Giant Bomb News

1698 Comments

From #1reasonwhy to #1reasontobe, and 1,600 Comments In-Between

Some thoughts on the fiery discussion prompted at Giant Bomb and elsewhere by a Twitter hashtag meant to raise awareness of sexism in the video game industry.

As with Mirror's Edge, the upcoming Tomb Raider revival was penned by Rhianna Pratchett, and tells the story of how Lara Croft came to be.

A tweet alone cannot change anything, but enough tweets can become a movement, a movement can raise awareness, and awareness can lead to action. That’s the potential power behind #1reasonwhy, a hashtag from this weekend encouraging women members of the games industry to speak up with stories of their own difficulties, and raise needed awareness about industry sexism.

#1reasonwhy is, by design, full of upsetting, troubling, and negative stories about what it’s like to be a woman that’s making video games in 2012, and games writer Rhianna Pratchett (the upcoming Tomb Raider reboot, Mirror’s Edge, Heavenly Sword) figured something more positive would be of use. Thus, the creation of #1reasontobe, a hashtag with reasons why women are part of the industry at this very moment, should continue to be part of the industry, and call attention to the many stories of strong, independent women succeeding in games--or trying.

Here are a few of their stories:

#1reasonwhy is important, but I’m creating #1reasontobe because I’d like female devs to share why they're in games & what they get from it.

— Rhianna Pratchett (@rhipratchett) November 27, 2012

So our children can see women succeeding in tech and games, and not know why it would ever be any different. #1reasontobe

— strange language (@neuralwiles) November 27, 2012

#1reasontobe Because of the jobs I've had in the past ~7 years, the ones where I create game-related things make me the most happy.

— Eve Walter (@MidnightRem) November 27, 2012

Because my daughter plays video games, she loves video games, and she needs role models who have come before her to be strong. #1reasontobe

— CK Burch (@ckburch) November 27, 2012

#1reasontobe Because when you find a game company who values everyone's opinion, you can just concentrate on making phenomenal games.

— Lindz (@lindzart) November 27, 2012

#1reasontobe - After years of work & careers which left me unfulfilled and outcast from so much, I've found a welcome & passionate home.

— Donna Prior (@_Danicia_) November 27, 2012

There is a growing diverse, queer culture that needs more voice, and games can give it to them. Now let us have it #1ReasonToBe

— Mattie Brice (@xMattieBrice) November 27, 2012

#1reasontobe Despite the bullshit, I am able to work constantly with amazing men and women who care about telling great stories

— Lillian Cohen-Moore (@lilyorit) November 27, 2012

#1reasontobe Because most men in the industry are accepting/inclusive/supportive. Don't let the bad apples dissuade you from going for it.

— LM Lockhart (@missdoomcookie) November 27, 2012

And #1reasontobe is that the only way to change things is to be part of the change. #wecandobetter

— Kathleen (@ninjaharlot) November 27, 2012

#1reasontobe When you get feedback from players that your game changed their life in some way, let them be the hero for once

— Tara J. Brannigan (@kindofstrange) November 27, 2012

#1reasontobe Cuz at their best, games push new boundaries in experience, and we're like 0.5% of the way to getting good at that. Define it!

— AngelosLH (@AngelosLH) November 27, 2012

#1ReasonToBe Because my presence here is changing the industry.

— Ceri Young (@Toughlovemuse) November 27, 2012

It’s good #1reasontobe exists. A problem isn’t solved without a solution, and #1reasontobe provides the disenchanted with glimmers of hope we can work towards a better environment. The next step is creating accessible avenues for people to make connections beyond Twitter, which #1reasonmentor aspires towards.

I haven’t done the math, but yesterday’s article about #1reasonwhy probably broke a comments record on Giant Bomb. I stopped reading the thread after it passed 500 or so comments, both because it’s pretty unwieldy in our current system, and I was roundly discouraged by some of the discussion.

Much of the response felt driven by a feeling that talking about #1reasonwhy, and thereby discussing problems women having in the games industry, suddenly means there are zero problems for men. Elevating the discussion of misogyny implies there is no misandry, or so the argument goes. I don’t buy that, and have trouble reasoning with people who continue to peddle it. Bringing up one very real problem does not invalidate other very real problems, but being so dismissive of the argument suggests you aren’t taking the original argument seriously, and instead want to discredit it because you don’t believe it has any merit in the first place. At least be honest.

