This blog: paid for by the letter S. And pants-crapping terror.


Silent Hill 2

( I'm genuinely surprised that it took me this long to beat the game.) Two reasons: first, I got this back near the beginning of March, alongside Panzer Dragoon Orta, but haven't really touched it since the beginning of last week. Second, that thing I said a few words ago. To recap: it took me less than a week to beat the game. In fact, *looks at Game Result screen*, my final time was a little over 7 hours. It's taken me more time to write blogs than that. Hell, it probably took me longer to write this blog than it did to beat Silent Hill 2!
 
 A list of reasons to stay the hell away from New England.
Oh, right, I forgot that this blog was about Silent Hill 2. As the title suggests, this game takes place in Silent Hill, a foggy town that proves how scary New England is. Stay away from New England at all costs. There's a reason why Ted Kennedy drank a lot: it was to forget that he was in New England. Anybody who even comes close to such a creepy place automatically levels up to badass. Enter James Sunderland, an ugly man who looks like somebody cut a mouth-shaped hole into a slab of pork and put a wig on the whole thing (otherwise known as the ODST approach to character design). He's looking for his wife, who probably ran away once she realized that she married a humorless Denis Leary. Understandably, James runs to Silent Hill in search of her; ununderstandably, she died three years before the start of the game. The plot here is pretty damn confusing, which is odd, given that it's the one part of the game that people love more than the actual game part. (More on that later.) Don't get me wrong, it's actually pretty good, what with the symbolism and complex character development; it's just that NOTHING HAPPENS FOR A LOT OF THE GAME. Like the original Silent Hill, this one consists mostly of the protagonist bumping into locations in search of some random girl in his life.
 
Also, I find the characterization a bit weird. No, not with that mama's girl or the dude somehow uglier than James, I get why they're that way; I'm talking about James himself. This guy is such a badass (not surprising, given that he's been to New England) that dead bodies don't surprise him at all. When I stumbled across a dead body early in the game, his first thought was, "Sweet! I found that apartment key I needed!" Keep in mind that I didn't even know that there was an apartment in the area, let alone that it required a key to enter. The only conclusion I could come to was that James Sunderland is psychic. Either that, or he's MacGyver. You see a piece of hair, James sees the string he needs for his hook. Hell, he won't even use certain items for anything close to their intended use, like when he drops canned juice down a trash chute when he has about nine other items capable of doing the exact same thing. Do not question this man when he says that he has no use for something.
 
Instead, question this game for why all the puzzles are so damn weird. I should've known something was up when the game gave me difficulties for both action AND riddles. It has an effect, and the puzzles it does touch do feel genuinely and fairly challenging (even if they do destroy the immersion); I'm not talking about those puzzles. No, I'm talking about stuff like the elevator puzzle. Wait, why am I calling it a puzzle? Late in the game, you find this elevator that gives off a harpy shriek when you step on it. Turns out it has a weight limit of one person. AND NOTHING ELSE. You literally have to get rid of everything to use the elevator, which is only understandable when you're dropping off a sword that would make Cloud Strife feel like less of a man, not when a photo summons harpy fury. The worst part is that it's an employee elevator, leading me to believe that the hotel is staffed entirely through child slave labor. Later on, you use a can opener to open a can of LIGHT BULBS. I swear that half the puzzles in this game require a FAQ of some type, which probably explains why this feels like a point-and-click adventure.
 
 *sigh* Another day spent shopping at Wal-Mart.
Except it has one thing that point-and-click adventures never had: combat.....that doesn't revolve around crappy insults. If it did, the enemies would be spouting things like, "Christ, you suck at beating meat monsters! You'd think you'd have mastered that shit over three years, you freak of nature!" Instead, they spend their time spouting World War II radio sounds. (OK, they actually don't, but things get REALLY eerie once you realize that.) It does a really good job of scaring you, due to several factors like the perpetual fog and darkness surrounding the town, and the fact that fighting them is a bit of a chore. Hitting enemies regularly works well, but trying to whack things on the ground is near impossible, which is probably why half the enemies decide that walking on two legs is overrated. I first thought that you hit things on the ground by dicking around with the right analog stick, but now I think you have to hold down the X button. I say "think" because James still managed to fuck it up half the time. Look, I know that vulnerability is a huge part of fear, but there's a difference between truly being weak and truly being unable to get your character to bash things on the ground.
 
