Engadget did not report a leaked pre-announcement Xbox One in favor of preview coverage

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#51 Posted by aktivity (316 posts) -

@pezen: I think we differ on what we consider journalism. You seem to only place value in "hard hitting" stories, whereas I find factual information/screens on unreleased games also hold value.
I don't see how a game press releasing information on unreleased games/consoles can possibly be considered click-bait or not worthy of journalism. In the game industry next to those rare big stories, this is as good as it gets. I prefer to see them putting that kind of work, rather then being forced to write top ten articles for clicks.

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#52 Posted by mems1224 (1616 posts) -

meh, wouldn't have been that interesting of a story to me. dont see the big deal.

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#53 Posted by MindBullet (558 posts) -

Keep in mind that Engadget didn't actually have the console. They just kind of... Knew a guy who did. The guy who had the console was only interested in returning it or selling it, so unless Engadget bought it off him (which would be a SUPER BAD IDEA), any article they published would have been akin to "EXCLUSIVE PHOTOS OF THE NEW XBOX AS SEEN BY THIS ONE GUY IN MIAMI".

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#54 Posted by imsh_pl (4207 posts) -
@aktivity said:

I've always found the way people disregard game press as just video-games really disrespectful of the people working in it. There are people in the industry that take their job serious and work hard to break stories whether on working conditions or leaks. Journalistic integrity should apply across the board not just on big stories. I very rarely find myself agreeing with Colin, but on this one I do.

Video game journalism isn't disregarded because it's about video games, it's disregarded because it's mostly a joke. There's hardly any investigative journalism involved, and most of the 'stories' is just information about 'teh new hot gamez' spoonfed to media outlets by developers and publishers. It's almost as bad as tech 'journalism' which is basically a 3rd party marketing department for companies selling electronics.

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#55 Posted by jakob187 (22932 posts) -

@finaldasa: We were specifically told by those companies that because of scores on those games (which we had received review copies for) that we were denied review copies in the future.

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#56 Posted by dudeglove (12572 posts) -

@imsh_pl said:
@aktivity said:

I've always found the way people disregard game press as just video-games really disrespectful of the people working in it. There are people in the industry that take their job serious and work hard to break stories whether on working conditions or leaks. Journalistic integrity should apply across the board not just on big stories. I very rarely find myself agreeing with Colin, but on this one I do.

Video game journalism isn't disregarded because it's about video games, it's disregarded because it's mostly a joke. There's hardly any investigative journalism involved, and most of the 'stories' is just information about 'teh new hot gamez' spoonfed to media outlets by developers and publishers. It's almost as bad as tech 'journalism' which is basically a 3rd party marketing department for companies selling electronics.

I agree with you, but I think it's important to note the reasons for this. Journalism overall as an industry, as, like, a career path has suffered immensely since the early 2000s when the biggest agencies and outlets like Reuters and the BBC fired a ton of staff and/or put everyone on yearly contracts at best (and everyone else has since followed suit). Signing up to work for most media companies these days is zero guarantee that you will be tenured to work for them for longer than a year. For instance, I'm about to send off a resume to one place where the job description specifically says 11 months.

Another big factor of course is the internet and shifting revenue models. This has resulted in two main things: people who might normally work as journalists are now working in PR because PR is stable (also meaning the journalist to PR ratio is insane), and journalists are expected to churn out stories because they're basically trying to compete with the internet (which is damn near impossible) because that's how revenue gets in. It's why things like freelancers are such a big deal, because employers don't have to deal with pesky things like health insurance by not employing full time. The whole situation is frankly just fucked.

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