GOTY 2016 (Adjusted)

Same deal as the other "GOTY (Adjusted)" lists, found here (2013), here (2014), here (2015), here (2017) and here (2018). The idea is to build GOTY lists that are constantly in flux, ever adapting themselves to a new year's worth of catch-up gaming. Like the Borg, but for video game lists. With enough time I should be able to play through every 2016 game that piqued my interest and construct a list that ideally represents what that year meant to me in terms of games, but that wasn't going to happen on the year in question: too many full-price new releases, too little time.

With 2016 in particular, the year was absolutely packed with games I wanted to try out from every tier of game development, and even after making a lot of backlog headway in 2017 I feel like I've still only scratched the surface. In some ways it's a little worrisome: has the game industry grown so large that we're letting too many high-quality games from exceptional studios slip through the cracks? We can see that in a microcosm with the ongoing bloat troubles of Steam and how it frequently fails the smaller talented developers that go unnoticed, but even if we were to excise all the cheap asset flips and meme trashfires in our midst there's plenty that went ignored by the mainstream that year simply because they had so much to cover. Recognizing games years after the fact is why I make these lists, of course, but I can't help but feel a pang of regret that I left so many behind on the year in question - when my impressions and reviews may have mattered, at least to an extent that they matter at all - just because my time and cash is limited and I perhaps have a habit of luxuriating too long in games I'm enjoying (though I can't really apologise for that last one too much, given that it's usually the developers' intent). All the same, I suspect both this and 2017's Adjusted lists will remain mutable for half a decade to come, at least.

For reference's sake, my original 2016 GOTY list is here.

(Currently owned 2016 games to explore in 2018 and beyond: Brigador, Darkest Dungeon, Earthlock, Glittermitten Grove, Thumper, Unravel, Watch Dogs 2, The Witness, XCOM 2.)

(Currently unowned 2016 games I hope to check out in the future: The Banner Saga 2, BOXBOXBOY!, Exist Archive, I Am Setsuna, Mario & Luigi: Paper Jam, Paper Mario: Color Splash, The Solus Project, Trails of Cold Steel 2.)

(Extra note: This list is gigantic, so I'm only including appraisals for the first twenty. I've written about every game on here somewhere else on the site, though.)

[Up to date as of January 2021.]

List items

  • 2016 rank: 1

    2017 rank: 1

    2018 rank: 1

    2019 rank: 1

    2020 rank: 1

    ConcernedApe's delightful little farming sim hasn't left my #1 spot yet, though it might only be a matter of time. While I can certainly see the argument that it doesn't cover any fertile soil that Rune Factory and its ilk hasn't already tilled ad nauseum, the way its multiple moving parts offered a huge array of activities to do, all of which fed back into two central goals - the success of the player's farm, and the happiness of the townspeople - offers a dizzying level of gameplay variation and exploration, with only a strict daily time limit to mercifully keep it all in check. The game would almost be intimidating if it wasn't so good-natured. Heh, "good nature".

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: N/A

    2018 rank: N/A

    2019 rank: N/A

    2020 rank: 2

    Came to Tyranny fairly late, but like most recent Obsidian throwbacks I was blown away from its quality and how in-depth it could be, particularly its granular magic system. Being the agent of an indomitable villain and choosing your words very carefully when ousting the last of the holdouts was an intriguing dark subversion of the usual heroic formula, surrounding yourself with other agents of varying levels of psychopathy and immorality out of convenience and being cautious who to trust with your misgivings. Obsidian's also getting really good at letting you establish bases and working to expand them when you aren't following the story or just pottering around looking for shit to loot.