Hell, now that I think about it, this game does know how to pull off the "vulnerability" card, but never in the right places. OK, there is one place: enemy numbers. Handling one enemy is fine, but two enemies will absolutely murder you. Once, I came across three enemies; I believe it was at that point that the game just cut away to a Game Over screen. Of course, I was killing things with my trusty Steel Pipe, so that may have been the problem. After all, the game gives you so much handgun ammo that playing this game legally makes you Charlton Heston, but you'll never need it all because melee weapons work fine. When I finally decided to use the firearms, I noticed one weird thing: reloading through the menu. Why do it in the real world when all that tension and fear is just a click away? And now that I'm on a rant on the combat, why are there so few healing items in the game? Wait, that's the opposite of a rant. Hmmm.....oh! Why do bodies jump out of nowhere on certain roads? It's not scary in any way, Konami, it's just stupid.
 
So I've managed to debunk A LOT of the stuff that should make Silent Hill 2 good, begging the question, "Why do people love this game so damn much?" Well, I believe it's because this game is a master of atmosphere (or it would be if half the doors weren't broken). The level of detail is amazing, the game gets progressively more insane as you progress, and there's a genuine feeling of dread and terror when you hear your radio go off, but can't see what's causing it to do so. The feeling of dread you can only get when you take a book into the bathroom to read, but find that it has a portrait on the cover, and you can't take a dump because it now feels like somebody's watching you. Just me? Fine, how about when you step out of the shower and realize that you have to give birth to a brown eel, bringing about a sense that you've cleaned yourself for naught, and that slight fear that you'll slip off the seat, somehow. Still me? Fine, ho-I can't find that Boondocks clip I want. OK, moving on, part of the success is that it doesn't muck things up with a HUD of any kind. Looking for your health? Not gonna find it on the screen. Look in your hands; just like marriage, the more vibrations you feel, the worse things are. For you, at least. But I can't survive on atmosphere alone! I need things to do, and "find out what you need to do" doesn't count as something to do. Same with extra endings. I only mention that because of how short the game is. Oh, wait, I've already mentioned that. What else, what else.....oh, Pyramid Head's pretty creepy, when he's around. He gets the game the Almost Scariest Thing Award. I say "Almost" because there are much scarier things out there, like Girl Beck, Satan Cl-
 


Ch...Chicken Head....How d...
 


Why is it so dark, and wh-
 


No....NO! N-
 



 

Review Synopsis

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Spyro 2: Ripto's Rage

( I specifically requested against this music.) In fact, I'd have taken any other music available. In case you haven't caught on, this is the Queen, typing the rest of this thing after my husband made himself go insane. Forgive me for jumping straight into the blog, as I'm not very good at introductions. Also, I'm not acquainted with writing blogs, especially on video games I haven't played, so keep that in mind as you read this.
 
Anyway, Spyro 2, being the sequel to Spyro 1, should logically follow the story of that game, but for whatever reason, doesn't; Gnasty Gnorc (is that how it's spelled? That can't be it.) is out, and instead, you get Ripto, voiced by the man responsible for Jecht and many other game characters. Now that I look at the credits for this game, the production values for this game are pretty good: you have Tom Kenny doing a Billy West impression, an actual type of story, and it generally feels like a lot more effort was put into the game. Keep in mind that I don't say this exclusively for the story; just about everything, from the levels to the rest of the things I'll end up mentioning later on, feel like they've received a massive improvement from the last game.
 
 Oddly enough, Billy West did not do the voice for one of these dragons.
Take, for example, simply getting through the game. I can't tell you how it was done in the first Spyro, mainly because it doesn't look like it was ever consistent; you'd end up collecting all sets of items, hoping that you had enough of one group to make it to the next world or whatever. Not so in Ripto's Rage; talismans generally allow you to progress through the game, orbs unlock special levels (and regular levels at the end of the game, just to make the game longer), and gems allow you to buy new moves and levels and stuff. That last one doesn't count as making the game longer, as it never really sets the price so high that you need to collect more gems. You'll end up collecting all the gems you need in the levels, anyway, given how linear they seem to be. For the most part, levels are a straight line from start to talisman, orb requirements scattered along the way in little pockets you need not visit. I'm not insulting the game for being so linear, as it works just fine that way. What I will insult is the simplicity of the combat.
 
