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CD Projekt RED Waves Goodbye to DRM

The developer behind The Witcher has been a poster child for the industry's struggle with piracy. These days, the path is clear.

DRM has become a dirty word. Don’t dare speak it, lest you uncork the Internet's wrath.

Digital rights management was invented for a single reason: control. It was conceived to combat piracy, but even with the best of intentions, it often punishes legitimate customers. And depending on who you talk to, piracy is either a huge problem or a reality of development creators should just embrace.

It’s not hard to imagine why a developer might be upset. These companies work for years on a game, and many, many people pour their heart, soul, and money into a project. Then, someone clicks on a torrent, and gains access to all of that by waiting for a download bar to fill up.

CD Projekt RED has tried it both ways. Both The Witcher and The Witcher 2 had DRM, though the latter ditched it. The former was due to an agreement with Atari. With The Witcher 2, we saw CD Projekt RED dragged into a very public fight about its beliefs on the matter. The version of The Witcher 2 with DRM was found to run substantially slower on people’s computers, and it was stripped out in a patch.

For a time, the developer was actually tracking people who downloaded the game through a torrent, and hit them with legal papers. This didn't go over well. In an interview with PC Gamer from late 2011, the developer estimated The Witcher 2 has been illegally downloaded more than 4.5 million times. That number can only have grown since. CD Projekt RED later dropped the practice of tracking pirates.

“We’ve heard your concerns, listened to your voices, and we’re responding to them,” said co-founder Marcin Iwinski in an open letter to fans in December 2012. “But you need to help us and do your part: don’t be indifferent to piracy. If you see a friend playing an illegal copy of a game--any game--tell your friend that they’re undermining the possible success of the developer who created the very game that they are enjoying. Unless you support the developers who make the games you play, unless you pay for those games, we won’t be able to produce new excellent titles for you.”

Iwinski is singing a slightly different tune about piracy these days. CD Projekt RED announced last week that The Witcher 3 would not feature any form of DRM--period. (Excluding Steam) One assumes that means it’s not going to be tracking pirates, either.

To learn a little more about how CD Projekt RED arrived at this decision, I sent some questions to Iwinski over email. Read on for our full conversation below. It’s a good one.

Giant Bomb: Can you talk about why CD Projekt RED chose to use DRM in the past? Ideally, what did you hope to achieve?

Marcin Iwinski: With The Witcher 1 it was not our choice, as it was a development deal and we had Atari as a publisher. That said, I should admit that at that time we just followed the ‘industry standard’ and did not consider DRM-free to be a cause worth dying for. We already had our opinion about it, but contractually we did not have a say. When the game was released we even held some hope that the DRM would help sales and wouldn’t be cracked for some time, but events proved us wrong: as with every DRMed game, it was cracked in no time.

It occurred to us that twisted logic governs this issue. We pay for a type of protection that requires users to go through a series of authenticating measures, then it fails to work, while the pirated version is actually more user-friendly, easier for gamers to deal with. As it turns out, we were quite naïve to agree to DRM in the first place, I have to say, but ultimately it is the mistakes we make that provide the most valuable lessons...

GB: Steam is a form of DRM, but consumers are okay with that. Why do you think that is?

Iwinski: It’s easy to use and it works--and those are usually the greatest weaknesses of any DRM system. It definitely makes a huge difference that Valve is a gamer-centric company--they really care about gamers, which is a rarity.Still, I believe more freedom should come with the content you buy. I would feel much safer if I could download all my games and play them off-line without running a client application first, without accessing the Internet. What if the servers go down? What if for some unforeseen legal reasons some content has to be removed from the cloud? Do I really own it, like I own discs I buy in the store, or not? These were actually among the main reasons why we started GOG.com.

GB: Was there ever a scenario where The Witcher 3 would have DRM? You know, much earlier in development?

Iwinski: We learned a lot from The Witcher 1 being DRMed and then The Witcher 2 being partly DRMed. For The Witcher 2 there was a DRM-free version on GOG.com on day one. Then, approximately two weeks after the launch, we released a patch that removed the DRM from the retail version, but still we had a co-publishing agreement and were contractually obliged to put a protection on the game, as per our publishing partner’s requirement. This was already a big step in the right direction compared to The Witcher 1, as we were able to release The Witcher 2 DRM-free digitally on GOG.com.

