moywar700's forum posts

#1 Edited by moywar700 (174 posts) -

Anybody prefer novelette over novels?A novelette will have 7,500 to 17500 words compared to a 100000 word novel.A novelette will be much quicker,fast and easy. There are pretty small enough to fit into a person's pocket. A person may read a novelette once every day since they're that quick.If that person is very busy then a novelette will fit them well.

Novels will feel more rewarding since a person will invest more time into it.A person who reads a novelette will have read more stories than a person who reads a novel though.

Thoughts?

#2 Edited by moywar700 (174 posts) -

she would be horrible with games that require good hand coordination so fighting games are out.

I guess fighting games are out. "Popcorn" games is what I should get for her

#3 Posted by moywar700 (174 posts) -

hates shooting games and hates violence.

like music

#4 Posted by moywar700 (174 posts) -

This isn't for me, this is for someone one.

#5 Posted by moywar700 (174 posts) -

The grass is always greener on the other side.

#6 Posted by moywar700 (174 posts) -

@Sargus said:

@moywar700: Well I'd say there's a lot more to it than that (they don't offer entire philosophy courses on things like art and aesthetics because this kind of thing is always cut and dry), but sure, if you want to be extremely simplistic.

Again, literature being, by definition, related to writing (if you wanna be all about Merriam-Webster: "writings in prose or verse"), you can in some sense have literature in a game, but it cannot be a game itself.

I mean, let's look at music. By definition, music is "the science or art of ordering tones or sounds in succession, in combination, and in temporal relationships to produce a composition having unity and continuity." Games have that, right? Some games (like Sound Shapes) are built around the entire concept!

But you would never call a game music. You say a game has music in it, or you say a game is very musical, but the game itself is not music. Music is sound -- games are much more than sound. That's part of what makes them games.

Games are also much more than writing. They can be very well written, to the point where, if the writing stood alone, you might call that writing "literature," but the game itself is not literature.

I concede.

#7 Edited by moywar700 (174 posts) -

@Sargus said:

@moywar700 said:

@Sargus said:

@moywar700 said:

The meaning of Literature means creative writing of recognized artistic value.Literature is merely creative writing.

As someone who majored in Creative Writing and also loves video games ... no, not really.

I would not call a great movie literature. I would not call a great game literature. I would not call great music literature. Now a book? A book is literature.

That is not to say that movies, games and music aren't (or can not be) art, but that's a completely different word with a completely different meaning. Similarly, movies, games and music can have amazing writing, creative or not. That doesn't make them literature.

I think you're trying to stretch the word "literature" to make it mean something it doesn't. No matter how great games become -- even if they have writing that ends up rivaling the best novels in history -- they won't technically be "literature."

Literary? Maybe. I could say System Shock 2 is a very literary game (like I believe Harvey Smith did during a Quakecon 2012 panel "Looking Back at Looking Glass"). But I would not say it is literature.

Why don't you think it can't be Literature?

Because literature is use of the written word more or less exclusively. Something penned by an author or authors and visible on a page -- even an electronic page. Not moving pictures, not interactive programs ...

I even take some issue with the concept of plays being literature, though they're much closer to just being spoken word books (which we have to include for the sake of works like The Odyssey, which were told orally), so I'm more likely to give them a pass, I guess.

Now, as has been said before in this thread, you could possibly make a case for a game's script being literature, but I think that would be silly -- a script isn't meant to be digested on its own. It's meant to be a tool used in the creation of a final, more artful product. It still takes a whole heck of a lot of skill to create, obviously, but it's an altogether different form of writing than, say, a novel.

Games are beautiful in that they encompass a little bit of so many art forms, from music to writing to acting to aesthetics to performance, etc. But I wouldn't call a game a piece of literature because it has great writing any more than I would call Bastion an album because it has great music.

You could maybe, mayyyyybe make a case for, say, a text adventure (a la Zork). I still personally think the interactive nature that goes into it (which requires programming, which is a separate entity than the basic writing) eliminates it from what I see as "literature," but I wouldn't argue that issue with someone too passionately.

So you don't see video games are literature because they are moving pictures and interactive?

#8 Posted by moywar700 (174 posts) -

@Sargus said:

@moywar700 said:

The meaning of Literature means creative writing of recognized artistic value.Literature is merely creative writing.

As someone who majored in Creative Writing and also loves video games ... no, not really.

I would not call a great movie literature. I would not call a great game literature. I would not call great music literature. Now a book? A book is literature.

That is not to say that movies, games and music aren't (or can not be) art, but that's a completely different word with a completely different meaning. Similarly, movies, games and music can have amazing writing, creative or not. That doesn't make them literature.

I think you're trying to stretch the word "literature" to make it mean something it doesn't. No matter how great games become -- even if they have writing that ends up rivaling the best novels in history -- they won't technically be "literature."

Literary? Maybe. I could say System Shock 2 is a very literary game (like I believe Harvey Smith did during a Quakecon 2012 panel "Looking Back at Looking Glass"). But I would not say it is literature.

Why don't you think it can't be Literature?

#9 Posted by moywar700 (174 posts) -

@rentfn said:

If I have a B.A. in Literature can I apply to Harmonix and Irrational instead of teach 11th grade??

You may work as a story writing for them.

#10 Posted by moywar700 (174 posts) -

@thatpinguino said:

Google dictionary has the answer.

lit·er·a·ture

Noun:

  1. Written works, esp. those considered of superior or lasting artistic merit: "a great work of literature".

  2. Books and writings published on a particular subject: "the literature on environmental epidemiology".

All power to google.

Thank you for proving my point.