Anjon's forum posts

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#1 Posted by Anjon (178 posts) -

I was going to make a huge salty thread on glaring plotholes, but then I thought "Actually, there's no way the devs didn't think about these. They're probably hard at work making DLC to fill those in." So instead I'd like to make a huge sweet thread on things we'd like to see addressed in a DLC supplement or something. With a $20 season pass, surely we're getting something besides gear and weapon skins, right? This turns my glaring plothole-induced rage into lighthearted hope for the future! So, here're some things I hope they address somewhere down the line. I'd love to hear some other ideas!

1. With Booker constantly caught in the loop caused by the Lucetes, one of them has to escape it somehow and then become Comstock. How does he do that? Do the Lucetes bring him out and thus undo Elizabeth's murder-suicide plot?

2. That thread title isn't a typo! I want to know more about Constance, the little girl from some of the voxophone recordings. I have a theory that she has the ability to alter time and space similar to Elizabeth. She might actually be another Elizabeth. She mentions she wants to meet Liz because she believe they have something special in common with eachother. Later in the game, she says "I'm sorry about your mom being dead. I believe she's very much better than my own." or something to that affect. She then indicates that she knows more about Elizabeth's tower than pretty much anyone else.

3. Elizabeth says she inherited her power from Lady Comstock, who remains unnamed throughout the game. At first I thought she was just another Elizabeth, which might still be the case, but I think it's more likely that she's Booker's wife who died in his timeline shortly after Elizabeth was born. I'm guessing Comstock found a timeline where she wasn't dead and took her out of it, but she was sterile, possibly from the jump. In any case, she's a time-traveling space ghost, and that'd probably make an interesting subplot.

4. Why exactly did the Lucetes want to rescue Elizabeth from Comstock in the first place? I remember a voxophone hinting that the male Lucete didn't want to and tried to blackmail the female Lucete into canceling the plan, but why did the female Lucete want to do it? It didn't seem like revenge for Comstock trying to murder them, and it didn't seem like the Lucetes cared if one version of New York was destroyed. Why do beings who've essentially achieved omniscience and exist in all time and space simultaneously care about these handful of timelines?

5. Is the Songbird an alternate universe version of Booker who was captured and turned into an automaton? On the instruction card, it shows an image of Comstock's brain as a machine, so I thought that was pretty obvious. That'd be a pretty interesting scenario.

6. This is my personal best theory as to what first DLC campaign will center around. Booker clearly thought that by killing Comstock, he would give Elizabeth a better life... yet he essentially killed her reeeeally hard. I imagine a multi-dimensional obliteration is about as dead as you can possibly be, and he clearly didn't expect that to happen (probably because he's a moron). I'm predicting that whatever DLC comes out is going to feature Lucetes bringing him out of a loop and trying to save Elizabeth.

7. Honorable Mentions: something something Bioshock, something something Andrew Ryan. I'm hoping there isn't anything related to the original Bioshock but if fans request it, it'll probably happen...

8. Honorable Mentions: Some kind of DLC campaign or mini-game that somehow involves Elizabeth throwing coins at us constantly. Sometimes through walls.

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#2 Posted by Anjon (178 posts) -
@jace said:

It's almost like I knew he'd link the Anita S. video. Too bad he's already married or they could wage the war on logic together, happily ever after.

I love how you ignored the entire rest of this article to focus solely on the Anita video posted innocuously amongst a batch of equally engaging content, armed with your witty retort towards an argument no one started. Your Anita Sarkeesian senses are surely tingling this day.

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#3 Posted by Anjon (178 posts) -

1. Devil May Cry 3 showed me that combat in a game could be more than just mashing buttons or shooting at dudes. I know that technically DMC1 could have done the same thing, but the fact that it was decidedly easier meant that at no point were you ever expected to master or even become decent at any of the game;s systems. There was a degree of scrub-friendliness that allowed you to progress if you brute-forced it hard enough. DMC3 wasn't at all like that. It demanded more of the player than any other action game available at the time. This has given it the reputation of being a "hard game", but it really isn't. It just expects you to know how to play it and punishes you for slacking off. It respects the player and asks that the player respects it in return. Every action game I've played since now gets compared to DMC3 in terms of combat design. Since then, its spot has been taken by Bayonetta, but you never forget your first....
 
