Game Controls: Not Like Riding a Bicycle

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ahoodedfigure

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Edited By ahoodedfigure

So, as many of you may have heard, Good Old Games .comhas cut a deal with Electronic Arts to widen their library.  As their silly ad (found via Rock Paper Shotgun) says, this is huge. Right now they're releasing Dungeon Keeper and Privateer, and will soon include games like Alpha Centauri. I was especially interested to see Ultima Underworld 1 and 2 being released as a single package for like 6 bucks, as the discs we had are lost to history, and I loved the mid game of 2 so much it probably colored how I looked at the potential of fantasy games forever after that.  But as I was reminded the last time I played UW2, the controls are not as intuitive as modern schemes.
 
I remember learning controls for just about any game, and after getting over the hump of acclimation, they would usually become second nature to me, no matter how weird. Star Raiders, that game that I gushed about back when Giant Bomb was first made, has several keyboard controls that had to be memorized in order to play the game effectively:
 

No Caption Provided
After playing the game enough, it would be like second nature, and I coould boot the old Atari up days later and still remember what to do. But now, if I tried to play this game it would take me a bit to get used to the thing again, and I might bitch a bit about their layout (but at least the letters each stand for something, making it easier to remember than controls that are all clustered together).
 
Game controls are NOT like riding a bicycle; the analogy breaks down when you realize that a lot of what goes on when you do ride a bike has to do with balance instincts and coordination, not necessarily learning each time what the handlebar and the pedals do. The complexity of game controls lie in the versatility of the controls themselves, and so memorization is a lot more esoteric. You sort of have to wait for the old patterns of a game you just played to be supplanted by the habits needed for the new game, and this can take a bit of time.  
 
For instance, in KotOR I'm still hitting buttons I used for Jade Empire (the running roll, especially, since it takes forever to get around in KotOR). The games are close cousins, so I guess whatever training I gave my brain still needs to be overwritten by the KotOR controls.
 
But with these old games, habits of game designers to put controls in certain, well-tested spots just weren't there, and control interfaces were still coming into common use. The mouselook, which we now consider a staple of first-person views on home computers, just isn't there for most older games, especially without mods, and when I look at the Ultima Underworld package, having to learn the control scheme all over again is probably the biggest problem I might have with getting the thing.
 
Yet, why does this stop me? I was able to play the thing before just fine. My memories of the game aren't of my struggling with the controls; they're of dimension hopping and seeing strange lands, figuring out puzzles, sliding around on ice, swimming away from betentacled lurkers, and hanging out with Iolo.  So obviously I did get past that old control hump and get on with enjoying the game. Is it because I'm getting old? Is it because the idea of going back to a typewriter after using a computer and printer means added work for little added benefit?  What's going on?
 
I guess it is ultimately a question of efficiency. If the controls add something, if they're indispensable even when they're complex or their particular configuration somehow enhances the game, then as long as you get used to them they're fine. But if a better way comes along that makes the old systems obsolete, it feels like the world has moved on, and that learning a complicated control scheme that ignores (or was made before) later innovations is an exercise in anachronism and not much else.
 
I will probably get Ultima Underworld, but I'm secretly hoping some intrepid modder will add mouselook to the mix. I think this is because I still feel that there's a great game in there, with some nifty physics and interesting worlds to explore. That I have to learn a few extra commands and be a bit slower when I'm looking around shouldn't kill my enjoyment.
 
That said, maybe I should toughen up a bit and remember that learning a control scheme isn't the end of the world. As long as it's not famously bad, it wouldn't hurt to meet the game on its own terms.  Who knows, maybe I'll learn that at least some older control methods just went out of style, and we're really "obsolete" at all.
 
Any thoughts on control schemes over the ages? I'm pretty sure some of my readers are happy with modern changes, but I'm curious if there's anyone out there that misses some of the old conventions. Any old control schemes that were easier to (re)learn than you thought? Or harder? Any of them so weird and arcane that they cut you off from a childhood experience that was perfectly acceptable the first time around? Lemme know.
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#1  Edited By ahoodedfigure

So, as many of you may have heard, Good Old Games .comhas cut a deal with Electronic Arts to widen their library.  As their silly ad (found via Rock Paper Shotgun) says, this is huge. Right now they're releasing Dungeon Keeper and Privateer, and will soon include games like Alpha Centauri. I was especially interested to see Ultima Underworld 1 and 2 being released as a single package for like 6 bucks, as the discs we had are lost to history, and I loved the mid game of 2 so much it probably colored how I looked at the potential of fantasy games forever after that.  But as I was reminded the last time I played UW2, the controls are not as intuitive as modern schemes.
 
