Finished in '11

My goal is to reach 60.

List items

  • PS2

    [3/5]

  • PS2

    - Surprisingly holds up well.

    [3/5]

  • PC

    - I didn't leave the computer for a whole afternoon. Yeah, this game is great.

    [5/5]

  • 360

    [5/5]

  • 360

    - Would this game would've been as good if I had played it on day one or, like I did, waited until almost all the DLC was up and on sale? Probably not. Shadow Broker made this game exceptional.

    [5/5]

  • PS2

    - When I don't want to think, I play a Lego game. Thankfully, that doesn't happen often.

    [2/5]

  • 360

    [4/5]

  • 360

    - Those memory masks probably weren't a good thing.

    [3/5]

  • NDS

    [4/5]

  • 360

    - Why did it take me so long to play this? Holy hell, this is great.

    [5/5]

  • 360

    - So this Grubbins on Ice DLC. It's... there. It's... enjoyable. It really shouldn't exist, yet it is still adorable.

    [3/5]

  • 360

    - Meh.

    [3/5]

  • 360

    - Double meh. (And what was the deal with those tiny adults character models pretending to be children?)

    [1/5]

  • PC

    - Had a surprisingly good time.

    [3/5]

  • PC

    - No redeeming qualities whatsoever. I had more fun with Homefront.

    [1/5]

  • PC

    - I'M FLYING.

    [5/5]

  • 360

    [4/5]

  • 360

    [3/5]

  • PS2

    - Why do I punish myself with mediocre platformers? Because I have a problem.

    [2/5]

  • WII

    - Delightful and chill.

    [3/5]

  • 360

    [3/5]

  • 360

    - Hey, Fade. Go away.

    [4/5]

  • 360

    [3/5]

  • WII

    - The NES-inspired games just aren't fun. As is most of this game.

    [3/5]

  • 360

    [4/5]

  • PC

    - When the music finally becomes more involved, the game gets so much better.

    [4/5]

  • PC

    - These ten or so minutes shouldn't count.

    [3/5]

  • PC

    - Agh, that fart balloon puzzle took too many attempts to get it right.

    [3/5]

  • PS3

    - Bad music (not counting the credits).

    [3/5]

  • PS3

    - Don't have the patience to collect all the jewels. But the music was improved. Too bad Stage 6 exists as it does.

    [3/5]

  • PS3

    - That was... something.

    [?/5]

  • PS3

    - Just okay.

    [2/5]

  • 360

    - This should be a 1 for poor combat and horrible soundtrack, yet I anxiously burned through it. This had great potential that really doesn't coalesce.

    [2/5]

  • 360

    - It took longer for me to start enjoying myself, right when I started collecting the shards. After that, that's when I started having a blast. Damn, this has some of the best sounds, with the voiceover being the reason to play this. Complaint-wise, the part that drags the game down were the challenges, which left me having no desire to play the rest after getting first place in a few. That said, this game remains in my consciousness, as I find myself humming the music and then longing for another run with the New Game Plus.

    [5/5]

  • 360

    - This was the game I've been craving for ever since playing Pixeljunk Shooter 1 & 2 and feeling disappointed afterwards. That's not to say that it has no annoyances, just minor ones. Both this and Shooter 2 share the frustrating in-the-dark, carry-the-torch level/area, yet ITSP manages to be fun. I don't believe the shortness hurts the game, if it were any longer it'd be long in the tooth.

    [4/5]

  • GBA

    - Ah, that's the stuff. (Should note that this took me just as long to beat as ITSP did.)

    [4/5]

  • PC

    - Premise seemed interesting enough to warrant the $7 purchase, but that was purely based on how good the quality of the presentation is -- perhaps a bad decision. From the trailer, this Flash-based game is a moody yet meditative piece of interactive storytelling of a woman recovering from a traumatic accident.

    The problem, of course, is that its story is either too sparse or too bland. The intro involves multiple friends in a car, but we never understand what happened to them. Often when collecting the memory-infused Polaroids, the character will ramble or give instructions to the player (she talks about a spray bottle for some reason). Navigation can occasionally be too cumbersome, with the Okami-esque drawing system not fully explained. Why am I making Sprint ads with my movements and actions?

    While the game does let you veer off the beaten path, there's no reward -- like an alternate ending -- besides a neat little animation for doing so. The only reward for doing so is receiving a check in the box for finding it. When I opened a box, why did red blood cells go floating out like balloons? Oh, back to the title page. Pointless.

    The woman's VO is -- to put it nicely -- boring, delivered dryly without emotion as the short soundtrack loop repeats a bit too much. There's a lack of drive with the game, yet it is incapable of reaching a point of calmness that I believe it's after. The digital clicking sounds for movement between the still photographs become annoying, especially when so when searching for all the Polaroids.

    I've read elsewhere about the air of pretentiousness, but I don't believe that's a fair assessment. To be pretentious, I believe the creators would had to actually been capable to do as such. Rather, there's an air of experimentation gone wrong. This could have been an emotional experience, but it fails by being a naive mumbled mess. Every movement-related Polaroid that repeated across the four chapters was removing me from the experience. I would prefer those repetitions were filled with more story elements that would fascinate me and ask me to return. When I went back and tried to find every hidden bit, I wished it was more like Samorost and was filled with hidden things and objects to find and interact with.