I do not consider myself a feminist or particularly aligned with the feminist movement. I just know bullshit when I see it, and I'm tired of bullshit that involves the vapid, shallow arguments that crawl out of the comments section of every single website whenever this subject comes out. It feels like the same 50 people are just making dupe accounts across the Internet, and making sure to drown out any real conversation. Those people deserve a chance to be heard, and that includes the larger-than-you'd-think audience of women right here on Giant Bomb.

Maybe I’m just wading into an unwinnable argument, but I wanted to paste a comment that seemed emblematic of so much of the 1,600 comment (and still growing) thread.

I actually don’t have much of a problem with this comment, except for the fact that it was made at all. Video games, like any entertainment medium, are just a hobby to a vast majority of the audience, and their daily lives are filled with concerns vastly more important than the dynamics between men and women in the games industry. That is 100% okay, as there are plenty of things that I enjoy where I’ve done little-to-no research about whether I’m comfortable with all that’s happening behind-the-scenes. Still, you took the time to scroll to the bottom of this article, long after the achievement for a first post was possible, and post a comment that amounts to little more than trolling. There is no opinion here, and we’d all be better off if the discussion, positive or negative, didn’t include pointless derailment.

This isn’t all of you, obviously, and many of you made substantive arguments, even if I disagreed. I suppose the biggest problem I have is with the tone, the dismissiveness, the idea that none of this matters, and that if people only just spoke up at their jobs, engaged with sexual harassment laws (which is hardly the most pervasive issue), changed their attitude, this would just go away. “I have a solution, just grow some fucking balls,” was one comment that stuck out on page 20-something of the comments. There is a reason why it’s not easy to just “grow some fucking balls,” and it’s because of the response these subjects generate, and the seemingly futile nature of having this debate in a public forum. Not to mention that if you’re looking at the current layoff happy climate of the games industry, speaking up about this issue and possibly risking your job if it backfires doesn’t sound like the greatest idea ever.

If you were a woman at a game developer, would you want to speak up after reading that thread, or the countless others that sprouted up yesterday? Twitter is, at least, a place where you can do filtering and hear voices you regard.

“I’ve been watching the #1reasonwhy hashtag on Twitter with an anxious kind of understanding,” said games writer Katie Williams in a blog not long after #1reasonwhy started catching fire. “Like, part of me wants to jump right in and post a dozen of my own experiences, but I’ve also learned what happens if you say that shit publicly: you’re berated, blamed, dismissed. I’ve been there.”

She is not alone, and I don’t blame her for it.

I suspect there's an underlying fear involved in all of this, as well. "What does this mean for the games we love? What if we're okay with how games are made already? Don't ruin them!" Change, while painful, is often healthy, but I'm also realistic. I don't expect drastic change due to market realities--what sells well will continue to sell well, and that includes plenty of dudebro that, hey, I also enjoy playing! You know, even if the Entertainment Software Association does report that 47% of all game players are women. If there's better women representation in development, those people given a bigger voice, it's not going to make the video games you already enjoy go away. But maybe it means video game companies will be more willing to create games for a growing audience who play games because they love games but do not have characters that speak to them. It might not change publishers who release games with women protagonists but don't support them with marketing, but change happens slowly.

Again, it’s weird. I’m a guy, I’ve never had to deal with any of these problems. But I’m willing to admit where there’s smoke, there’s probably fire, and listening is helpful, informative. If you don’t want to listen, you don’t have to. No one is forcing you. Just stop shouting down others who want to.

As with last time, I'll leave you with my own contribution, this time for #1reasontobe.

#1reasontobe Because we need strong female role models, and more of them. It won't solve everything, but it's a start.

— Patrick Klepek (@patrickklepek) November 28, 2012
Patrick Klepek on Google+
1698 Comments
Posted by patrickklepek
As with Mirror's Edge, the upcoming Tomb Raider revival was penned by Rhianna Pratchett, and tells the story of how Lara Croft came to be.