I remember learning controls for just about any game, and after getting over the hump of acclimation, they would usually become second nature to me, no matter how weird. Star Raiders, that game that I gushed about back when Giant Bomb was first made, has several keyboard controls that had to be memorized in order to play the game effectively:
 

No Caption Provided
After playing the game enough, it would be like second nature, and I coould boot the old Atari up days later and still remember what to do. But now, if I tried to play this game it would take me a bit to get used to the thing again, and I might bitch a bit about their layout (but at least the letters each stand for something, making it easier to remember than controls that are all clustered together).
 
Game controls are NOT like riding a bicycle; the analogy breaks down when you realize that a lot of what goes on when you do ride a bike has to do with balance instincts and coordination, not necessarily learning each time what the handlebar and the pedals do. The complexity of game controls lie in the versatility of the controls themselves, and so memorization is a lot more esoteric. You sort of have to wait for the old patterns of a game you just played to be supplanted by the habits needed for the new game, and this can take a bit of time.  
 
For instance, in KotOR I'm still hitting buttons I used for Jade Empire (the running roll, especially, since it takes forever to get around in KotOR). The games are close cousins, so I guess whatever training I gave my brain still needs to be overwritten by the KotOR controls.
 
But with these old games, habits of game designers to put controls in certain, well-tested spots just weren't there, and control interfaces were still coming into common use. The mouselook, which we now consider a staple of first-person views on home computers, just isn't there for most older games, especially without mods, and when I look at the Ultima Underworld package, having to learn the control scheme all over again is probably the biggest problem I might have with getting the thing.
 
Yet, why does this stop me? I was able to play the thing before just fine. My memories of the game aren't of my struggling with the controls; they're of dimension hopping and seeing strange lands, figuring out puzzles, sliding around on ice, swimming away from betentacled lurkers, and hanging out with Iolo.  So obviously I did get past that old control hump and get on with enjoying the game. Is it because I'm getting old? Is it because the idea of going back to a typewriter after using a computer and printer means added work for little added benefit?  What's going on?
 
I guess it is ultimately a question of efficiency. If the controls add something, if they're indispensable even when they're complex or their particular configuration somehow enhances the game, then as long as you get used to them they're fine. But if a better way comes along that makes the old systems obsolete, it feels like the world has moved on, and that learning a complicated control scheme that ignores (or was made before) later innovations is an exercise in anachronism and not much else.
 
I will probably get Ultima Underworld, but I'm secretly hoping some intrepid modder will add mouselook to the mix. I think this is because I still feel that there's a great game in there, with some nifty physics and interesting worlds to explore. That I have to learn a few extra commands and be a bit slower when I'm looking around shouldn't kill my enjoyment.
 
That said, maybe I should toughen up a bit and remember that learning a control scheme isn't the end of the world. As long as it's not famously bad, it wouldn't hurt to meet the game on its own terms.  Who knows, maybe I'll learn that at least some older control methods just went out of style, and we're really "obsolete" at all.
 
Any thoughts on control schemes over the ages? I'm pretty sure some of my readers are happy with modern changes, but I'm curious if there's anyone out there that misses some of the old conventions. Any old control schemes that were easier to (re)learn than you thought? Or harder? Any of them so weird and arcane that they cut you off from a childhood experience that was perfectly acceptable the first time around? Lemme know.
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danielkempster

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#2  Edited By danielkempster

I actually wrote a blog on a similar topic about six months ago. I'm of the opinion that there's no such thing as an awful control scheme, preferring instead to think of it in terms of stubborn players not willing to get to grips with something a bit different. It's universally recognised that games stand apart from film and literature because of their interactive element, and I see the controls as a big part of that element. A lot of games are defined by their controls, for instance. I personally see homogenisation of control schemes as something to be avoided, something which robs games of their uniqueness.

Right now, I'm playing an old PS1 title called MediEvil, and I have to press the O button to jump - not the X button, which is usually the Jump Button in games of this nature. It was a little irksome at first, but I've persevered, and I'm used to it. This has always been my attitude towards controls, and I don't anticipate it changing any time soon.

I'll also take this opportunity to apologise for not commenting on your blogs more often. You usually write about games I've never heard of, let alone played, so I often find it difficult to find an aspect of your blogs to discuss. For what it's worth, I always read your blogs, and I consider you to be one of the most accomplished and consistent bloggers here on Giant Bomb.