    What ends up happening, though, is that these dreams start to feel like unwanted and unwarranted nightmares. [SPOILER-ish?] But this game does fascinate me to some weird level because by the end of it, with the final cutscene where nothing happens -- and I mean nothing-- I came to the realization that this woman killed all of her friends in a car accident. But this is never explained and truly alluded to. Presumptuously, the ghosts in her memories are those friends. But she’s still too concerned by her law school exams to really care, and since we’re playing as her, we too struggle to really care.

    [1/5]

  • PC

    - This is looking like a campaign-once-a-week kind of game. So let me keep track: I

    [4/5]

  • PC

    - It's an alright little game that has some uneven bits of difficulty -- and a yet-to-be-fixed bug in the PC version that requires you to first delete the game's save files for it to actually save -- yet manages to still charm.

    [3/5]

  • PC

    - Eloquence cannot be achieved in expressing how majestically simple yet compulsively addicting this game is. The best game I've played during the summer.

    [5/5]

  • NDS

    - Having not finished a Pokemon game since Red/Blue, this was a wonderfully addictive world. I tasted a bit of Pearl/Diamond and couldn't get into it -- the touch controls just didn't work that well. This game, however, became my gateway drug back into the destruction of others' Pokemons, the endless grinding I do just so that I could pulverize without blinking an eye. Probably one of my favorite games of the year.

    [5/5]

  • WII

    - Despised the first three hours, loved the seventeen others. Great boss battles, horrible back-tracing. Eating food is perhaps the best thing this game has to offer, and that isn't an insult. Having completed the second story arcs, I honestly don't feel the need to spend the hours grinding to get the third.

    [4/5]

  • 360

    - Child of Eden is like rock candy for the eyes. Eat too much, you will get sick. The problem, of course, is that it's just candy, not a lot of game. The last of the five levels is the least impressive, which makes me wish it had double the amount of levels while also removing the restriction of having to repeat levels multiple times to progress further.

    [3/5]

  • PS3

    - The morality system. The world-trapped-in-a-globe feeling. The instant-die-in-a-body-of-water gimmick. The odd story and characters. I'm just not in love with this as I was with the first.

    [3/5]

  • WII

    - It's the little details that seem to make this game more than just an overload of cuteness. But by the time I reached the last two levels, the twee-ness became less satisfying and the gameplay more of a chore.

    3/5

  • 360

    - At the end, I think I enjoyed this more than Origins. Character interactions were absolutely fascinating, even if character's actions during the endgame were strained. Complaints aside, this a tighter and more streamlined game -- for better or worse. Going back and forth between this and Origins, the new art style is welcomed, and helps give it a distinction that this isn't the same game (by a long shot).

    [4/5]

  • 360

    - Once accustomed to the never-ending onslaught of penis and orifice jokes, the game becomes funny right around the moment when the game abruptly changes into something simple and splendid for three brief chapters.

    [4/5]

  • PS3

    -

    [3/5]

  • PS3

    -

    [3/5]

  • PS3

    -

    [4/5]

  • PS3

    -

    [3/5]

  • PS3

    - There are so many problems with this game (the questionable voice-acting, except for Madison's actress; the crowd scenes; the pretentiousness of the first hour; the reasoning behind the killings; the future-tech in present time), but there's a point where it becomes a roller coaster ride and pushes out a much better experience. Not perfect, hard to recommend, but damn, those last three hours are great. [4/5]

  • WII

    - One of those games where the weakest part is that of the gameplay. Simple, boring, and useless; the same came be said about the level design (yay, backtracking). Otherwise, I appreciate that there is a game which ruminates on the idea of death and loss to the extent this one does. Collecting the memories of those departed is the reason why this game is worth playing to the end. These text-driven stories stand out as the emotional strength of the game, the best of which are the stories of the bells, of the marriage, and of the ballerina and the botanist -- the last being perhaps the best executed and the most haunting in conclusion. This may be an oxymoron, but this is one of those slightly awful games I can actually highly recommend.

    [2/5]

  • PS3

    - Dull, uninspired gameplay, mixed with lush dreamscapes. Hampered by weird and odd choices (awful mini-games, low-bitrate cinematics, a length that's a bit tiring, weird character design), it still is a worthwhile experience best played slowly.

    [4/5]

  • PS3

    - Great platforming, unresponsive and often infuriating combat. This entry highlights my problem with the Uncharted series: the endless killing of goons, often without cause. Still, gorgeous locations, great acting, lively music, but it's still missing the charm of Uncharted 2's love triangle and emotional heft. And then every set piece feels strangely familiar [Blizzard = Sandstorm;].

    [3/5]

  • 360

    - Don't know if I can ever finish this puzzle game, but after the various attempts, I nearly have 100% on every stage. I think I've reached a point where I don't think playing this for a completionist's sake is why I'd want to play it any more. It's just complex relaxation game.

    [4/5]

  • 360

    -

    [5/5]

  • PS3

    -

    [4/5]

  • PC

    -

    [3/5]