A tweet alone cannot change anything, but enough tweets can become a movement, a movement can raise awareness, and awareness can lead to action. That’s the potential power behind #1reasonwhy, a hashtag from this weekend encouraging women members of the games industry to speak up with stories of their own difficulties, and raise needed awareness about industry sexism.

#1reasonwhy is, by design, full of upsetting, troubling, and negative stories about what it’s like to be a woman that’s making video games in 2012, and games writer Rhianna Pratchett (the upcoming Tomb Raider reboot, Mirror’s Edge, Heavenly Sword) figured something more positive would be of use. Thus, the creation of #1reasontobe, a hashtag with reasons why women are part of the industry at this very moment, should continue to be part of the industry, and call attention to the many stories of strong, independent women succeeding in games--or trying.

Here are a few of their stories:

#1reasonwhy is important, but I’m creating #1reasontobe because I’d like female devs to share why they're in games & what they get from it.

— Rhianna Pratchett (@rhipratchett) November 27, 2012

So our children can see women succeeding in tech and games, and not know why it would ever be any different. #1reasontobe

— strange language (@neuralwiles) November 27, 2012

#1reasontobe Because of the jobs I've had in the past ~7 years, the ones where I create game-related things make me the most happy.

— Eve Walter (@MidnightRem) November 27, 2012

Because my daughter plays video games, she loves video games, and she needs role models who have come before her to be strong. #1reasontobe

— CK Burch (@ckburch) November 27, 2012

#1reasontobe Because when you find a game company who values everyone's opinion, you can just concentrate on making phenomenal games.

— Lindz (@lindzart) November 27, 2012

#1reasontobe - After years of work & careers which left me unfulfilled and outcast from so much, I've found a welcome & passionate home.

— Donna Prior (@_Danicia_) November 27, 2012

There is a growing diverse, queer culture that needs more voice, and games can give it to them. Now let us have it #1ReasonToBe

— Mattie Brice (@xMattieBrice) November 27, 2012

#1reasontobe Despite the bullshit, I am able to work constantly with amazing men and women who care about telling great stories

— Lillian Cohen-Moore (@lilyorit) November 27, 2012

#1reasontobe Because most men in the industry are accepting/inclusive/supportive. Don't let the bad apples dissuade you from going for it.

— LM Lockhart (@missdoomcookie) November 27, 2012

And #1reasontobe is that the only way to change things is to be part of the change. #wecandobetter

— Kathleen (@ninjaharlot) November 27, 2012

#1reasontobe When you get feedback from players that your game changed their life in some way, let them be the hero for once

— Tara J. Brannigan (@kindofstrange) November 27, 2012

#1reasontobe Cuz at their best, games push new boundaries in experience, and we're like 0.5% of the way to getting good at that. Define it!

— AngelosLH (@AngelosLH) November 27, 2012

#1ReasonToBe Because my presence here is changing the industry.

— Ceri Young (@Toughlovemuse) November 27, 2012

It’s good #1reasontobe exists. A problem isn’t solved without a solution, and #1reasontobe provides the disenchanted with glimmers of hope we can work towards a better environment. The next step is creating accessible avenues for people to make connections beyond Twitter, which #1reasonmentor aspires towards.

I haven’t done the math, but yesterday’s article about #1reasonwhy probably broke a comments record on Giant Bomb. I stopped reading the thread after it passed 500 or so comments, both because it’s pretty unwieldy in our current system, and I was roundly discouraged by some of the discussion.

Much of the response felt driven by a feeling that talking about #1reasonwhy, and thereby discussing problems women having in the games industry, suddenly means there are zero problems for men. Elevating the discussion of misogyny implies there is no misandry, or so the argument goes. I don’t buy that, and have trouble reasoning with people who continue to peddle it. Bringing up one very real problem does not invalidate other very real problems, but being so dismissive of the argument suggests you aren’t taking the original argument seriously, and instead want to discredit it because you don’t believe it has any merit in the first place. At least be honest.

I do not consider myself a feminist or particularly aligned with the feminist movement. I just know bullshit when I see it, and I'm tired of bullshit that involves the vapid, shallow arguments that crawl out of the comments section of every single website whenever this subject comes out. It feels like the same 50 people are just making dupe accounts across the Internet, and making sure to drown out any real conversation. Those people deserve a chance to be heard, and that includes the larger-than-you'd-think audience of women right here on Giant Bomb.