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#3  Edited By Mento  Moderator

I imagine the control schemes for PC games have always been a balance of convenience and utility. There's a hundred keys you could use, but designers have to consider how often the player will actually remember to use them.

Conversely, I tend to think of the homogenisation of control schemes as perfectly acceptable. A game's creativity shines through in so many different ways already, and providing someone with a quicker acclimation process for the basics allows them to focus on the controls that are unique to the game far easier. I believe that's why most games from even 15 years ago allow you to reconfigure the entire control set to suit what you're used to.
 
I assume Ultima Underworld had that on-screen d-pad for movement? A mouselook function wouldn't work with that. I always found the d-pad system vexing with the dungeon crawlers that went full panoramic because the turning speeds were often screwy.

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#4  Edited By ahoodedfigure
@dankempster:  Link your post on controls so I can read it, if you have the time.
 
There are definitely some games that betray themselves through their controls, but this is more about the fidelity with what you do and how that's reflected on screen, and how straightforwardly they help you accomplish this. Worrying about what buttons to push or whatever, I agree, is only about our own stubbornness.  Some standards are OK, but too much and you ruin potential innovation and changes in "tone", for lack of a more precise word to describe how controls reflect back upon the game we're playing. 
 
Also, the instrument has a lot to do with it. The more complicated it gets, the more ways things can really innovate (or get twisted up). Our old Atari proto-PC had a keyboard and a one-button joystick, which couldn't be more different in terms of approach.
 
I appreciate your kind words, by the way. As long as this blog gets read, makes a serviceably decent point, and doesn't waste too much of your time, I consider it an accomplishment. I wish I were more consistent, and I would be if I made a living doing something like this, but I guess that's probably a poor excuse. It would be ameliorated a bit if I could get some stats on who reads this stuff.
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#5  Edited By ahoodedfigure
@Mento: UW has an onscreen pad, yeah, and I think it had corresponding keyboard keys and the cursor would change shape relative to where it was in the view window, though it's been a while. It also had scaling turning speed, I think, based on where you clicked the turn.
 
Like I said just a bit ago, some homogenization is OK, because it gives us a platform to build on. I think of it as working toward meeting the goal of the game, and if the game's derivative or following the same general pattern, it's nice to be able to fall into it to find out what else might be different. It doesn't make sense to change the control scheme just cuz.   Still, if we get a bit too rigid, new gameplay elements may demand some sort of change, even if we're working with the same controller we've been working with for years, be it mouse or this generation's version of the old joystick.
 
As for mouselook not working, I think games running similar-era engines have managed to mod limited-angle mouselooks in, though the mechanics and difficulties behind that process are beyond me.
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#6  Edited By Tanikaze

Ultimately, I really think that control schemes are a big part of the game and how it's presented. This is bad of me but I see using the original control scheme as the more "authentic" way of approaching an old game. Starcraft is a really good example. When you look at Starcraft 2, everything's sorta on the left side of the keyboard. That's a pretty comfortable place for hotkeys to be and the game makes it so if you want to you can really just use 1-6 when it comes to number keys, practically never hit the I button(fucking infestation pit piece of shit hotkey fhgeaghaefhyua), and be all good playing the game. It seems minor, but this is actually a huge departure from Starcraft: Brood War. 
 
One of the essential things about Brood War, that dramatically(and I mean DRAMATICALLY) impacts the game, how it plays out, how you get good at it, how you think about approaching it, how it plays out in a competitive environment, etc is how much harder it is mechanically than Starcraft 2. One of the things that makes it so hard is that pretty much the whole keyboard is used. You make overlords constantly as Zerg, and that's O, but you also make hydralisks, which is H, and zerglings, which is Z, and you make drones which are D. Marines are M and siege mode is O. Probes are famously on P, and like all workers they need to be produced nonstop at the beginning of the game, which forces Protoss players to hotkey their nexuses to 8, 9, and 0. This is a really, really big deal. It actually increases the skill cap of the game, which is huge in any competitive game.  Mods exist to change these keys, and you can rebind stuff in Starcraft 2, which is fine, but in BW you are actually expected not to use mods in a multiplayer environment. The keys are considered to be a big part of the game and set in stone. Not just out of fairness; anyone could use a mod, potentially. It's out of the fact that this is the way the game is, and according to BW fans, it's better that way.
 
Just some food for thought.