Not counting the boss battles for which there are FAQs I can pass off as a blog, all the enemies seem to die easily, their combat strategies being one-note (hit or flame, choose one). It's pretty disappointing, especially when you consider how complex everything else is. Instead of simply looking for the items you need, you have to do missions to complete them. One may consist of shooting down a bunch of spike-balls with a turret, another may involve rescuing baby turtles who are trapped in boxes, for some reason. There's enough variety to keep things from getting stale, and it's all executed well enough that none of it comes off as shoved in for the sake of being there. The best example of this is the collection of flying levels. Sure, they're not necessary, but so what? They still seemed fun to play, from what I've seen, and there's nothing wrong with them, at least on a technical level.
 
I could spend this final paragraph nitpicking the little flaws, like how the voice acting sometimes sounds like Avalar is code for The Matrix, or how it's too short and too easy, but instead, I'll complain about something greater: the power-ups. Each level has a certain power-up, like super-breath, super-charge, or super-get-launched-up-to-another-part-of-the-level. That's not the bad part; that honor goes to how you get the power-ups. You have to kill a certain amount of enemies, which is the only reason you'll ever do so. It doesn't even stay that way when you leave the level; you have to rekill the enemies each time you want the power-up....for less than a minute. Sadly, a lot of these power-ups last long enough just to confirm that they're there, probably to give it some artificial sense of challenge. Despite all that, Ripto's Rage is an amazing g-
 
Bushwald Sexyface said:

"Hey, King bloke, you kn-ugh. Why you wearing them fake booblies?"

...*runs away*
 

Review Synopsis

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52 Comments
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Posted by Video_Game_King

Silent Hill 2

( I'm genuinely surprised that it took me this long to beat the game.) Two reasons: first, I got this back near the beginning of March, alongside Panzer Dragoon Orta, but haven't really touched it since the beginning of last week. Second, that thing I said a few words ago. To recap: it took me less than a week to beat the game. In fact, *looks at Game Result screen*, my final time was a little over 7 hours. It's taken me more time to write blogs than that. Hell, it probably took me longer to write this blog than it did to beat Silent Hill 2!
 
 A list of reasons to stay the hell away from New England.
Oh, right, I forgot that this blog was about Silent Hill 2. As the title suggests, this game takes place in Silent Hill, a foggy town that proves how scary New England is. Stay away from New England at all costs. There's a reason why Ted Kennedy drank a lot: it was to forget that he was in New England. Anybody who even comes close to such a creepy place automatically levels up to badass. Enter James Sunderland, an ugly man who looks like somebody cut a mouth-shaped hole into a slab of pork and put a wig on the whole thing (otherwise known as the ODST approach to character design). He's looking for his wife, who probably ran away once she realized that she married a humorless Denis Leary. Understandably, James runs to Silent Hill in search of her; ununderstandably, she died three years before the start of the game. The plot here is pretty damn confusing, which is odd, given that it's the one part of the game that people love more than the actual game part. (More on that later.) Don't get me wrong, it's actually pretty good, what with the symbolism and complex character development; it's just that NOTHING HAPPENS FOR A LOT OF THE GAME. Like the original Silent Hill, this one consists mostly of the protagonist bumping into locations in search of some random girl in his life.
 
Also, I find the characterization a bit weird. No, not with that mama's girl or the dude somehow uglier than James, I get why they're that way; I'm talking about James himself. This guy is such a badass (not surprising, given that he's been to New England) that dead bodies don't surprise him at all. When I stumbled across a dead body early in the game, his first thought was, "Sweet! I found that apartment key I needed!" Keep in mind that I didn't even know that there was an apartment in the area, let alone that it required a key to enter. The only conclusion I could come to was that James Sunderland is psychic. Either that, or he's MacGyver. You see a piece of hair, James sees the string he needs for his hook. Hell, he won't even use certain items for anything close to their intended use, like when he drops canned juice down a trash chute when he has about nine other items capable of doing the exact same thing. Do not question this man when he says that he has no use for something.
 
