#1 Posted by Seppli (11233 posts) -

In Django Unchained the actor James Remar plays two characters (Ace Speck and Butch Pooch). The first of which gets shot in the first couple of minutes of the movie. This is not the first incident of such startling a casting decision I've seen in a modern Western-themed piece of entertainment. I observed this oddity in Deadwood as well, where-in Garret Dillahunt plays two different characters (Jack McCall and Francis Wolcott - the first of which gets shot at the end of season one, the second role pops up right after, at the beginning of season 2).

I find it hard to believe that these wierd instances of *double casting* the same actor for two roles in the same piece are anything but willfully intended. Especially when an über-referential pop culture nerd like Quentin Tarantino does it. The question remains... why?

Anybody got a clue?

#2 Posted by Hailinel (25787 posts) -

There are a variety of reasons for it, but it's nothing too unusual. Peter Sellers played, as I recall, three separate roles in Dr. Strangelove, all of whom are completely different characters. It's easy to buy Sellers in three roles because he was both an incredibly gifted actor and a talented costume and makeup team were adept at disguising him.

Then there's the Austin Power series, where Mike Myers played Austin, Dr. Evil, Fat Bastard, and Goldmember. Mostly because it's his film franchise and these characters were all written to what types Myers is capable of playing.

#3 Posted by Benny (2001 posts) -

@seppli: It's indeed a Tarantino thing to do and most likely a reference to the kinds of movies you mentioned. Your initial spoiler block does nothing to hide the spoiler though XD.

#4 Edited by Seppli (11233 posts) -

@hailinel said:

There are a variety of reasons for it, but it's nothing too unusual. Peter Sellers played, as I recall, three separate roles in Dr. Strangelove, all of whom are completely different characters. It's easy to buy Sellers in three roles because he was both an incredibly gifted actor and a talented costume and makeup team were adept at disguising him.

Then there's the Austin Power series, where Mike Myers played Austin, Dr. Evil, Fat Bastard, and Goldmember. Mostly because it's his film franchise and these characters were all written to what types Myers is capable of playing.

Of course I'm aware of the aforementioned precendents in absurdist entertainment. However, these precendents don't account for such a thing to occur in a Western. As far as Western references go, neither of those movies are Westerns. It has to be Western-specific. I doubt Quentin Tarantino does such a thing on a whim, it simply has to be in tribute to some obscure movie or circumstance of early film works.

#5 Posted by Ravenlight (8057 posts) -

@seppli said:

I doubt Quentin Tarantino does such a thing on a whim

Really? I would have guessed it was just that.

#6 Posted by Hailinel (25787 posts) -

@seppli said:

I doubt Quentin Tarantino does such a thing on a whim

Really? I would have guessed it was just that.

Yeah, as meticulous as Tarantino is in picking out references to throw into a blender, his decision to cast an actor in two different roles isn't necessarily a reference to anything.

#7 Edited by probablytuna (4156 posts) -

Tarantino did cast Gordon Liu in two roles in Kill Bill, one as the head of the Crazy 88s in the first volume and then as Pai Mei in the second. It's not technically a western, so maybe it's not a western-specific thing?

#8 Edited by ItBeStefYo (1096 posts) -
Oh hell yes