#1 Edited by LucidDreams117 (375 posts) -

Hey there. Just in the midst of watching the Crysis 3 Quick Look. Brad changes the graphics settings and turns off anti-aliasing. I've heard the term several times before, Googled it, but have never really come up with an easy explanation. I know some terminology when it comes to graphics but this one has thrown me. In the easiest way, what is anti-aliasing?

Please and Thanks :)

#2 Edited by Garfield518 (403 posts) -

It smooths out the jaggies on the edge of objects.

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#3 Posted by Korwin (2813 posts) -

It smooths out the jaggies on the edge of objects.

Pretty much yep. It makes your image look cleaner around the edges of objects and other elements. There are a few different methods for performing it, some better looking and more costly than others (the TXAA they had enabled in the quick look is a very new technology that looks great, but devours your framerate).

#4 Posted by itspizza (427 posts) -

I have a different question from said quick look, what is v-sync? I usually leave it disabled.

#5 Posted by iceman228433 (572 posts) -

v-sync makes it so you don't get screen tear you want that on at all times.

#6 Edited by hiono (48 posts) -

i actually rarely use v-sync screen tearing isnt as big of a problem some people make it out to be

#7 Posted by Subjugation (4714 posts) -

I have a different question from said quick look, what is v-sync? I usually leave it disabled.

V-sync stands for vertical sync, and it locks your frame rate to the refresh rate of your monitor so you don't get that jarring screen tearing.

#8 Posted by LucidDreams117 (375 posts) -

Wow. So simple with that image. Thanks guys! Appreciate it. I was actually thinking about that v-sync is as well. Thanks again. :) so here's another question. One of the most prominent things I notice while playing games on the consoles(which is where I play pretty much all my games, thus the reason for my lack of graphics knowledge), is that the shadows of characters and objects, whether in game or cut scene have jagged lines. None are smooth and straight or round. Some games are better at it than others. It's ugly as sin and very distracting. Hope it's something that'll go away with the next generation. So is this also a part of anti-aliasing?

#9 Posted by TheHT (10789 posts) -

It makes things look less jaggy and more smooth.

#10 Posted by ll_Exile_ll (1404 posts) -

Wow. So simple with that image. Thanks guys! Appreciate it. I was actually thinking about that v-sync is as well. Thanks again. :) so here's another question. One of the most prominent things I notice while playing games on the consoles(which is where I play pretty much all my games, thus the reason for my lack of graphics knowledge), is that the shadows of characters and objects, whether in game or cut scene have jagged lines. None are smooth and straight or round. Some games are better at it than others. It's ugly as sin and very distracting. Hope it's something that'll go away with the next generation. So is this also a part of anti-aliasing?

The more detailed the shadows, the more resources are used. Shadow quality is usually a separate graphics option on PC games, but it's safe to say that shadow quality is usually not a priority in optimizing console games (much like v-sync and anti-aliasing).

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#11 Posted by GERALTITUDE (2855 posts) -

@luciddreams117: Yep. Console games tend not to render super amazing shadows to save on performance.

For most PC games this a toggle you control based on your machine.

#12 Edited by captain_clayman (3318 posts) -

@luciddreams117 said:

Wow. So simple with that image. Thanks guys! Appreciate it. I was actually thinking about that v-sync is as well. Thanks again. :) so here's another question. One of the most prominent things I notice while playing games on the consoles(which is where I play pretty much all my games, thus the reason for my lack of graphics knowledge), is that the shadows of characters and objects, whether in game or cut scene have jagged lines. None are smooth and straight or round. Some games are better at it than others. It's ugly as sin and very distracting. Hope it's something that'll go away with the next generation. So is this also a part of anti-aliasing?

Shadows that are chunky are just low-resolution. AA might help a bit, but it's best if the game's engine is able to render higher quality shadows of objects. Most console games have to sacrifice nice shadows because every time something in the game moves, its shadow has to be recalculated, and the more complex a shadow is, the more work the system has to do to render it.

And I agree, it's pure ugly. I think that will definitely go away next gen, at least for the majority of games.

#13 Edited by LucidDreams117 (375 posts) -

Ahh alright. Thank you to everyone. Feel more knowledgeable already! And as we know, knowledge is power

Seriously though, thanks guys. Long time questions I've had, glad I finally got the answers. :)

#14 Edited by egg (1452 posts) -

AA = making it harder to distinguish pixels, using smoke and mirrors xD

Well, that's the definition of AA according to the eggtionary.

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