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#7  Edited By ArbitraryWater

I'm not one to especially complain about nonstandard controls, but standardizing is something that should happen to most things at some point. Being forced to use circle to confirm instead of X for Metal Gear Solid games because Japan is more than a little obnoxious until you get the hang of it. Similarly, I totally play UU with the keyboard (thankfully, it happens to be WASD and C for movement. Because it wouldn't be an old game without at least one control quirk) because the idea of scrolling a mouse around to move in a first person game is so foreign to me. Privateer also has a lot of keyboard shortcuts, but thankfully they're pretty logical. G is for guns.
 
I just went ahead and bought all three games. It's been my policy for a while that if I can *legally* obtain a game on a digital download service I'll purchase it even if I already have some sort of .zip or .iso of it already. As far as I can tell, all three games have their merits (One of these days I'll have to get more fully into Ultima Underworld. The second one is probably more approachable though, by virtue of having a centralized hub.) and I'll probably write something about Wing Commander and Dungeon Keeper at some point. This deal might be a bigger deal than when they got Atari-Hasbro and all the D&D games of merit from the last 12 years.

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#8  Edited By ahoodedfigure
@Tanikaze: especially in games where reaction time is a factor like that, yeah, positioning and ease of recall can make a difference. It's sometimes hard to plan without a lot of foreknowledge, though, just how things might turn out. I've heard stories about how they pre-planned the hell out of a control scheme, thinking it would all work out a certain way for players, only to see players adapt (or not) and have their well-laid plans go all wonky.
 
@ArbitraryWater: I think in my status I said the deal was huge, but I didn't realize they were using the same word. It IS huge, though, and I wonder if the EA person talking about how they had no interest in their older games was said knowing they were negotiating with GOG. 
 
Privateer might be interesting, I remember playing it a bit when I was younger, but I've played so much of ASCII Sector now that I'd probably miss boarding actions too much! 
 
I really haven't played much at all of UW, but you might be right about the hub in UW2. All I know is that the hub is also connected to some pretty diverse and weird places, and that's what I loved about it, especially since it encouraged exploration and puzzle solving as a means of finding hidden places.
 
Your purchasing ethic is right on target, I think. As long as things are properly preserved, they should get their due. Reminds me a bit of this article.
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#9  Edited By Karl_Boss

Keyboard controls really aren't like riding a bicycle....they can be complicated and complex especially with old games that don't use the standard WASD.

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#10  Edited By Bigandtasty

Aside from Brood War vs. Wings of Liberty, which @Tanikaze already went over, the difficult control scheme that comes to mind for me is flight games after playing so many FPS and TPS. I was decent at Star Fox games many years ago; nothing super-special but could have relatively smooth runs through the hardest paths of the game. Now I come back to it and it almost feels foreign to have to aim with the same control stick (or pad) that you use to move.
 
I must also join @dankempster in apologizing for frequently reading your blogs but not providing enough responses. Sometimes I think I can't produce any worthy commentary on what you and previous commenters have already laid out, but I'll do my best to do more in the future.

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#11  Edited By Dagbiker

FYI: Riding a bicycle isn't even like Riding a bicycle.

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ahoodedfigure

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#12  Edited By ahoodedfigure
@Dagbiker: Thanks for my information, but I'm pretty sure it is. You not too fond of cliches?
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#13  Edited By ahoodedfigure
@Bigandtasty: I haven't played a flight sim, if that's what you're talking about, in ages, although they were the first type of game that really showed me what computers could do beyond just 2D platformers and the like. That's the only time I'll use a back-is-up control scheme, although it's not too much of a switch for me since I guess that resides in a different part of my brain. But when you do control reversals I have to coach myself through it, like in my often referred-to Star Raiders. For all their technology, they still force a reversal of controls on you if you switch to aft view, which can still mess me up.
 
Thanks for saying so; we've gotten used to thinking that comments equal approval, but I don't mind if people only comment when they have something they think is worth saying. It's good to hear some folks like what I write about, though, no doubt.
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Brackynews

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#14  Edited By Brackynews

For anyone who has bought a joystick, or a paddle, or a racing wheel, or a flight yoke, or a weighted mouse, you already know there is no one perfect control scheme. But you've also taken advantage of your power of choice over which configuration of joystick you like to use, how many buttons your mouse has, or the tension in the racing wheel. This is natural, this is expected. If you want to sit on the other side of your car they can put the steering column there.

It kind of boggles my mind when I see games (say, from DICE) who release on consoles, release on PC, and say y'know, we're going to limit what controls you can actually play this game with. Basically allowing one scheme over another, like full keyboard with no way to reconfigure joypad support to use a 360 controller, which they don't support on PC despite making it work on 2 consoles.

