blast of substandard character development.

I continue to drop off this game but I also continue to come back for a few things. I really like Yennifer and some of the quest designs (when it gets past being an obnoxious game of NPC telephone) can be really inventive and cool.

Dandelions quest line was obnoxious. Truly bad.

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obcdexter

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I definitely remember not liking that questline one bit. It was the point in the game where I completely dropped off the main quest's path for dozens of hours and leveled Geralt into Op territory.

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Justin258

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I stopped playing for a few months in the middle of the find Dandelion quest. You shouldn't try to run straight through that quest, leave Novigrad after a few hours and go look for other quests. Go off the beaten path when you get to that part of the game, otherwise you'll burn out real quick.

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Hyuzen

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@theblue: That was my feeling too. Lots of side quests pop from the main dandelion search that it really felt like we were looking for him for 30 hours.

The way the story proceeds some of the Novigrad sidequests seem like they should be put on hold until after you find Dandelion, because of the way that one quest tells you to wrap up any important side quests. So I get why people would drop off playing the game. it's such a shame that the section isn't paced better because for as good as the Bloody Baron questline is, the second half/ last 1/3rd of that game is much better than what comes before.

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dkraytsberg

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Yeah I felt some serious fatigue in this area. The problem was that there were multiple story-related quests all in a big cluster in the area, and choosing to do one or the other felt like I was picking quests in a video game and not experiencing the quest naturally. I'm happy I powered through though, because the game just got better and better, which is why it ended up being my favorite experience all year. Especially now, trying to play Dragon Age: Inquisition and seeing just how much better The Witcher 3 was as a game and as a world.

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themangalist

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#14  Edited By themangalist

I'm surprised people dropped off at Novigrad because to me everything before was as much a slow burn as the Dandelion parts. I dropped off when I got to Skellige when I realized: "This game just isn't going to pick up anytime soon, huh?" I found the Bloody Baron, while very well written, still insanely slow-paced. Maybe it was the combat and levelling that I thought was very un-fun.

That leads me to wonder how The Witcher 2 ended up being one of my favourite games of all time. Was it as slow? I remember only falling in love with the game in Act III, which is the final and also shortest act of the game. Maybe I graduated and found full time employment since then. Maybe I just can't get into open-world games the same way i used to. I don't know anymore...

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eladren

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I think that of all the content in the game, the quests related to Dandelion are the most dependant on your previous knowledge or experience with the other games. To me the witcher games are always more than the sum of its parts, and particularly the wild hunt built a world that i wanted to inhabit, as such being on the road and finding Zoltan and Dandelion with their own torubles, and even more, knowing that dandelion was helping Ciri as best as he could was more than reason enough to keep me interested. I think that stems from my knowledge of dandelion as this hedonist character, that is kind of a lovable moron.

Also, Priscilla's arch is pretty good and touching.

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aktivity

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I'm doing my New Game+ right now and just finished the Dandelion arc. Looking at my quest-log it seems like there were more quests in the Bloody Baron arc. Still the Dandelion arc felt longer, because of how dense Novigrad is. I was constantly running into quests, whereas the wide open areas of Velen let me focus more on the Bloody Baron arc.

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csl316

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#17  Edited By csl316

The thing about Novigrad is that there's a bunch of cool stuff there. The main questline isn't amazing but Novigrad itself is full of awesome characters and well-done sidequests. It's a change of pace from the first area but felt just as engaging to me. It may feel longer but it didn't bore me one bit.

At that point in the game, I was getting fairly deep with the mechanics of the game and it all started to come together for me.

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ichthy

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#18  Edited By ichthy

I found Dandelion, but fell off super hard as soon as I got to Skellige. I think it also coincided with the point where I realized that the combat wasn't going to change meaningfully at all past the 50 hours I'd already put in.

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SSully

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I fell off at the exact same spot. I was so fucking high on that game from White Orchid, Velen, and absolutely loved the Red Baron stuff. After the Red Baron quest line I went immediately to Novigrad and slowly started falling off. I got half way to finding Danelion, from what others have told me, and I haven't been back to the game since.