Instead, question this game for why all the puzzles are so damn weird. I should've known something was up when the game gave me difficulties for both action AND riddles. It has an effect, and the puzzles it does touch do feel genuinely and fairly challenging (even if they do destroy the immersion); I'm not talking about those puzzles. No, I'm talking about stuff like the elevator puzzle. Wait, why am I calling it a puzzle? Late in the game, you find this elevator that gives off a harpy shriek when you step on it. Turns out it has a weight limit of one person. AND NOTHING ELSE. You literally have to get rid of everything to use the elevator, which is only understandable when you're dropping off a sword that would make Cloud Strife feel like less of a man, not when a photo summons harpy fury. The worst part is that it's an employee elevator, leading me to believe that the hotel is staffed entirely through child slave labor. Later on, you use a can opener to open a can of LIGHT BULBS. I swear that half the puzzles in this game require a FAQ of some type, which probably explains why this feels like a point-and-click adventure.
 
 *sigh* Another day spent shopping at Wal-Mart.
Except it has one thing that point-and-click adventures never had: combat.....that doesn't revolve around crappy insults. If it did, the enemies would be spouting things like, "Christ, you suck at beating meat monsters! You'd think you'd have mastered that shit over three years, you freak of nature!" Instead, they spend their time spouting World War II radio sounds. (OK, they actually don't, but things get REALLY eerie once you realize that.) It does a really good job of scaring you, due to several factors like the perpetual fog and darkness surrounding the town, and the fact that fighting them is a bit of a chore. Hitting enemies regularly works well, but trying to whack things on the ground is near impossible, which is probably why half the enemies decide that walking on two legs is overrated. I first thought that you hit things on the ground by dicking around with the right analog stick, but now I think you have to hold down the X button. I say "think" because James still managed to fuck it up half the time. Look, I know that vulnerability is a huge part of fear, but there's a difference between truly being weak and truly being unable to get your character to bash things on the ground.
 
Hell, now that I think about it, this game does know how to pull off the "vulnerability" card, but never in the right places. OK, there is one place: enemy numbers. Handling one enemy is fine, but two enemies will absolutely murder you. Once, I came across three enemies; I believe it was at that point that the game just cut away to a Game Over screen. Of course, I was killing things with my trusty Steel Pipe, so that may have been the problem. After all, the game gives you so much handgun ammo that playing this game legally makes you Charlton Heston, but you'll never need it all because melee weapons work fine. When I finally decided to use the firearms, I noticed one weird thing: reloading through the menu. Why do it in the real world when all that tension and fear is just a click away? And now that I'm on a rant on the combat, why are there so few healing items in the game? Wait, that's the opposite of a rant. Hmmm.....oh! Why do bodies jump out of nowhere on certain roads? It's not scary in any way, Konami, it's just stupid.
 
So I've managed to debunk A LOT of the stuff that should make Silent Hill 2 good, begging the question, "Why do people love this game so damn much?" Well, I believe it's because this game is a master of atmosphere (or it would be if half the doors weren't broken). The level of detail is amazing, the game gets progressively more insane as you progress, and there's a genuine feeling of dread and terror when you hear your radio go off, but can't see what's causing it to do so. The feeling of dread you can only get when you take a book into the bathroom to read, but find that it has a portrait on the cover, and you can't take a dump because it now feels like somebody's watching you. Just me? Fine, how about when you step out of the shower and realize that you have to give birth to a brown eel, bringing about a sense that you've cleaned yourself for naught, and that slight fear that you'll slip off the seat, somehow. Still me? Fine, ho-I can't find that Boondocks clip I want. OK, moving on, part of the success is that it doesn't muck things up with a HUD of any kind. Looking for your health? Not gonna find it on the screen. Look in your hands; just like marriage, the more vibrations you feel, the worse things are. For you, at least. But I can't survive on atmosphere alone! I need things to do, and "find out what you need to do" doesn't count as something to do. Same with extra endings. I only mention that because of how short the game is. Oh, wait, I've already mentioned that. What else, what else.....oh, Pyramid Head's pretty creepy, when he's around. He gets the game the Almost Scariest Thing Award. I say "Almost" because there are much scarier things out there, like Girl Beck, Satan Cl-
 


Ch...Chicken Head....How d...
 