  • 2016 rank: 2

    2017 rank: 2

    2018 rank: 2

    2019 rank: 2

    2020 rank: 3

    Doom's less good-natured, but I certainly don't hold that against it. Reboots of older franchises sometimes falter because they either try to be too much like the original, which occupied its own place in history becoming slightly antiquated in the process, or it loses the original's spark in an attempt to gussy up the mechanics and style leaving little of what we loved about the original behind. Doom's a rare case that nails this balancing act, modernizing the old FPS franchise in so many vitally important ways while building its gameplay in a manner ensuring that - to get the most out of it - you have to run, shoot and strafe around at full speed like a mad goon, just as Carmack and Romero always intended.

  • 2016 rank: 3

    2017 rank: 3

    2018 rank: 3

    2019 rank: 3

    2020 rank: 4

    Dark Souls 3 is a strong third chapter to what may or may not be a trilogy, course-correcting some of the disappointments with DS2 while cherry-picking its many worthwhile advancements to the Souls blueprint to ensure a "best of both worlds" amalgam of the first two games and their moody goth cousin, Bloodborne. The Souls world is cyclical, as is now understood, with the same or similar kingdoms and fashions rising and falling over untold millennia. This is a sneaky way of allowing the game to pepper old favorites around, whether that's allusions to popular NPCs or similar weapon and armor types coming back around. It can feel a bit fan-servicey as a result, and one that lacks a strong personality to call its own, but it's definitely the most mechanically polished game in FromSoftware's unrelenting RPG series.

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: 4

    2018 rank: 4

    2019 rank: 4

    2020 rank: 5

    I considered, briefly, putting Salt and Sanctuary above Dark Souls 3 to indicate that it was the more important Souls-like from that year, but I eventually chickened out. What Salt and Sanctuary does is summon forth what was always a latent spacewhipper vibe to the Souls series by rendering the game in 2D. It's still as tough as ever, but now the player will frequently acquire traversal abilities with which they can backtrack for materials and items and optional areas that will be of great help for the challenging regions and bosses ahead. Of special note is the game's skill tree system, which helps to visualize ideal builds by putting weapon/magic skills and complimentary stat boosts for those skills on the same branch, as well as its equally clever sanctuary customization.

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: N/A

    2018 rank: N/A

    2019 rank: N/A

    2020 rank: 6

    Took a chance on this SMT/Fire Emblem crossover just weeks before its enhanced edition came out when everyone would be talking about it again. Perhaps one of the best times I've had with a SMT game outside of a Persona, with the showbiz personality and "sessions" system adding a lot to what was already a sterling foundation. I'm especially glad I didn't have to fuse and train a hundred different monsters; I could just focus on the main characters and figure out the best synergies to use. Even some of the musical numbers were catchy.

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: N/A

    2018 rank: N/A

    2019 rank: N/A

    2020 rank: 7

    I can be kind of a snob when it comes to games very clearly made in some edition of RPG Maker, chasing the highs of the 16-bit era without really innovating or adapting to the modern times. Ara Fell shut down those prejudices and then some, creating one of the most compelling and streamlined 16-bit JRPG ersatzes outside of a Zeboyd joint. Not only was every aspect of combat and development carefully considered, but the world was full of details and incidental wonders to discover. Definitely did not anticipate it becoming one of my favorites of 2016 after adding it to the backlog way back when.

  • 2016 rank: 4

    2017 rank: 5

    2018 rank: 5

    2019 rank: 5

    2020 rank: 8

    I wasn't quite prepared to put the time and focus into mastering each of Hitman's six locations, opting only for Paris and the tutorial maps in the end, but even with that small taster I think I got a substantial amount of bang (or stab, or blunt force trauma from a flying fire extinguisher) for my buck. Hitman's incredibly elaborate living worlds, which offer dozens of methods to assassinate a map's chief targets and any number of additional would-be cadavers, are like intricate dollhouses and dioramas: works of art on a purely mechanical level. Add to this some surprisingly intuitive controls given the depth of what you're allowed to do, and a great level of style and gallows humor, and it's definitely one of the slickest games of 2016. I'm grateful recent business troubles haven't deterred the developers from assembling future assassination toyboxes.

