On Amnesia

The reason I've always been a defender of the "games are art" argument is because I don't see a lot of things (at least story, audio, and visual-wise) that video games don't have in common with other media, like television, movies, and comic books. A lot of the same tropes in those three aforementioned categories, good or bad, come up again and again in all three.

One particular plot device that I've always universally hated is amnesia. Now, I understand why it's used, especially in video games: the player character doesn't know themselves any more than we do, so we learn about their past as they learn about themselves, it's no fun/too easy if you start off a sequel with all the maxed-out powers from the first game, and it's really confusing for people who didn't play the original. It's just that "you don't remember anything" or "you have to save the world alone" is rarely ever justified in a game in a way that doesn't feel super shoehorned in, even if game mechanics-wise, I totally understand it. Has it ever been used well? I don't like having a "never say never" attitude about anything.

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Posted by medacris

The reason I've always been a defender of the "games are art" argument is because I don't see a lot of things (at least story, audio, and visual-wise) that video games don't have in common with other media, like television, movies, and comic books. A lot of the same tropes in those three aforementioned categories, good or bad, come up again and again in all three.

One particular plot device that I've always universally hated is amnesia. Now, I understand why it's used, especially in video games: the player character doesn't know themselves any more than we do, so we learn about their past as they learn about themselves, it's no fun/too easy if you start off a sequel with all the maxed-out powers from the first game, and it's really confusing for people who didn't play the original. It's just that "you don't remember anything" or "you have to save the world alone" is rarely ever justified in a game in a way that doesn't feel super shoehorned in, even if game mechanics-wise, I totally understand it. Has it ever been used well? I don't like having a "never say never" attitude about anything.