Why is it so dark, and wh-
 


No....NO! N-
 



 

Review Synopsis

  • .........
  •  ......... 
  •  ......... 
 
 
 
 
...........
 
 

Spyro 2: Ripto's Rage

( I specifically requested against this music.) In fact, I'd have taken any other music available. In case you haven't caught on, this is the Queen, typing the rest of this thing after my husband made himself go insane. Forgive me for jumping straight into the blog, as I'm not very good at introductions. Also, I'm not acquainted with writing blogs, especially on video games I haven't played, so keep that in mind as you read this.
 
Anyway, Spyro 2, being the sequel to Spyro 1, should logically follow the story of that game, but for whatever reason, doesn't; Gnasty Gnorc (is that how it's spelled? That can't be it.) is out, and instead, you get Ripto, voiced by the man responsible for Jecht and many other game characters. Now that I look at the credits for this game, the production values for this game are pretty good: you have Tom Kenny doing a Billy West impression, an actual type of story, and it generally feels like a lot more effort was put into the game. Keep in mind that I don't say this exclusively for the story; just about everything, from the levels to the rest of the things I'll end up mentioning later on, feel like they've received a massive improvement from the last game.
 
 Oddly enough, Billy West did not do the voice for one of these dragons.
Take, for example, simply getting through the game. I can't tell you how it was done in the first Spyro, mainly because it doesn't look like it was ever consistent; you'd end up collecting all sets of items, hoping that you had enough of one group to make it to the next world or whatever. Not so in Ripto's Rage; talismans generally allow you to progress through the game, orbs unlock special levels (and regular levels at the end of the game, just to make the game longer), and gems allow you to buy new moves and levels and stuff. That last one doesn't count as making the game longer, as it never really sets the price so high that you need to collect more gems. You'll end up collecting all the gems you need in the levels, anyway, given how linear they seem to be. For the most part, levels are a straight line from start to talisman, orb requirements scattered along the way in little pockets you need not visit. I'm not insulting the game for being so linear, as it works just fine that way. What I will insult is the simplicity of the combat.
 
Not counting the boss battles for which there are FAQs I can pass off as a blog, all the enemies seem to die easily, their combat strategies being one-note (hit or flame, choose one). It's pretty disappointing, especially when you consider how complex everything else is. Instead of simply looking for the items you need, you have to do missions to complete them. One may consist of shooting down a bunch of spike-balls with a turret, another may involve rescuing baby turtles who are trapped in boxes, for some reason. There's enough variety to keep things from getting stale, and it's all executed well enough that none of it comes off as shoved in for the sake of being there. The best example of this is the collection of flying levels. Sure, they're not necessary, but so what? They still seemed fun to play, from what I've seen, and there's nothing wrong with them, at least on a technical level.
 
I could spend this final paragraph nitpicking the little flaws, like how the voice acting sometimes sounds like Avalar is code for The Matrix, or how it's too short and too easy, but instead, I'll complain about something greater: the power-ups. Each level has a certain power-up, like super-breath, super-charge, or super-get-launched-up-to-another-part-of-the-level. That's not the bad part; that honor goes to how you get the power-ups. You have to kill a certain amount of enemies, which is the only reason you'll ever do so. It doesn't even stay that way when you leave the level; you have to rekill the enemies each time you want the power-up....for less than a minute. Sadly, a lot of these power-ups last long enough just to confirm that they're there, probably to give it some artificial sense of challenge. Despite all that, Ripto's Rage is an amazing g-
 
Bushwald Sexyface said:

"Hey, King bloke, you kn-ugh. Why you wearing them fake booblies?"

...*runs away*
 

Review Synopsis

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  • ..........

Posted by HS21

Chicken head is all "The sky is falling, the sky is falling". Silly chicken head.