Now, you would expect the version available on pirate sites to be the GOG.com one--pretty much a no-brainer--as that version was not protected in any way whatsoever. Funny enough, pirates took the DRMed retail version and cracked it the day the game was released. It would be kind of hard to put the usual cracking group credits along the lines of “cracked by xxx” on a DRM-free version, wouldn’t it?

In the run-up to The Witcher 3, making it DRM-free was a key part of our plan from the beginning. We made sure to have this in the contract. Besides, people are beginning to see that going DRM-free does not cause any harm--in fact, it strengthens the bond with gamers. All the DRM-free releases on GOG.com proved this, so we did not actually face much resistance with TW3.

It seems to me that the industry as a whole knows DRM doesn’t work, but corporations still use it as a smokescreen, effectively covering their asses, pretending to protect their intellectual property in front of bosses, investors, and shareholders. I’ve actually had quite a few discussions with high level executives who admit they know DRM doesn’t work, but if they don’t use it somebody might accuse them of not protecting their property. Whenever policy trumps common sense, the best interest of gamers is lost in the process.

GB: DRM has become a dirty word. How do you think we’ve arrived at this point? Could it have gone differently?

Iwinski: Piracy has been there from the beginning. It started with the tapes containing games that friends would give to each other to copy (I still remember the protection systems modulating the recordings on magnetic tape, making them harder to copy for my first gaming machine--the ZX Spectrum), then floppy discs, CD-ROMs, DVD-ROMs and now we have the digital age. Could it have gone differently? I don’t think so, but we can change it now, so why not do it? When it’s easy to copy something and have it for free, a lot of people are tempted, and many ultimately go for it. Are they all stealing? Are they all thieves? Why do they do it? Was the game legally and easily available in their country? What was the price in relation to their average income? Did they even launch the game they just pirated, or did they grab it because they could? These are all vital questions and nobody’s asking them.

As an industry, our role is to educate the consumer and, simultaneously, to create a myriad of easy, extremely user-friendly and legal ways to buy content. “User-friendly" That’s the key, and it means no restrictions, no obstacles whatsoever.

Digital distribution is definitely a game changer. We can reach out to gamers directly, make content available worldwide at a moment’s notice, put games on sale ad hoc and generally dismantle the barriers that have traditionally existed between gamers and content. It’s a good direction and we should stay the course, but all that is just the beginning.

People will continue to choose the easier way as long as obstacles such as time-consuming registration and invasive authentication measures remain in place. They also prefer piracy to clumsy and hard to navigate digital platforms and regional restrictions. They might think, “I’m from country X, so I’m not allowed to buy half of the games on platform Y. Why is that?” As a consumer, I don’t care what the reasons are--if I can’t buy them, I look for an alternative source. Piracy’s biggest advantage is that it’s easy--you just type the name of the game, click on the link and it’s yours. No restrictions, nothing--just you and the game. Let’s remove all the obstacles to buying a legal copy: make it just as easy as piracy, and I’m sure gamers will come on board. That’s what we aim for with GOG.com. And we’ve already managed to prove it works with The Witcher 2.

GB: The argument from consumers is that DRM hurts the paying players. How much of that drives this decision for Witcher 3?

Iwinski: This was a key motive behind our decision. We want legit gamers to feel they own the game and can play it when they want to, how they want to. Why on earth should pirates have a better user experience than gamers who paid their hard earned money for our game? I sincerely think it should be the other way around: gamers acquiring legal copies should get a significantly better experience and deal than do pirates. While we can’t stop piracy, we can work on offering premium deals to those who buy our game and that’s what we plan to do with TW3. I strongly believe in using the carrot not the stick, so yes, we’re working to create some impressive carrots.

GB: In order to be a modern PC game in a world where players don’t want DRM, does that mean simply accepting piracy as part of business?

Iwinski: We shouldn’t accept it--that’s not the way to go. We should be active in convincing gamers to get a legal version, but the industry is moving in exactly the opposite direction by using DRM. Like I said: the carrot, not the stick. I would encourage content creators to strive to understand pirates, welcome them with open arms, embrace their motives, and then show them the advantages of buying a legal version of their game simply by making it worth their while--be it through free updates, additional free content when you register on their site, leaderboards, being a part of a meaningful community and, last but not least, not using DRM. And why no DRM? Because it just doesn’t work, and frequently does the opposite of what it was intended to do--it doesn’t stop any pirates, and instead acts as an obstacle to gamers who acquire their content legally.