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: N/A

    2018 rank: N/A

    2019 rank: N/A

    2020 rank: 9

    A confident and exhaustive end to the Phoenix Wright saga (at least for now), throwing out every idea and feature the series has introduced during its long tenure. Moving most of the action to the vaguely Tibetan nation of Ku'urain, from which Maya Fey and her family obtained their spirit channeling powers, meant having divination taken from the final moments of the victim as a new unreliable wrinkle to deconstruct. I hope this series doesn't stay dormant for too much longer, since it's been nothing but high points.

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: 6

    2018 rank: 6

    2019 rank: 6

    2020 rank: 10

    While the fourth Uncharted game is a bit on the long side, Naughty Dog does some smart assimilation work here in enhancing the emotional core of its story by spending more time on interpersonal relationships of its characters, a tactic they developed in The Last of Us. Equally, it adopts that game's stealth mechanics to create a number of combat situations where the player can either ignite an all-out fracas or simply avoid conflict with enough patience and guile. Elsewise, the series is the same as it's always been: a mixture of suspenseful and perilous climbing traversal, chaotic gunfights that rely a lot on situational awareness, and high-octane water-cooler cinematic moments where you have a matter of seconds to complete what is esssentially an interactive cutscene. As I often say about formulaic video game series: while it can be a detriment to ongoing ingenuity, sometimes an audience wants what it wants and there's no harm in giving it to them.

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: N/A

    2018 rank: N/A

    2019 rank: N/A

    2020 rank: 11

    Visual novels are hard sells for those who like their games full of mechanics and interactivity, but Steins;Gate's circuitous chronology (lots of time-travel and alternative timelines involved) means a video game is a perfect medium for it, letting players browse their previous checkpoints to see where they might diverge from their current path. Steins;Gate 0 works as an "interquel" - to explain more would spoil both games - and focuses on many viewpoint characters at different moments, rather than the currently frazzled Okabe Rintaro (the sole protagonist of the first game). The game asks a lot of its player to keep everything straight, and I appreciate anything that respects my intelligence.

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: 7

    2018 rank: 7

    2019 rank: 7

    2020 rank: 12

    I liked DrinkBox's Guacamelee, though I realize that most of what I liked about it came courtesy of the colorful Lucha Libre artwork rather than the game itself, which despite a clever light/dark alternating feature had a few unfortunate balance issues and irritations. That style was retained for the studio's follow-up, Severed, which instead imagines a hostile Mexican-themed underworld as an old-school corridor dungeon-crawler, with a panoramic active battle system that often felt like spinning multiple plates simultaneously. The combat's frenetic, but the exploration was relatively serene, and that fluctuating pace and eerie look resulted in a more compelling journey than I was expecting.

  • 2016 rank: 5

    2017 rank: 8

    2018 rank: 8

    2019 rank: 8

    2020 rank: 13

    Inside's still rad. There are certain games that become blurrier the longer you spend away from them, which can make historical rankings like this a bit troublesome to compile, but even though Inside only took an afternoon to complete it was still unforgettable. That's largely due to the surreal way it concludes, of course, but the overall look of the game and the atmosphere it draws you into left an indelible mark. Games don't really need to be more cinematic - I've always felt they're able to stand on their own as an artistic medium with the unique experiences only they can offer - but Inside might be one of those games I suggest to a cinephile who's a little more skeptical of video games as an artform.

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: 9

    2018 rank: 9

    2019 rank: 9

    2020 rank: 14

    In retrospect, Mankind Divided had an interesting if slightly divisive concept for a follow-up to Human Revolution. The stakes aren't quite as high in Mankind Divided, though the world has certainly changed, and instead tells a more focused story about a burgeoning technologically-motivated sea of change that people are naturally apprehensive about. Sort of like the mutants of the X-Men universe, superhuman "augs" or those with augmentations are widely distrusted after the fallout of the previous game's big climactic tragedy, and it's kind of neat that a sequel would bother spending so much time cleaning itself up, or at least acknowledging the consequences, after some big "oh shit" moment from a prior game. I also thought the gameplay tweaks and power-up additions were generally smart and the central hub location of Prague was well-designed, and I probably spent longer with the game than most because it was a lot of fun to explore and loot between missions with some new traversal/hacking upgrades.