Posted by Video_Game_King
@HS21: 
 
No, he's all, "The sky will fall down and crush your pathetic skull, and I shall stand above it all and laugh." That's how fucked up he is.
Posted by HS21
@Video_Game_King: Man, chicken head is a dick. 
Posted by FunExplosions

Pretty awesome read. I am a huge childhood fan of Silent Hill, and even I didn't like Silent Hill 2. I got to the hospital or whatever, then just decided I hated it and never played it again. I still haven't finished Silent Hill 3... because the game broke... but that game is far better than 2.  Also, for one reason or another, I used to play Spyro 2 all the time as a kid. I believe I "100 percented" it like three times or something. You get some special fire breath and some amusement park level or something. Anyway, nice fun, quick read from the woman, as well.

Posted by Video_Game_King
@FunExplosions: 
 
Wait, you played Silent Hill 2 as a kid!? Were your parents Pyramid Head and Pyramid Head? Wow....Anyway, it seems you didn't get the twist I put at the end of the Spyro part.
Edited by FunExplosions
@Video_Game_King: 
Well, I'm 20 now, so if Silent Hill 1 came out in '99, then I was 9. And I played SH: 2 when it launched, as well.
 
And, ohhhhh, I get it. I just thought the end of the Spyro part was your "wife" turning around to see you with cups under your shirt, then she runs away from you. But now I see the light.
Posted by Video_Game_King
@FunExplosions: 
 
What type of woman is called Bushwald Sexyface? Also, this is what he looks like:
 

Bushwald Sexyface.


Posted by AlwaysAngry

I just can't beat Silent Hill 2! It's too scary!

Posted by luce

Pretty sure you need medication 
 
Btw @AlwaysAngry:  nice boobs

Posted by Make_Me_Mad

I believe the first time I played Silent Hill 2 involved hearing the radio going off, the camera shifting so that I couldn't see, but could still hear something coming at me, and me promptly shutting the game off and walking away.  The next try went better for me.  I agree that the pacing in SH2 was pretty weird most of the time, but at least they learned from it when they made SH3 all kinds of awesome.

Posted by Video_Game_King
@luce: 
 
I've tried that, but it doesn't work! Fuck you, M&Ms! Your peanuts do nothing!
Posted by FunExplosions
@AlwaysAngry: @luce:  Totally. I can't stop staring at them. How am I supposed to hate everything AlwaysAngry says when he's got such a killer rack?
Posted by Sweep

I used to really like Spyro for the PSX but after the first game, drunk with their success, the design team struggled to match it's initial brilliance.  I remember trying Spyro 2 and then walking away, disgusted. 
 
Keep em comin' VGK

Moderator
Posted by Video_Game_King
@Sweep: 
 
Really? Brilliance? This Spyro is definitely much better than the last Spyro. This one feels like it has a point, like, in general. I don't know about Year of the Dragon, but Enter the Dragonfly was a real downward spiral for the series.
Posted by Sweep
@Video_Game_King: Well I thought it was brilliant. It was a long time ago. I'm probably hallucinating on this nostalgia overdose.
Moderator
Posted by Jeust

Nice reviews! Did you like Silent Hill 2 ending twist? 

Posted by Yummylee

I don't see why so many people treasure SH2 is being one of the best. It's got a really clever story but the gameplay is freakin' terrible. The physics with that damn slab of wood is like trying to swat a fly with a toothpick.

Posted by Video_Game_King

  @Sweep: 
 
I've been there. Fortunately, I didn't OD with Earthbound; that would've been some crazy shit.
 
@Jeust:
 
 

 

Edited by Jeust
@Abyssfull said:

" I don't see why so many people treasure SH2 is being one of the best. It's got a really clever story but the gameplay is freakin' terrible. The physics with that damn slab of wood is like trying to swat a fly with a toothpick. "

Personally i treasure it, because like no game before it left me disturbed by the story. The only game that came close to that, was Silent Hill 4.  The array of emotions these games provided wasn't matched by any other. 
 