"Will it [Witcher 3] be more pirated than if we put DRM on it? I definitely don’t think so. With a DRM-free release, we’re hoping to build more trust between us and gamers."

GB: No DRM means The Witcher 3 will be pirated. So how does CD Projekt RED intend to stop that from getting out of control?

Iwinski: No DRM means that The Witcher 3 will be easier to install and use the way gamers want to use it, whenever they want to use it. They will be free to back it up and as the files will have no protection, gamers will have a sense of true ownership.

Will it be more pirated than if we put DRM on it? I definitely don’t think so. Practically every single game’s DRM is cracked on day 0 (or even before then), so that’s not really an argument for using it. With a DRM-free release, we’re hoping to build more trust between us and gamers. This already worked with GOG.com’s DRM-free release of The Witcher 2 and we would like to take it to the next level with a DRM-free worldwide release of The Witcher 3 that will not only apply to the GOG.com version, but to boxed copies of the game as well.

GB: As media goes increasingly more digital, content holders will want more control. How do you see that tension playing out in the next 10 years?

Iwinski: Try to impose too much control, create artificial obstacles to people buying, accessing and using your content, and people will always look for easier alternatives. We all know that DRM of any sort will eventually be cracked. Content creators and platform holders should focus on making it as easy and convenient as possible for gamers to buy and play their games. Pirating will make much less sense when it’s easier to buy a game legally than it is to pirate it. Unfortunately, far too often in our industry it’s the other way around.

Patrick Klepek on Google+
136 Comments
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Edited by markmack

<3 The Witcher

But man, I remember The Witcher 2 running like crap on my computer when it was first released.

Edited by AlexGBRO

great studio and great games

Posted by zenmastah

These guys fucking get it.

Now to get the other guys onboard too.

Posted by Hassun

I wish CD Project Red all the best. From the Witcher, to GoG, to Cyberpunk, these guys are doing fantastic work.

Posted by CannedBread

If I hadn't already bought both the Witcher games on a steam sale, this company's attitude would have driven me to buy them.

Now I just need to get around to playing them...

Posted by andymacsa4

Fantastic article, Patrick. I agree with the idea that we should use the carrot, not the stick to convince gamers to purchase legitimate copies of titles. GOG has been amazing in this respect, offering extra content similar to what would be found in a limited edition (Soundtracks, Art Stills, etc.) while also being DRM-free. Hopefully, more executives will realize that DRM is wholly ineffective and often prevents potential sales due to the hassle of using an un-optimized, broken client (GFWL, I'm looking at you!).

Posted by charlie_victor_bravo

I bought the Witcher one. I bought the Witcher 2 twice (xbox360 and PC). I am not going to buy the 3rd game 3 times, but I will definitely pay for it.

Edited by bhhawks78

As someone who tried and did not enjoy Witcher 1-2, their stance on DRM will likely at least give witcher 3 a shot because companies like this deserve my gaming bucks.

Also it doesn't matter if it is pirated more, it matters if it sells more/less.

For a company like this

3 million in sales, 10 million pirated copies is far superior to 1 million in sales and 1 million in pirated copies.

Edited by umbaglo

This article reminded me of something I'd really like to see statistics on. For all the complaining corporations make about the costs of piracy, I'd like to know what percentages of the "losses" they're claiming are coming from locations or countries that they're not selling the product in.

If you're not going to bother selling your game in, say, Poland, and then it turns out that everyone in Poland pirates your game, but hardly anyone outside did, did you really suffer losses? Can you really blame pirates for these losses if so?

Posted by MasterRain

If you ONLY release a steam version, that requires steam saying 'OK' to run, isn't that un-piratable? I guess they'd crack it and fake the steam authentication? I just hate that you have to give in to pirates, feels like we lost.

Posted by Soviet666

About millions times they said that they won't use DRM in Witcher 3 but somehow it's still newsworthy.

Posted by darkdragonmage99

a company making the same argument i've been making for years and people called me crazy.

Posted by NekuSakuraba

Great article Patrick.

It's great to hear CD Projekt REDs stance on this, I finished the first Witcher only recently and am about to start reading the books. Really big kudos to them for doing this, I wish them the best of luck.

Posted by ArtisanBreads

@hassun said:

I wish CD Project Red all the best. From the Witcher, to GoG, to Cyberpunk, these guys are doing fantastic work.

Yep.

At the same time, personally I don't look down on anyone who still tried to have DRM or anything. I guess at this point you are kind of foolish (the crack, like he says, comes in day 1 or 0 even) but seeing your stuff stolen like that would be awful.