Maybe I’m just wading into an unwinnable argument, but I wanted to paste a comment that seemed emblematic of so much of the 1,600 comment (and still growing) thread.

I actually don’t have much of a problem with this comment, except for the fact that it was made at all. Video games, like any entertainment medium, are just a hobby to a vast majority of the audience, and their daily lives are filled with concerns vastly more important than the dynamics between men and women in the games industry. That is 100% okay, as there are plenty of things that I enjoy where I’ve done little-to-no research about whether I’m comfortable with all that’s happening behind-the-scenes. Still, you took the time to scroll to the bottom of this article, long after the achievement for a first post was possible, and post a comment that amounts to little more than trolling. There is no opinion here, and we’d all be better off if the discussion, positive or negative, didn’t include pointless derailment.

This isn’t all of you, obviously, and many of you made substantive arguments, even if I disagreed. I suppose the biggest problem I have is with the tone, the dismissiveness, the idea that none of this matters, and that if people only just spoke up at their jobs, engaged with sexual harassment laws (which is hardly the most pervasive issue), changed their attitude, this would just go away. “I have a solution, just grow some fucking balls,” was one comment that stuck out on page 20-something of the comments. There is a reason why it’s not easy to just “grow some fucking balls,” and it’s because of the response these subjects generate, and the seemingly futile nature of having this debate in a public forum. Not to mention that if you’re looking at the current layoff happy climate of the games industry, speaking up about this issue and possibly risking your job if it backfires doesn’t sound like the greatest idea ever.

If you were a woman at a game developer, would you want to speak up after reading that thread, or the countless others that sprouted up yesterday? Twitter is, at least, a place where you can do filtering and hear voices you regard.

“I’ve been watching the #1reasonwhy hashtag on Twitter with an anxious kind of understanding,” said games writer Katie Williams in a blog not long after #1reasonwhy started catching fire. “Like, part of me wants to jump right in and post a dozen of my own experiences, but I’ve also learned what happens if you say that shit publicly: you’re berated, blamed, dismissed. I’ve been there.”

She is not alone, and I don’t blame her for it.

I suspect there's an underlying fear involved in all of this, as well. "What does this mean for the games we love? What if we're okay with how games are made already? Don't ruin them!" Change, while painful, is often healthy, but I'm also realistic. I don't expect drastic change due to market realities--what sells well will continue to sell well, and that includes plenty of dudebro that, hey, I also enjoy playing! You know, even if the Entertainment Software Association does report that 47% of all game players are women. If there's better women representation in development, those people given a bigger voice, it's not going to make the video games you already enjoy go away. But maybe it means video game companies will be more willing to create games for a growing audience who play games because they love games but do not have characters that speak to them. It might not change publishers who release games with women protagonists but don't support them with marketing, but change happens slowly.

Again, it’s weird. I’m a guy, I’ve never had to deal with any of these problems. But I’m willing to admit where there’s smoke, there’s probably fire, and listening is helpful, informative. If you don’t want to listen, you don’t have to. No one is forcing you. Just stop shouting down others who want to.

As with last time, I'll leave you with my own contribution, this time for #1reasontobe.

#1reasontobe Because we need strong female role models, and more of them. It won't solve everything, but it's a start.

— Patrick Klepek (@patrickklepek) November 28, 2012
Staff
Edited by SpaceGandhi

Maybe first?

Nooooo.

Also, sexism is bad. Yeah. Like real bad.

Edited by Vadered

Holding comment for thirty seconds to give questers a shot...

Okay done.

I think we all should keep an open mind about this sort of thing. Another comment from the previous thread said, live as well as you can and try not to be a jerk. That's true, but I like to use these things as ways of examining myself - am I unknowingly being sexist or racist or whateverist in my own encounters and interactions? You don't have to step on eggshells or triple think everything you say lest you offend somebody, but making an effort to understand how you act affects others is never wasted.

Edited by Jumbs

MRAs will once again come out of the woodwork, claim women receive better treatment than men, and thus the cycle continues.

I wish you could install a privilege filter on here.

Posted by xMrSunshine

How about we break 2000 you guys?