The fact that Bungie changing the default Halo scheme makes news, is patently ridiculous. From a technical perspective there is no reason that buttons cannot be fully remappable by the user. Even in the case where some buttons are analog (or pressure sensitive digital, if you'd rather), there is still more than one of those buttons available. From an accessibility standpoint, I think the ignorance of presuming all gamers are fully colour-capable with two eyes and 10 working fingers... well just give me a few minutes and I'll find you people in the games industry that does not apply to. Never mind random customer statistics, real people that earn their living with video games have disabilities. Are you going to tell me with a straight face that "putting everyone on the same playing field" overrides the ability for people to enjoy the game in a way that works for them? Mouse-and-keyboardies with 3 monitors are really that afraid someone with a Move wand will get the drop on them? I don't think so.

I agree with @dankempster that "the homogenisation of control schemes" won't help the industry towards trying new things (like Halo:CE did). But even for players like myself who only have to cope with muscle memory, and throwing a grenade when I meant to bring up my Pip-Boy menu, the fact remains that if your game has grenades I have a button that I'd like to use for that. Why are you taking away that choice from me? Who the hell would accept a change from WASD to HBNM? You'd rebind that shit.

For those interested, I could use some help filling out this list better:

Full button remapping

Console games that allow full user control of button input.

1. Resistance: Fall of Man

Nice swapping menu.

2. Ghostbusters: The Video Game

Xbox360

3. Deadly Premonition

Full remapping is only common sense, right Zach?

4. Fallout: New Vegas

Buried a bit in the menus, but nicely done!

5. Conduit 2

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#15  Edited By beckley205

The first Indy on 2600 where you had to use two joysticks seems stupid not that ive played it and most complex and i use that word loosely ipod game controls get confusing. Between tilting and touching a certain section of the screen where the actions happening its just so annoying not that i have an ipod.

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SeriouslyNow

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#16  Edited By SeriouslyNow

One word : Gunship. Fuck you Microprose, I had RSI at age 12.

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#17  Edited By ahoodedfigure
@beckley205: Actually, in Indy 500 you were supposed to use special controllers designed for the game, not two joysticks. The two joysticks thing was sort of what you had to do if you didn't have the controllers, if I remember right. They looked like paddles but instead of constantly firing like the paddles did, I think they kept track of a bunch of different directions so you could have, what was for the time, a bit more precise control. Not 100% sure how they worked, though. That was actually a pretty fun game, assuming you had the right controls :)  
 
EDIT: Ah, you meant Indiana Jones. Guess I'm just showing off my Extreme Age badge, there.
 
As for the tilt fad of late, I guess I would sort of hate it if I ever had to deal with it. I sometimes hold a controller at different angles to reduce stress on the wrists, or like if I'm lying down with my head propped up but still playing. I would HATE to have to worry about what angle my hands were at on a controller. Bleah.
 
@SeriouslyNow: Heh. I'm afraid to ask what you had to go through. I know some designers seem to have a cruelty streak with some control schemes, though.
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xaLieNxGrEyx

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#18  Edited By xaLieNxGrEyx

Complete opposite here, never forget a games controls, at least not any longer than 5seconds of playing and/or thinking about it
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#19  Edited By ahoodedfigure
@Brackynews: Of course there's not much of an excuse for a company to force a single (or even a set) of controls on someone when it's pretty easy to reconfigure things now. The sensitivity and range of response in a given input may make certain controls on a pad not work right if mapped to certain outputs but you could still have a limited configuration system that, at least as far as I know, should be pretty easy to program, as long as you make sure the game's in-game messages map to whatever you've chosen as your new scheme, and any performance enhancements would meme out to the public anyway.

And yeah, the color issue is a bit galling.
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ahoodedfigure

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#20  Edited By ahoodedfigure
@xaLieNxGrEyx: Cool. With certain games I may be that lucky after a few minutes, but I guess my inner card catalog needs to be updated to microfiche or whatever.
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#21  Edited By Brackynews

@ahoodedfigure said:

my inner card catalog needs to be updated to microfiche or whatever.

This is why we are friends. :D

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#22  Edited By xaLieNxGrEyx
@ahoodedfigure said:
@xaLieNxGrEyx: Cool. With certain games I may be that lucky after a few minutes, but I guess my inner card catalog needs to be updated to microfiche or whatever.

I'm not a robot :(
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#23  Edited By ahoodedfigure
@Brackynews: Oh! I just saw that reply for some reason. You weren't a ghost just then.
 
@xaLieNxGrEyx: That's a good thing! When the machines rise up against us we can use your skills :)  
 
Now I have the "I Am not a Robot" song in my head.