This is pretty much the inevitability though. More than anything, these guys just make great games so I'm on board.

Posted by Quackers

Great interview. Make great games with minimal invasiveness.

The Witcher franchise is one of the best. I'll happily pick up the third installment and whatever these guys create.

Posted by crusader8463

These guys seem to always be saying smart stuff like this that I wish more companies would listen to and realize. Sadly I'm just not a fan of their games, but I wish more people thought like they did. Makes me want to buy their stuff just to support the ideas they are preaching.

Edited by NicksCorner

I did not know that CD Project RED was running GOG, that's just another feather in their hat.

They are steadily working and improving to rival Stardock as my favourite developer/publisher.

Posted by heatDrive88

If you ONLY release a steam version, that requires steam saying 'OK' to run, isn't that un-piratable? I guess they'd crack it and fake the steam authentication? I just hate that you have to give in to pirates, feels like we lost.

I get where you're coming from, but making your game harder to buy because it only exists in one sales channel to the public for legitimate sales is going to negatively impact your bottom-line sales revenue significantly.

Sure, people are going to be pirating your game, but then you're neglecting sales to people who want to buy your game through means other than Steam.

Posted by heatDrive88
Posted by umbaglo

If you ONLY release a steam version, that requires steam saying 'OK' to run, isn't that un-piratable? I guess they'd crack it and fake the steam authentication? I just hate that you have to give in to pirates, feels like we lost.

Steam's DRM has been long since cracked. It's never been a strong system. But that also wasn't the point. Steam hasn't been effective at fighting piracy because of DRM; it's because it's low-overhead (it's pretty much "Is Steam running y/n"), it's convenient (the ease of managing, organizing, updating, and purchasing is pretty much only matched by mobile OSes, and even then in some ways Steam is better), and it's affordable (very little beats Steam sales). Everything that CD Projekt has been making a case for.

If you make acquiring a legit copy a convenient and hassle-free experience, you're going to get people who will want it over finding a cracked version. You're never going to convince people who insist only on piracy, but they're not the ones you're concerned about. The people who want your product, but find legit ways to get it cumbersome, inconvenient, or just plain non-existent are the ones you're concerned with. And giving them the best experience is what you, as a company, should be focused on.

Posted by CoinMatze

I wish them all the best and I will forever buy their games on day 1 but I don't think this issue is solved by simply getting rid of DRM because it supposedly doesn't work. I can only speak for myself. I stopped pirating games because of DRM. When I had to regularly install data from cracking groups three layers deep into my registry to play a game for free, things got too far. Everyone has to decide for themselves how much a game is worth to them and how much hassle they are willing to take. I don't want to imagine what happens when you take the work to make a game run completely out of that equation. Random thoughts going through my head right now:

If every game was DRM-free, CDPR would lose out on the publicity. How many people are buying their games just to support their cause without having any interest in their games?

The Witcher series sold more than 5 million copies. Do they count copies of The Witcher 1 that were given away for free? How many of those are from The Witcher 2? How many of those are the console or Steam versions vs. GOG.com? The games are so good, why isn't that number higher? In 2011 the reported pirated copies of The Witcher 2 were just under 5 million, likely mucher higher now. And those were probably just torrenters. I don't think you can track file hosters, which were more popular 2 years ago.

Posted by development

Brilliant responses from Iwinski all-around. It's so nice to hear someone speak intelligently about how fucked up DRM is. We're lucky these guys are talented enough that they've managed to escape the red-tape of big publishers.

Go on The Pirate Bay after any game's launch. It'll take a week max for a hack to be put out. Usually it's less than half a day. Sim City was cracked right around the time the developers were saying it was impossible to take it offline. A large team of highly-skilled developers is still no match for millions of consumers, and never will be. The act of hacking software is merely like picking a really difficult lock in a video game -- it takes time, but by necessity there's always a way. It's like trying to invent a true "random" number: the idea is nice, but it's a logical impossibility. As developers, people need to realize how useless DRM is, because they're only hurting their paying customers.

That said, I think Iwinski is on to something when he says:

It seems to me that the industry as a whole knows DRM doesn’t work, but corporations still use it as a smokescreen, effectively covering their asses, pretending to protect their intellectual property in front of bosses, investors, and shareholders. I’ve actually had quite a few discussions with high level executives who admit they know DRM doesn’t work, but if they don’t use it somebody might accuse them of not protecting their property.