Posted by Video_Game_King

I think you mean she penned it, Patrick. Otherwise, I'm just confused, given the context.

Posted by Deusx

#1reasontobe is something I can actually get behind, it's positive and it doesn't generalize men as sexist pigs all over the world. I say good on that.

Posted by patrickklepek

@Video_Game_King said:

I think you mean she penned it, Patrick. Otherwise, I'm just confused, given the context.

You're right, thanks. :)

Staff
Posted by Grimluck343

Here we go again.

Edited by EnduranceFun

Most of the discussion from the comment section ignored. Thanks for the misinformation, because the discussion you perpetuated was 'discouraging.' Yes, yes, sexism bad, Patrick good.

You also posted the same tweet twice...?

To sum up the comment section:

  • Faith is not a memorable character at all and it's insulting the way you talk about her female writer
  • Virtual boobies in Dead or Alive DLC is not equatable to real world problems
  • Secretaries are largely female and gamers are largely male, thus the stereotypes
  • Twitter is not a good sole sample for a 'news story'
  • How about some coverage on social issues in games other than sexism?
Posted by iAmJohn

@Deusx said:

#1reasontobe is something I can actually get behind, it's positive and it doesn't generalize men as sexist pigs all over the world. I say good on that.

If you're busy getting offended by "anti-men" generalizations, you're simply looking for a reason to be offended by the most microscopic bullshit imaginable.

Posted by WilltheMagicAsian

Yes, more sensationalist articles please. That's what I come to GB for.

Posted by Nightriff

Man nothing else must be going on to have another article on the same subject.

Posted by Gordo789

thanks for the followup Patrick. Lots of dudes missed the point completely and tried to derail the discussion by nitpicking tertiary aspects of your previous story, which basically amounts to shouting down or ignoring the complaints that were being voiced.

Posted by ghostNPC

Constantly disappointed in so many users on this site. Most of you people are really that horrible, aren't you? It really makes me sad.

Posted by EricSmith
@patrickklepek: Telling you about simple mistakes makes me feel like an asshole, but...Sixth 'graph, second sentence, "I'm just know..."
 
Once again, sorry for the correction. :/
Posted by alConn

Damn it...

Edited by dr_mantas

@Jumbs said:

MRAs will once again come out of the woodwork, claim women receive better treatment than men, and thus the cycle continues.

I wish you could install a privilege filter on here.

I wish you would stop mentioning Men's Rights Activists and "privilege" when you really don't understand either. And NEITHER is really relevant to the conversation.

Just fucking stop. Let's just support these women in the game development industry. After all, this is about them.

No need to be negative, dismissive and insulting.

Posted by iAmJohn

@dr_mantas said:

@Jumbs said:

MRAs will once again come out of the woodwork, claim women receive better treatment than men, and thus the cycle continues.

I wish you could install a privilege filter on here.

I wish you would stop mentioning Men's Rights Activists and "privilege" when you really don't understand either. And NEITHER are really relevant to the conversation.

Just fucking stop. Let's just support these women in the game development industry. After all, this is about them.

No need to be negative, dismissive and insulting.

Spoken like someone who doesn't understand the history of the Men's Rights movement.

Edited by Maajin

@WilltheMagicAsian said:

Yes, more sensationalist articles please. That's what I come to GB for.

Is not like it's taking away space from what you come for. And it's a valuable discussion to a lot of people, Giant Bomb is not made only for you, shockingly.

Posted by Turambar

If this was a forum thread made by a user, the mods would lock this thread and direct all discussion to the original one, if it wasn't already locked due to the comments getting out of hand.

Posted by Soulreaverm
I do not consider myself a feminist or particularly aligned with the feminist movement.

You don't think women should be treated equally to men? That's really all it means. Every reasonable person is a feminist. It's a shame that certain highly visible minority segments of the movement put people off the word.

Posted by UlquioKani

I feel we as gamers are also to blame for some of the problems that women face in the gaming industry. The way women are talked about in message boards and in game chat make us sound like the worst. Changing our attitudes should improve the way the general public will perceive games and perhaps more women would want to be a part of it.

Posted by Deusx

@iAmJohn said:

@Deusx said:

#1reasontobe is something I can actually get behind, it's positive and it doesn't generalize men as sexist pigs all over the world. I say good on that.