@Video_Game_King: ahahah 
Posted by Video_Game_King
@Jeust: 
 
True, it had a great story, but usually I like some gameplay with my story. That's why you see me humping Final Fantasy Tactics more than you do Red Dead Redemption.
Posted by Jeust
@Video_Game_King said:
" @Jeust:   True, it had a great story, but usually I like some gameplay with my story. That's why you see me humping Final Fantasy Tactics more than you do Red Dead Redemption. "
hehehe I like more the experiences a game provide, apart from frustration, and afterwards gameplay. Generally a mix of both, as i can't survive bad gameplay. SMT: Devil Survivor can attest to that, although it seemed a great game of the others fields. :p
Posted by Video_Game_King
@Jeust: 
 
I sometimes find that gameplay can be a part of the atmosphere. It certainly affects how you view the game. Also, Devil Survivor kinda failed in many other fields. The story felt like somebody Japan'd up some Dan Brown, the graphics/controls made you wonder why it needed to be a DS game, and it froze.
Edited by Jeust
@Video_Game_King:  
 
I agree, but i find it hard to encounter a gameplay that enhances the atmosphere.  
 
In the horror genre, Fatal Frame tried it, and while it succeeded it made the game more of a fps shooter in combat, taking the focus of the horror into killing ghosts. Fahrenheit and Heavy Rain also tried it and it ended problematic in a fair deal of ways. But there are games that succeed in it. Silent Hill Shattered Memories in the Wii for example, but the majority of games don't seem to pulled it off.  :)
Posted by AjayRaz

i feel disappointed because i don't remember that super powerup junk from Spyro 2. i spent a bunch of time in that game and i don't recall there being any sort of super powerups or something that enhance your fire breathing or gliding and etc.  
 
that's probably because the last time i played that game was like, ten years ago. i have it downstairs on the PS3 but i haven't touched it. i should probably do that before i get shot.  great read, VGK. 

Posted by bonbolapti

Understandably, Silent Hill 2 is one of the better games. Which says a lot for it's pacing...

Posted by Video_Game_King

  @AjayRaz: 
 
What the hell are you talking about? There was one in each level. Hell, a lot of the orbs revolved around those power-ups.
 
@bonbolapti:
 
Shit, really? Because I kinda liked the original better than this one.

Posted by bonbolapti
@Video_Game_King: Well I guess I can't knock people for that, because the first game is pretty fun. But you take the set-up of the first game and you get a good feeling for what Silent Hill (The town itself and what it means to the people that visit it) is all about with this game. It's just a shame that they really didn't divulge further with the later games.
 
Shattered Memories definitely brings it back to it's roots in it's own way though.
Posted by Video_Game_King
@bonbolapti: 
 
Of course it brings it back to its roots; it's a remake of the original, isn't it?
Posted by bonbolapti
@Video_Game_King:  :D you're a fast learner
Posted by Video_Game_King
@bonbolapti: 
 
Kind of a dick thing to say, since I'm THE KING.
Posted by Thordain

Funny that you mention shopping at wal-mart, mine offers $7 machetes....:)

Posted by Video_Game_King
@Thordain: 
 
Funny that you mention that, as Silent Hill 2 features no machetes at all anywhere ever.
Posted by Thordain

Clearly he should have gone to my local wal-mart. Us New-Jersians know how to fight off the demons of New England

Posted by Video_Game_King
@Thordain: 
 
Really? You think you can fend off New England? Take a look at this video:
 
 
 
 
Not even the Germans can fend off New England, and these guys spent 15 years perfecting the art of killing people. When that level of murder isn't sufficient, you're fucked.
Posted by Thordain
@Video_Game_King: Do not underestimate the New York-New Jersey area. As long as we have Leigh Alexander on our side, we cannot lose.
Edited by ZanzibarBreeze

I think you hit the nails on their respective heads.
 
I personally like the idea of Silent Hill 2's story very much; I've seen all the cutscenes, I'll read a ton of analysis material, but I've never actually beaten the game because it's too frustrating.
 
Also, the one major thing I pulled out of your review: you can do dogs in New Hampshire? EDIT: After checking the law books, yes, you can but only technically due to a lack of state law.