The hilarious irony is that the publishers implementing DRM don't actually care about their consumers at all. No surprise to anyone ever, but still hilarious. I guess the only battle to be fought here is to make sure independent developers don't get brainwashed by the nonsense logic of the publishers.

Posted by mak_wikus

You chose a good date to release the article, Patrick :)

Posted by saadishsnake

CD Projekt hits the nail on the head -- DRM doesn't work and is bothersome for those who BOUGHT the game. It's better to get rid of it and make life easier for real fans of the product.

Edited by Grixxel

If you ONLY release a steam version, that requires steam saying 'OK' to run, isn't that un-piratable? I guess they'd crack it and fake the steam authentication? I just hate that you have to give in to pirates, feels like we lost.

Eh, it's not really giving in to the pirates. It's more like accepting that they will always be around and get around any sort of DRM you can think of, so why lessen the experience of the people that do care and want to support your games/company? I know what you mean though, it's shitty.

Edited by spiralsin

Excellent interview, Patrick. Mr. Iwinski's viewpoints are a great example of why DRM is a flawed concept. It just doesn't work and often punishes the legit consumer more than the pirate. It's one of the reasons I support CD Projekt Red every chance I can.

I supported them directly by buying The Witcher 2 on GOG.com day one and they do make it worthwhile with all the extras. I think they even threw in a free copy of The Witcher 1 if I remember correctly (I already owned the retail version, but I welcomed having a DRM-free copy to play). More game companies should follow their example. Sadly, many of those companies are so stuck in their tired, outdated practices that it may not happen for some time.

Edited by MildMolasses

Hey girl, I'm all about using the carrot and not the stick. Know what I'm sayin'?

Posted by tourgen

About millions times they said that they won't use DRM in Witcher 3 but somehow it's still newsworthy.

common sense and pragmatism IS newsworthy these days.

Posted by Karkarov

Yo... I don't mind giving you guys add revenue I really don't. But if you don't take the stupid ass adds with actual audio off the site that prevent me from reading a article and enjoying it I am going to start using an add blocker here too and you aren't going to get shit.

That said once I could read the article in peace it was a good read.

Edited by armaan8014

<3 these guys

i mean, they thank us for buying their games? So amazing

Imagine working in that company! Watching this video brings tears to my eyes ;_:

Seriously, I might just move to Poland someday.

Posted by batman1105

@karkarov: This is so true. I am now using ad blocker on this site.

Edited by bybeach

I skimmed through this article, and I will re-read again. I don't know. Ppl. pirate because they want something for nothing, with little significant risk. In the main. FUCK them. But on the internet those are joke words, and it will happen anyways. I am glad that the Steam approach somehow mitigates some of this.

And yes, for the ppl. who decide to pirate pirmarily because they are broke, Steam does eventually offer a solution through it's sales. And it's service for the parties is commendable. Too bad it is based necessarily on a self interest model, but Steam would not exist otherwise. In other words, circumstances in the future might make it somehow a monster, also.

Edited by inappropriate_touchscreen

"Was the game legally and easily available in their country? What was the price in relation to their average income? Did they even launch the game they just pirated, or did they grab it because they could? These are all vital questions and nobody’s asking them."

Indeed. I live in Malaysia where the average annual income is around USD8,000, and the price of a boxed retail copy of a video game makes me feel like I'm buying a luxury item. I am sorry to say I have pirated hundreds of video games in these past few years.

But thanks to GOG.com and primarily Steam sales, I have completely stopped downloading illegal copies of games. I now have nearly 200+ games in my Steam library. I don't even buy games on day one anymore, as I have so many Steam games that I haven't finished yet, and so I don't mind waiting for a price drop or the next sale.

Edited by Duncecap

I think steam has added a little bit of fear to cracking and pirating games, especially when they're games closely linked with steam for matchmaking, etc.

I have over 100 games on steam and the risk of my account being suspended or banned for pirating games is enough for me to have stopped completely. It is probably a totally unfounded fear, as I have no idea what the steam policy is for violations like that but I doubt I'm the only one.

On the plus side steam sales now allow me to buy the games I used to pirate for prices I find acceptable during their big sales, so it's win/win.

Posted by Poppduder

@karkarov: or you could just become a premium member instead of issuing vague threats about using adblock. And really, having the adblock conversation in an article about DRM is just too much for me this morning.