If you're busy getting offended by "anti-men" generalizations, you're simply looking for a reason to be offended by the most microscopic bullshit imaginable.

I don't get offended, I just think it's stupid to fight fire with fire. That's what most of the #1reasonwhy tweets have been about. If you're busy replying to my comments you're simply looking for a reason to be offended by the most microscopic bullshit imaginable ;D. See? haha.

Posted by Grimluck343

@Nightriff said:

Man nothing else must be going on to have another article on the same subject.

Maybe if we troll hard enough we can get featured in a future article like

Posted by dr_mantas

@iAmJohn: I will not discuss it here, because it's not relevant and clogs up the comments. But I do understand both the history and the current goals of the Men's Rights movement. This has nothing to do with Men's Rights, because it's not about women being treated preferentially, it's about them being treated equally.

Now leave it.

Edited by AlKusanagi

The biggest problem I see is that, despite all the money it draws, gamers and the game industry are still seen as the red-headed stepchildren of the entertainment world, and are still looking to be legitimized. Sexism is rampant EVERYWHERE, and if we can't prevent it in more "legit" institutions like the business world, Hollywood, etc. how is this going to amount to anything more than a drop in the bucket. Sadly, the game industry does seem to mainly be a boys' club and an uphill battle for women and minorities, but it should probably be dealt with on the scale of sexism as a whole, and not "sexism in the game industry."

Posted by thealexray

No need to denounce feminism every time you make a statement that's positive towards women, Patrick. Stupid people aren't going to believe you anyway and people who know what feminism is will think you ignorant.

Edited by EnduranceFun

@Soulreaverm: There is a contingent who believe feminism is actually about the supremacy of women over men. Women's rights / equal rights is not specifically feminism and I believe that's what you mean.

Posted by BrockNRolla

Thank you Patrick. Though many shout down those trying to make the world even a slightly more friendly place, it does my heart good to see people with a voice, like yourself and those running this site, taking a positive stand on these issues.

This is the first comment I've posted in many months because I've been so exceedingly frustrated with how cruel and thoughtless people are in these forums. (Of course, it's not just these forums, but just about all forums.) Whether it's anonymity or some other factor, the notion that people are so hateful to those trying to bring awareness to an issue or trying to help others is disgusting. Unfortunately, I see no hope for things getting better any time soon.

Posted by Juliodepatatas

Thank you Patrick for raising awareness to this issue. That it rankles so many MRA's and the like proves that it's starting to sink in with society at large.

Posted by McGhee
Posted by Grimluck343

glad to see you back in this clusterfuck! Ready for round two?

Edited by Sil3n7

Is this really the best place to get on your soap box?

Online
Posted by CornBREDX

Despite some grammar mistakes, (sorry, I couldn't resist, they get real bad near the end) you raise some very valid points. 
 
While I really don't like to partake in this discussion (as it's one that makes everybody get all riled, and those are not fun discussions for me) I have always been for equality in all things. I think there are bigger issues these days, then this, but if women are not being treated equally in any work place they really should stand up for themselves. I would never be against that.  
 
I liked when you said "raising awareness for one issue doesn't invalidate other problems" (I paraphrased for time). That's something I had never considered in general, and something a lot of people need to take to heart. 
 
Basically, not everything is about the generic YOU.  
Well said.

Posted by DrKunze

Sorry ESA but playing Angry Birds does NOT make you a gamer, it makes you a casual.

Posted by HellBound

When you say "here are thier stories" the law and order music pops in my head.

Dun dun.

Posted by dvaeg

I'm pretty ambivalent about the whole concept as it seems in my casual glance to be wholly without context. Are the (admittedly legitimate) feelings of these employees found in greater number vis-a-vis any other industry? I work in healthcare, in a profession dominated by women. Many of my fellow men feel similarly in our field.

The missing context appears to be: is this emblematic of an industry that is disproportionate in its genders, of the workplace in general, or is this common societal issue that is being misappropriated to the games industry?

Posted by Gordo789

@dr_mantas said:

Just fucking stop. Let's just support these women in the game development industry. After all, this is about them.

No need to be negative, dismissive and insulting.

This is good advice for everyone. well said.