2. Street Fighter III: Third Strike inspired me to get down into the nitty gritty about game design in general, because simply learning to play it decently meant you had to know how the programming worked. I learned about frames and how to count them, I learned about button priority, animation priority, hitboxes, hurt boxes, and generally how to get the best out of a game on both a technical and casual level. Third Strike is also just a beautiful example of 2D animation in a video game. It remains one of the prettiest fighting games to this day.  3S in combination with DMC3 eventually helped me development my own theories of game design which I'll hopefully put into practice one day.
 
3. Klonoa 2: Lunatea's Veil is probably the first game I've ever become emotionally invested in on both a gameplay and story level. The themes were surprisingly mature and actually got me to wonder about some pretty complicated societal issues. While I've never actually cried during the ending of  a game, this is probably the closest I've ever gotten to doing so, granted I was pretty young at the time. Gameplay wise, the game is essentially a puzzle platformer with some light combat. The puzzles are designed in such ways many of the tougher ones require some kind of "sacrifice" to solve. Sometimes you'll have a difficult time progressing to a portion of the level, then reach a puzzle that seems to want you to throw all that progress away in order to solve it. Then there're my favorites that feel like you're breaking the game to solve them, but the solution is almost certainly intended by the developer. Not many puzzle games nowadays would attempt something like that.
 
4. Skullgirls is kind of weird, but definitely belongs on this kind of list for me. It completely changed the way I see fighting games and the future of game development. Lead programmer Mike Z has gone above and beyond in order to bring this game to the public and is generally an easily approachable guy. He answers questions almost without hesitation, even when he probably shouldn't, and I've learned invaluable information about game development leading up to and following Skullgirls' release. The game is still a very player-driven experience with a perfect blend of fan influence and creativity. There are features in it that players have asked to be included in fighting games for over 10 years, and now big budget developers are shamelessly copying them, which is great. Anything that changes the fighting game industry for the better is welcome. Capcom even directly credits Skullgirls for some of its new features in current fighting games, and fans are constantly telling other developers to "make it like Skullgirls".
 
5. The Sonic the Hedgehog franchise got me into gaming as more than just a toy to sometimes play with friends. The Sega Genesis was the first game console I've personally owned, and Sonic the Hedgehog was one of the first games I've personally owned and beaten. Sonic was my gateway into gaming. He easily became my favorite video character, and I became so obsessed with the series that I would literally buy any Sonic game that came out, even if I had to purchase a new console to do so, which is exactly why I bought the Sega Dreamcast (no regrets). This series made platformers my favorite genre, which holds true today despite them being virtually an endangered species at this point. Sonic 3 & Knuckles is still probably my favorite game of all time, and Sonic Adventure is still kind of close it. Unfortunately the franchise dropped off the map after Sonic Adventure, the developer Sonic Team was disbanded, and not a single Sonic game has been made since.

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#4 Posted by Anjon (178 posts) -
@PerfidiousSinn: Go Voldo or go home.
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#5 Posted by Anjon (178 posts) -
@DarthOrange: Oh wow... Yeah, that's super creepy. Of all the characters they could have went with, they chose Ivy? Why not Nightmare or someone else who doesn't sound like a middle-aged woman trying to pick up guys at a game store?
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#6 Posted by Anjon (178 posts) -
@Ryanmgraef said:
Maaan. I got a call from Anna or Nina Williams I can't remember which when trekked tag 2 came out. It was really embarrassing too.
That sounds pretty great. Not too sure why that would be embarrassing though. Unless it was an actual conversation and not a recording?
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#7 Posted by Anjon (178 posts) -

Back in the day, Nintendo had a habit of contacting people who pre-ordered certain games via phone and hitting them with a special "Thank you" message for being interested in the game. The only one I remember personally was for Super Mario Sunshine, which got me a phone call saying "Itsa me! Mario! Thank you for-a playing my game!" or something along those lines. Does anyone still do that anymore? It was a pretty cool, personal touch that I've (shamefully) forgotten over the years, but it just randomly came back to me. These could still be happening, but I don't know...