Posted by leem101

hmm guess that explains why the Witcher 2 ran like crap on my pc when it came out yet I can run recently released games on high settings.

Also been about 10+ years since I pirated a game, steam has made it so that why would I bother.

Edited by AMyggen

@karkarov: Jeff has said many times that he's against those kinds of ads, so if you PM him/Message him on twitter, he'll probably get it removed. The GB guys doesn't get to approve the ads before they go on the site, but they can get them removed after the fact.

Anyways, not very classy to threaten With using adblock.

Posted by namesonkel

Nice to hear that it isn't just a marketing ploy, that they've put thought into it and are genuine about it.

Posted by csl316

Yep, that was a good one. Always nice when a person against conventional thinking can present their ideas clearly and logically.

Edited by Arx724

@coinmatze said:

I stopped pirating games because of DRM.

Games downloaded from private (and some semi-private) trackers are often less of a hassle than a game with DRM. 5 seconds to unzip or copy-paste a crack compared to (for some) creating an account, having to log in each time, dealing with automatic updates that can break the game and whatnot else. I bought the GOG version of The Witcher 2 day one (I think even before release) because I could just download an executable and a few packaged files and have it extract.

Posted by Karkarov

@amyggen: I agree it isn't classy. Then again neither is having to mouse over a video 8-10 times to get the audio about a guys shirt stains to stop playing.

@poppduder:It is really ironic isn't it. Good thing I love irony.

Edited by dr_mantas

I love it, and I'm all for it.

Still doesn't excuse fucking assholes who pirate games, either by small indie devs who are struggling to get by, or by big companies who still have people working for them.

The only excuse for piracy is trying something to see if it will run on their PC. I have a pretty old one and sometimes games run like crap.

EDIT: Of course, a demo could do that. Not enough demos these days.

Edited by chose

People who complain about piracy are sad people. If you don't want people copying your digital information, stop selling digital information. If there was a machine that could replicate any car aesthetically and mechanically, everyone would build themselves a Ferrari and no one would have a problem with it because you'd still have to buy all of the materials, but copying digital information is free and that's somehow a problem. The beauty with ideas (information) is, you can claim ownership as much as you want, but once it's out there, I can do whatever the fuck I want with it.

If you want to control your work, you'll have to actually control your work and force people to play your game at "game theaters", but once you sell your service remotely to multiple people simultaneously for an easy buck, don't pretend your greed is anything less than my greed. And by way, between pirates and CD Projekt RED, who is making money out of other people's [previous] work? You iterate, I pirate, deal with it.

Posted by Sammo21

@chose: I love hearing people justify blatant theft and then in turn blaming someone else for them doing it.

Edited by AMyggen

@chose: That's up there with the dumbest things I've read all year, especially that second paragraph.

Posted by patrickklepek

@chose said:

People who complain about piracy are sad people. If you don't want people copying your digital information, stop selling digital information. If there was a machine that could replicate any car aesthetically and mechanically, everyone would build themselves a Ferrari and no one would have a problem with it because you'd still have to buy all of the materials, but copying digital information is free and that's somehow a problem. The beauty with ideas (information) is, you can claim ownership as much as you want, but once it's out there, I can do whatever the fuck I want with it.

If you want to control your work, you'll have to actually control your work and force people to play your game at "game theaters", but once you sell your service remotely to multiple people simultaneously for an easy buck, don't pretend your greed is anything less than my greed. And by way, between pirates and CD Projekt RED, who is making money out of other people's [previous] work? You iterate, I pirate, deal with it.

Staff
Posted by ColumnBreaker

@chose: There are some relatively decent pro-piracy arguments. This is not one of them. You damage your cause, sir.

Posted by SlashDance

Now, you would expect the version available on pirate sites to be the GOG.com one--pretty much a no-brainer--as that version was not protected in any way whatsoever. Funny enough, pirates took the DRMed retail version and cracked it the day the game was released.

This is the main reason why I hate DRM. What's the fucking point??? Every single game gets cracked the first week it comes out, more often than not the first day. The shit we had to put up with on PC in the last few years, with GFWL and Uplay, with servers going offline when you want to activate your games, with always online games ; none of that shit was ever a problem if you pirate games. In a lot of cases the best version of a game is the one you can get for free.

Piracy is obviously a problem, but I am amazed that publisher still think DRM is the answer.

Posted by Pr1mus


What this "Chose" guy said can't be for real. This is too far gone to have come out of a human being with a functional brain.

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