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musclerider

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I actually don't remember that part dragging that badly. As someone who's played through the first two games I was excited to see him and do a little bit of catching up.

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nickhead

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#21  Edited By nickhead

While I agree that Novigrad may have dragged a bit, it felt totally normal to run all over the place looking for Dandelion. This is the 3rd game in the series - Dandelion is an established fuck-up that Geralt has had to save in the past. I know that isn't an excuse for a segment that turned off most players, but if you didn't play the first two games, why would you expect to care about him or the quest? Also, Novigrad opens up a myriad of other side quests that may get you off track but how is that different than any other RPG that inundates the player with side quests?

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ArtisanBreads

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#22  Edited By ArtisanBreads

I kind of don't get how this happens to people given how awesome the city is and all the other quests you can get into there. I do think having the main quest be "hey have you seen Ciri?" for a while, even if it dragged be through interesting areas, was not the best.

I just loved so many parts of the city I never experienced that kind of problem. Around Novigrad I was meeting all sorts of characters very important to Geralt.

I thought Alex was right on with GOTY basically saying this game was not made for them and it's not surprising they fell off of it given that.

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newmoneytrash

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i had the same experience but eventually went back, though i don't think it's the dandelion questline itself as much as it is the fact that a lot of

those dandelion quests spawn side quest chains off of them

if you just mainline the story it's fine, but that particular section throws a lot at you

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LawGamer

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A lot of it is that there are so many quests in that line, which is exacerbated by a fair number of them involving "Run from Point A to Point B on the entirely opposite end of Novigrad. Then run all the way back again." I found it enjoyable only because I'm a big fan of both the books and games, so I was probably a little more invested in the idea of a lot of running around trying to fix Dandelion's cock-ups. I agree that they could have paced the whole thing quite a bit better, though.

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deactivated-5cc8838532af0

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I've written about my dislike of that act a lot. It completely threw me off. It's such a staggering drop in both the momentum and quality of the writing that it's kept me from going back.

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fnrslvr

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I really like Yennifer

Wait -- why? Mind that Wild Hunt is my first exposure to The Witcher, but I found Yennefer to be utterly terrible.

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rethla

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@fnrslvr said:
@spraynardtatum said:

I really like Yennifer

Wait -- why? Mind that Wild Hunt is my first exposure to The Witcher, but I found Yennefer to be utterly terrible.

Yennefer is not in the other two games so you didnt miss anything about her.

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Counterclockwork87

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Yes, to me it is BY FAR the worst part of the game...I hated playing through it. I stopped for awhile there too. Thankfully, it gets better after that with Skellige/Yennefer/Ugly Baby till the end.

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ArtisanBreads

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#29  Edited By ArtisanBreads

@fnrslvr said:
@spraynardtatum said:

I really like Yennifer

Wait -- why? Mind that Wild Hunt is my first exposure to The Witcher, but I found Yennefer to be utterly terrible.

Yennifer worked for me in two ways:

1) She is a very strong willed and hard headed woman which is awesome to see in a game. Yeah she can be cold, a jerk, and reckless but she also fiercely defends the people she loves (you can play Geralt like this in the game if you want by the way). Also some of that attitude is very prevalent with mages throughout the Witcher series, which I always loved. Mages are very powerful and they act like it in a realistic way in these games. Not like other fantasy universes where mages are just any other person in attitude and temperament. Triss is a much softer, gentler person but is the exception for mages you see in the game. Also, if you go with Yennifer you do get some very sweet, gentle moments out of her with Geralt. I thought the Last Wish quest was very good at showing that side of her and showing how vulnerable she feels with Geralt because of their past. This is a woman who is constantly in control and with Geralt she is not and doesn't know how to handle that.

2) Given Geralt is a character and not just an avatar like many RPG characters, I liked to RP him a bit. I thought a world weary monster hunter having the love of his life be an extremely powerful and difficult to handle, ball busting woman was just too damn perfect. It works so well. And as I mention above, when the chips are on table she loves Geralt and does anything she can for him.

Yennifer is powerful and harsh on the outside but inside sweet to those she loves. She is extremely passionate. I liked that nuance a ton and found her very likable.