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#8 Edited by Anjon (178 posts) -
@Taku128 said:

@Anjon said:

@Taku128 said:

@Anjon said:

Events shift in 999 when they really shouldn't. For example, there's a character who can die if you choose a certain course of action, but that action has nothing to do with them nor how they die. It's just an arbitrary change much like Heavy Rain's arbitrary changes.

I got every ending in 999 and have no idea what you're talking about. Your path opens up situations for certain things to happen that wouldn't in other storylines, but there's never an instance where something happens in one playthrough that should've happened in the others but didn't, at least not that I can remember.

I distinctly remember a situation where a certain character that originally died had escaped death for seemingly no reason when I got different endings. It's been a while since I've played it, but that stuck out to me as being a real "What are you trying to pull, game!?" moment. Though I haven't played VLR, so maybe they explain it in some crazy pseudo-science-y way later on in the timeline. Maybe Mantorok had something to do with it. Apologies for incredibly obscure references.

Could you spoiler tag what you're talking about? The only situation I could think of would be

*MAJOR 999 SPOILERS INSIDE TAG*

Wow, that's actually what I was talking about, but I was remembering it very differently, probably since I basically ran through all of the endings in that game in about a day, all while screaming "WTF" every few minutes. The game doesn't really take care in explaining its crazy twists, so there's so much stuff that got bogged down that I still don't understand. A lot of it is probably weird "anime" stuff like (not really a spoiler since it starts right at the beginning), why does Junpei actually care about Akane to the point of doing the things he does in the different ending paths when he literally forgot she existed until she literally tackled him to the ground and rubbed her face all over him? Is that just an anime thing or did they explain that in a twist? I remember a twist involving them that kiiiiiind of seemed like it was implying something about that but the game is just full of twists literally every 5 minutes or so and it all starts to feel very silly... but that's just my opinion. In any case, that dead character thing isn't as despicable as I thought it was. I thought it was some straight up David Cage-ian mess.
 
Edit: In retrospect, I guess having twists on top of twists on top of twists is also an "anime thing"...
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#9 Posted by Anjon (178 posts) -
@Taku128 said:

@Anjon said:

Events shift in 999 when they really shouldn't. For example, there's a character who can die if you choose a certain course of action, but that action has nothing to do with them nor how they die. It's just an arbitrary change much like Heavy Rain's arbitrary changes.

I got every ending in 999 and have no idea what you're talking about. Your path opens up situations for certain things to happen that wouldn't in other storylines, but there's never an instance where something happens in one playthrough that should've happened in the others but didn't, at least not that I can remember.

I distinctly remember a situation where a certain character that originally died had escaped death for seemingly no reason when I got different endings. It's been a while since I've played it, but that stuck out to me as being a real "What are you trying to pull, game!?" moment. Though I haven't played VLR, so maybe they explain it in some crazy pseudo-science-y way later on in the timeline. Maybe Mantorok had something to do with it.
 
 
 

Apologies for incredibly obscure references.
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#10 Posted by Anjon (178 posts) -

Glad to see someone repping VNs! It's just disappointing that this is the game that really introduces Western audiences to the genre, because all of those problems Patrick mentioned about the redundant text, obtuse puzzles, and juvenile humor are all pretty infuriating when trying to get through 999. Also, the deeper you get into the mechanics, the more annoyed you become. Events shift in 999 when they really shouldn't. For example, there's a character who can die if you choose a certain course of action, but  that action has nothing to do with them nor how they die. It's just an arbitrary change much like Heavy Rain's arbitrary changes. I've heard some people assuming that VNs are just like that, but that's not true at all! There're a lot of great VNs with amazing stories that don't get bogged down by this stuff.
 
While I'm ultimately unhappy with how 999 represents visual novels, it is the most successful attempt so far at bringing the genre to mainstream Western audiences (though I heard the Lost in Blue series for DS was pretty good). It's also the closest a VN has come to being a "game", despite how those parts might have turned out.