Posted by RenMcKormack

I played Mirror's Edge. A bunch. Great ideas really fun gameplay. The main character felt like a cipher to me she could have been a robot for what the game did to her. Im not sure that there was much to market there other than she looked like the old esurance ads at the time.

Posted by Spike_Kojima

Ahh why are you posting this, I dont care about female protags in games I dont care if women say they are being treating badly. I dont care so much that I read this whole story even though I think its not worth talking about and I really need to comment about how commenting on this is lame. La la la Im not listening.

Yep, that's as passive aggressive as I can get. I believe the opposite of that to be clear.

Posted by EvilKatarn
Again, it’s weird. I’m a guy, I’ve never had to deal with any of these problems. But I’m willing to admit where there’s smoke, there’s probably fire, and listening is helpful, informative. If you don’t want to listen, you don’t have to. No one is forcing you. Just stop shouting down others who want to.

I've argued about this topic with friends and we've all agreed that there's both merit and fault in this whole thing happening over Twitter. I even had an elongated argument on Twitter with Zynga's community manager who managed to utter out the words that me being against this Twitter thing shoved in my face does not make me sexist scum. I have a different way of fighting this and believe that this Twitter thing will change nothing.

So Patrick, in the bombcast I hope I won't have to hear about this. At all. None.

Giant Bomb is a website. About videogames. I subscribed because of the fun-loving nature of the crew.

There are surely other places you could write about this stuff, ones where people wouldn't lash out at you so easily.

Posted by misquared

@AlKusanagi said:

The biggest problem I see is that, despite all the money it draws, gamers and the game industry are still seen as the red-headed stepchildren of the entertainment world, and are still looking to be legitimized. Sexism is rampant EVERYWHERE, and if we can't prevent it in more "legit" institutions like the business world, Hollywood, etc. how is this going to amount to anything more than a drop in the bucket. Sadly, the game industry does seem to mainly be a boys' club and an uphill battle for women and minorities, but it should probably be dealt with on the scale of sexism as a whole, and not "sexism in the game industry."

I see where you're coming from, but I don't quite buy this argument. Saying that "well, it's something that's so deeply integrated into our mainstream culture. because of that we shouldn't even try" rings hollow. Yes, fighting against sexist portrayals in video games is an uphill battle, but does that mean it's not worth fighting?

Posted by hollitz

Social changes happen agonizingly slow, but I really do think that the discussions are worth having if just one person has their views challenged.

I think arts are at the forefront of social change. If you want gamers to stop being immature sexist fuckwads, you have to start presenting female characters who aren't just in the games as love interests for some main male character. There have been some attempts at this like Faith from Mirror's Edge or Samus or Chell, but these characters are so poorly fleshed out that I'm not even sure they count. Alex Vance is a fine character, but I think she's problematic as she's basically just there to be your cyber-girlfriend.

We'll get there eventually, I'm sure of it. The process is just glacial which can be really upsetting at times.

Posted by dr_mantas

For all you holier-than-thou types in these comments, why do you feel that insulting people, making gross generalizations and throwing buzzwords around helps your point get across better? Making fun of MRAs and calling everyone that has any issue with what you say sexist just seems childish and inappropriate.

Posted by MjHealy

I completely agree with the sentiment behind #1reasonwhy. Both the low-level of (not uber-sexified) women protagonists and women being not placed on the same level as men in this industry is appalling. But, c'mon guys, "grow some fucking balls" is the literally the dumbest thing you can say. You may disagree with Patrick's somewhat preachy tone (I agree with him all the way so no biggie) but placing your opinions in such smutty comments is just stupid. The anecdote about the female secretary mix-up seems like an issue in an episode of Mad Men - backward stuff.

Edited by EnduranceFun

@Grimluck343: Nice to see you too. Hell yeah!

Posted by anarchyzombie9

@Sil3n7: is this really the best place to complain about somebody talking about why equality is needed in the video game industry?

Posted by kahjah

It's good to see that people are speaking up about this in positive ways. I wonder though if this were about POC (people of color) in the gaming industry if it would have gotten this kind of traction?

Posted by HellBound
@Kaiserreich
Idiots need to be called out.

Maybe they will think twice before spewing ignorance.