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OurSin_360

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#30  Edited By OurSin_360

I don't know, I thought the quests with Dandelion ended up being some of the most dark of them all (especially one side quest in particular, that i suggest you complete no matter how stupid it seems at first).

Dandelion was the homie from the first two games so i had no problem wanting to make sure he was alright and they did a good job of introducing Ciri enough that i felt a desire to make sure she was alright too. Yen on the other hand I had 0 attachment to, and honestly the quests involving her felt forced on me and Trish seemed thrown to the sideline.

I fell off after i had did the first 3 major quests and thought i was heading into the end game stuff, i got lost in doing side quests.

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inevpatoria

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#31  Edited By inevpatoria

I think you guys have nailed it already. Quests and questgivers just spiral out from the Dandelion thread faster than you can process them. And it isn't super clear which of the threads is the true critical path (not even sure there is one--to my recollection you have to tie up several separate loose ends before finally reuniting with the trabadour).

This chunks up the pacing a bit, considering the Bloody Baron quest carried a similar structure and was lengthy in its own right, often unfurling critical tributary quests like branches from a tree. That said, I was at that point way into the urban/Puritanical setting of Novigrad, having grown pretty tired over the previous 25+ hours of the swampy thickets of Velen. The slowing narrative pace was noticeable, but I felt like I had other things going on in the game to keep me motivated. Gear hunts and the assorted Witcher contract and what have you. By Novigrad I was so consumed with the game's writing that I would've needed more than a drawn-out questline to compel me to quit.

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FrodoBaggins

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I thought the change of pace and all the inner workings and politics of a huge city like Novigrad were a welcome addition.

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spraynardtatum

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@fnrslvr said:
@spraynardtatum said:

I really like Yennifer

Wait -- why? Mind that Wild Hunt is my first exposure to The Witcher, but I found Yennefer to be utterly terrible.

Yennifer worked for me in two ways:

1) She is a very strong willed and hard headed woman which is awesome to see in a game. Yeah she can be a jerk and reckless but she also fiercely defends the people she loves. Also some of that attitude is very prevalent with mages throughout the Witcher series, which I always loved. Mages are very powerful and they act like it in a realistic way in these games. Not like other fantasy universes where mages are just any other person in attitude and temperament. Triss is a much softer, gentler person but is the exception for mages you see in the game. Also, if you go with Yennifer you do get some very sweet, gentle moments out of her with Geralt. I thought the Last Wish quest was very good at showing that side of her and showing how vulnerable she feels with Geralt because of their past. This is a woman who is constantly in control and with Geralt she is not and doesn't know how to handle that.

2) Given Geralt is a character and not just an avatar like many RPG characters, I liked to RP him a bit. I thought a world weary monster hunter having the love of his life be an extremely powerful and difficult to handle, ball busting woman was just too damn perfect. It works so well. And as I mention above, when the chips are on table she loves Geralt and does anything she can for him.

I'm with the bread man here. She's a ball buster and she totally has Geralt wrapped around her finger but she is really sweet when she opens up. I liked their dynamic together.

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StarvingGamer

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#34  Edited By StarvingGamer

The real problem is that the Bloody Baron is far and away the best bit of storytelling in the game. It sets the bar real high real early and the game spends the next 70+ hours failing to match up.

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rethla

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So from what i gathered people get turned off becouse

1. Looking for Dandelion is a very fanservicy part of the game and for new Witcher players that arent established in the world and its characters its dragging out looking for people you dont care for or know the quirks of.

2. You are introduced to a myriad of new quests in Novigrad and for people that just wants to B-line the main mission it gets overwhelming. Usually i get bored when theres just to much stuff to do but when each little quest is worth playing on their own and not just a thing to tick off i dont mind. The only quest that dissapointed me was the detective hunt for that Vampire dude becouse the writing was sloppy beyond words.

3. The Dandelion questline is slower paced? I dont dont understand this but im also a fan of other slowpaced stuff like MGS, The order etc. so i might just not take notice when it aint nonstop action.