Posted by bonbolapti
@Video_Game_King:  And then, when you get older, you can be an astronaut!
 
jk jk oh ho ho
Posted by Video_Game_King

  @Thordain: 
 
I think you underestimate the power of New England:
 

  • Not even people from Massachusetts can say Massachusetts. New England is so powerful, that not even New England can defeat New England.
  • They have witches, that's bad enough.
  • This is Connecticut. Any questions?
 
@bonbolapti:

Wait, what?
 
@ZanzibarBreeze:
 
I don't know; can you do dogs without a penis? Do dogs have penises coming out of their anuses? What's the plural of anus?
Edited by ZanzibarBreeze
@Video_Game_King said:

" @ZanzibarBreeze:  I don't know; can you do dogs without a penis? Do dogs have penises coming out of their anuses? What's the plural of anus? "

That woman is clearly doing the nasty, Sir, even though she has a DARE t-shirt on. Also, I believe it's anuses. Anai just sounds too weird. 
 
EDIT: And if that's not what she's doing, then what the hell is she doing?
Posted by Video_Game_King
@ZanzibarBreeze: 
 
What about annum? Anai just sounds like a Japanese god, which is oddly completely appropriate.
Posted by ZanzibarBreeze
@Video_Game_King said:
" @ZanzibarBreeze:   What about annum? Anai just sounds like a Japanese god, which is oddly completely appropriate. "
I don't know, but that was pretty funny. :) Also: plenty of vagina/penis references in Silent Hill 2, but no anus references.
Posted by ArbitraryWater

As a Resident Evil fan, I'm pretty sure it's illegal for me to play a Silent Hill game without some sort of preconceived dislike. Nonetheless, if I were to actually expand my PS2 collection with more than the 6 or so games I have now, I would probably pick it up, even though I have a fairly low tolerance for horror. On the plus, I'm sure I could stomach the shittiness of the gameplay because of said RE experience.
 
 As for Spyro... I was a Nintendo bitch up until the wii and adolescence changed my tastes, so I never saw it as anything more than a game that wasn't as good as Mario 64 or Banjo-Kazooie. I'm probably still right.

Posted by Video_Game_King
@ArbitraryWater: 
 
6 games? Ha! I laugh at you! Behold my mighty...ele....I rented a lot of games in the past. And borrowed more. Anyway, I'm sure you could stomach the story, too, since nothing happening is about equal to a bunch of bad shit happening.
 
Depends on which Banjo Kazooie game we're talking about. It can kick the ass of pretty much anything after Tooie, since one's a 2D platformer and the other's a racing platformer that fails at both racing and platforming.
Posted by Thordain
@Video_Game_King: If Connecticut is just Borderlands then that makes everything easier. The locals will all be scared off by our not cel-shaded bodies. To them we will seem like demons!
Posted by Video_Game_King
@Thordain: 
 
Or they'll just laugh at your one-shaded bodies :P.
Posted by ArbitraryWater
@Video_Game_King: I actually prefer the original BK over Tooie. Not to say that I dislike it, but BT is a significantly harder and more complicated game than the first, which works against it in some ways. Meanwhile, I managed to 100% BK in 6 hours with the XBLA version. Yeah, I played that game a lot as a kid. Of course, both are better than DK64, which doesn't hold up nearly as well because of the egregious sins it commits in regards to collectathon gameplay and bad minigames.
Posted by Video_Game_King
@ArbitraryWater: 
 
Tooie was harder? Tooie made me harder, under the Phallic Scoring System. (Gotta keep up the sex jokes.) I thought the complexity made it better. As for DK64, I only remember that you needed to play a few games of Donkey Kong to beat the game, for some reason.
Posted by mylifeforAiur
@Video_Game_King:  I played SH2 on easy. The gameplay is atrocious but the story is magnificent. I've never played a game were the story and characters are so intricately laced with symbolism. I'd definitely check out Spyro 2 now, i liked the original a great deal ;)  
Posted by Video_Game_King
@mylifeforAiur: 
 
I only got some of the symbolism (Eddie is James' id, that deathbed scene, etc.), which is why you didn't really see me commenting on it. I think. I'm REALLY exhausted right now, having just gotten up. Anyway, go check out Spyro 2.
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