4. Its alot of walking back and forth... well thats the entire game, at least in Novigrad you dont have to walk so far.

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afabs515

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I dropped out at this point twice. I started the game on PS4, but then I had to move, and I kind of fell off of the game in the middle of the Dandelion questline. I was getting bored with it anyway, but I mostly attribute this to having to take time off from the game. On the other hand, I purchased the game again on Steam and started it over. I played up to the exact same point in the Dandelion questline, said "Fuck this," and stopped playing. Everything up to that point was so interesting, deep, and well-written; the Dandelion stuff felt like the story "spinning its wheels" as the bomb crew has said multiple times. Not finishing that game continues to be one of my biggest gaming regrets, because at the end of the Bloody Baron questline, I told my friend I was starting to like The Witcher 3 better than Persona 4, so there was obviously something there for me. But man, I just couldn't do it. If Dandelion had just been wherever in Novigrad, I probably never would have dropped off the game the second time.

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Zirilius

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#37  Edited By Zirilius

As someone who just recently started the game over and just got through this part the Dandelion stuff was a huge letdown. There's barely any "witchery" to be had during this part of the game. It's mostly run various parts of town, talk to a few people, run to another part of town, perform a play, and poof Dandelion is saved.

I felt the stuff with Triss was better executed than the Dandelion stuff and even that is somewhat a huge let down compared to Bloody Baron.

Well on to Skellige now.

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hatking

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I think that's crazy. I thought the part where you had you talk to his various partners was one of the more unique parts of the game.

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DeathByWaffle

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I enjoyed the quest line, but I definitely did have a feeling of "holy christ this is going on for a very long time" while doing it. Didn't make me want to stop playing the game or anything, but it did feel a bit excessive at some point.

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Fredchuckdave

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Zoltan is great, Dandelion is okay, he was better in 2 but he was barely in 2. Good questline on the whole.

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Maluvin

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I'm replaying the Witcher 3 right now and I'm now of the opinion that Novigrad is really problematic from a design perspective that I didn't appreciate on my first playthrough. Novigrad is kind of a reunion area if you played the previous two games because you run into so many characters that were a part of those titles like Zoltan, Radovich, Dandelion, Vernon, Ves, and, of course Triss. If you have a familiarity with all of those characters I think those encounters have more impact and meaning. If you don't have that background it feels like more political busywork and sidequest-like errand running. I had that background and therefore had no problem enjoying Novigrad but it is bad design problem to leave new players out in the cold IMO.

Dandelion is kind of a tricky character in W3. He has more heart and depth than his exterior and mannerisms would immediately suggest but even with that caveat I do feel like his actions aren't especially compelling in W3, not enough to carry his part of Novigrad without that background familiarity. Also, I don't think they do enough to remind the player that he's the Narrator for the whole game. He's telling Geralt's story and should come across as a stronger figure than he does.

Triss is tricky too. If you had a romance history with her previously I feel like her sections in W3 are good but if you don't have that her quests have less of an impact perhaps. Also if you have Yennefer front and center in your mind (as the story kind of sets you up to do in the beginning) then Novigrad is another long period of being away from her and Triss just ends up being another sorceress Geralt runs into after Keira.

Even without the backstory and/or romance dynamics I'm just not positive that you get enough of the friendship aspects between Geralt and Triss and Dandelion in W3 and that's a shame.

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aktivity

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@fnrslvr said:
@spraynardtatum said:

I really like Yennifer

Wait -- why? Mind that Wild Hunt is my first exposure to The Witcher, but I found Yennefer to be utterly terrible.

I like female characters like Yen or Morrigan that come off very pragmatic and cold. But spend enough time with them and they'll occasionally show how caring they actually are. I felt really bad for Yen in this game though, she burns all the bridges to save Ciri and her existence barely gets noticed by Ciri.

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Skald

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#43  Edited By Skald

I dropped out after getting to Skellige. Like Novigrad, it piled on so many new characters and quests that I couldn't take the time to appreciate them all.

I eventually came back and played all the way through, but the pacing of this game is weird.

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Viqor

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@maluvin: I think you may have hit the nail on the head. I had no problems with that section of the game, but I'm all in on the Witcher (played both games, read all the books, etc). Looking back, a lot of the pleasure I got from that section was derived from seeing familiar faces and catching up with old acquaintances. In retrospect, even though it didn't affect my experience, it may have been a bad the idea for them to rely so heavily on returning characters in this one portion of the game. Looking at the comments, it seems that it put off quite a few newcomers.

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deactivated-57ec1020ef4eb

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I'm just not sure why people would expect to be able to pick up the third game in a very story-heavy series and get nearly as much out of it. That would be like getting MGS4 and complaining that you don't know who any of the characters are. Games/movies/whatever shouldn't have to cater to people who jump in midway through a series.

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flatblack

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#46  Edited By flatblack

@hatking: Talking to his various partners was the aspect that specifically turned me off of the game.

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GERALTITUDE

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I got bogged down here but then I remembered..

OH YEAH.

THERE 10,000 OTHER QUESTS TO DO.

So, rather than feeling bound by the pacing of the main quest, I just started mixing and matching quests to my mood. Because of this style of play my "Dandelion Arc" ended up being well over 50 hours all on it's own, but in the end this was an amazing 50 hours.

"Pacing" is a bizarre concept in games. Take me for example. I don't fast travel in the Witcher. And I usually walk in towns. In fact I walk a lot, period. So my pacing is nothing at all like someone who is fast travelling back and forth trying to complete quests quickly. It's not that my pacing is slow and theirs is fast, more importantly: I'm not in a rush.

But, more than these quirks of playing, the order you do quests in is so, so important. I feel I can almost objectively say that if you only do the main quests in the Witcher 3 you will be annoyed by the "pacing" of the game. But I also feel that playing the Witcher like that is madness, so it's kind of your own doom. I loved mixing quest types up in this game more than any other because "minor quests" and hunts are some of the best. This isn't Dragon Age where the only interesting quests are character specific or main quests...

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The Dandelion stuff was kind of exactly what I wanted at the time I did it. I spent tons of time outside Velen, doing everything in sight, to the fucking point of near burn out. It felt like I spent more time just killing shit then talking to anyone.

See, I actually enjoyed the combat in Witcher, but when I got to Novigrad, I began meeting tons of familiar faces, having long dialogue sessions, and frankly, getting exactly what I wanted from The Witcher.

And controversial opinion: I didn't find the Bloody Baron shit nearly as mind blowing as others. That's fine, but it's definitely been really surprising to me since GOTY how much praise it's gotten. It's great, like Witcher 3 on the whole, but, personally, the Skellige storyline, Kaer Morhen, and late game quests I'd put well above the Baron. Yes, even the Dandelion section.

I do wonder if my view on the Baron is a little clouded, though, since my first run it was a little... positive? Like, I don't know, I'm on mobile so I can't spoiler it in detail, but if you know that portion of the game well, let's just say everything ended kind of... okay, relatively speaking, for the Baron Family. Everything else around that stuff left me confused, and not sure how I got there.

It especially didn't help spending like 10 hours wandering the map after my first meeting of the Baron. I barely remembered who the fuck he was by the time I got to his quest line, and by that point had come off of loving the Keira Metz quests.

Geez, sorry for the rambling. Witcher 3 sure is a good game, huh?

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Niceguydan8

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@nev: I thought outside of some really late game Geralt+Ciri stuff that the Baron was touching because it was easier to relate to. While I definitely agree I appreciated other moments more in the story, I think the Bloody Baron's situation is rooted in something a lot more realistic than other scenarios in the game despite all of it being in a fantasy setting.

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I honestly think people drop off there because it's a long session of talking to people and watching cut scenes that develop the City of Novigrad, it's inhabitants and who Dandelion is. There's barely any combat and barely any action, there's little to no fantasy themes it's all very grounded and very much about introducing Dandelion's character vicariously through the lives of varying people within Novigrad. I actually thought the writing of the quest line was quite brilliant because if you didn't know who Dandelion was it did a fantastic job of letting you know the exact type of weasel Dandelion is before even seeing his face.

I thought things like the play you put on to bring out Dudu from hiding or teaching the Nilfgaardian girl how to sword fight were a prime example of what sets The Witcher apart from other RPG's. Not everything is about saving the world or some grand hero achievements. Sometimes Geralt just deals with people and has to help the people around him.

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