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: N/A

    2018 rank: N/A

    2019 rank: 10

    2020 rank: 15

    Though originally a 2005 release, the Steam version has been localized and updated for 2016. A game that is built to possess the spirit of the 1985 original, which was a precursor for the likes of Ys and The Legend of Zelda, Xanadu Next balances tough dungeon exploration with a growing interconnected map of locations which you revisit with access-enabling upgrades similar to an explormer. Though the combat is a bit on the slow side compared to its sibling series Ys, Xanadu Next's more methodical combat is all about jukes and counters. I really liked this package, as slightly antiquated as it was, and I have high hopes for the next Xanadu reboot, Tokyo Xanadu. (Also, Evildoer is a straight jam.)

  • 2016 rank: 6

    2017 rank: 10

    2018 rank: 10

    2019 rank: 11

    2020 rank: 16

    Indie games are so often interchangeable with fan games (which is more or less what the Japanese call them) because so many seek to homage and reference prior eras that people have a lot of nostalgia for. It's not so much that they want to replicate those experiences wholesale, just that people are naturally drawn to create works based on their major influences - games from their childhoods first and foremost - and these older models are a lot more feasible for smaller studios to make. Lumo was one of those rare situations where the era being directly homaged was one very close to my own heart, as a British 80s kid who wasn't so deep into the C64 and Spectrum ZX era but still had a foot in the British game development scene as well as partaking in that far more ubiquitous love for Nintendo and Sega. If an Indie developer wants to make more games based on the isometric puzzle-platformers Rare used to make - or, heck, some kind of modern incarnation of Dizzy the Egg - I'm all for it.

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: 11

    2018 rank: 11

    2019 rank: 12

    2020 rank: 17

    I'm probably a little harder on Picross 3D than most because as a perfectionist I really dislike the combination of "one mistake and you're permanently out of the top score" and "when the puzzles continue to get bigger and bigger, the chance of missing with the stylus by one pixel and hitting the next cube by accident increases exponentially". That said, Picross 3D offers a type of experience no other Picross can, and it becomes this incredibly satisfying pastime to shift that nascent sculpture around to hack off bits and pieces of it as you turn it into a blocky approximation of a penguin or a sofa or what have you. A few rule changes to avoid the above annoyances, and Picross 3D would probably be the perfect portable series.

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: 12

    2018 rank: 12

    2019 rank: 13

    2020 rank: 18

    "Cyberpunk Anime Cheers" is a hell of an elevator pitch, but VA-11 Hall-A manages to be the sum of all those parts, creating several concurrent storylines with the memorable characters that drift in and out of the titular near-future bar. The drink-mixing gives you just enough busywork that it doesn't feel like you're scrolling through several pages of dialogue (not that it would be a bad thing, mind) and it becomes a really lived-in type of world where you eagerly anticipate catching up with your regulars and seeing who or what else pops through those saloon doors. It's kind of weird that we don't see more dialogue-heavy adventure games based around tending bar.

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: 13

    2018 rank: 13

    2019 rank: 14

    2020 rank: 19

    Dishonored is this series that is part Thief and part System Shock, as they give you plenty of tools to complete your objective and then let you loose in a series of relatively compact open-worlds with which to hunt your marks. In Dishonored 2, it feels like they lost the plot a little bit, greatly expanding each chapter of the game and making it less about the targets but the dozens of little stories that you encounter incidentally. Sort of like being in a town in Skyrim, getting a mission to go to a specific dungeon, and just dropping by a whole bunch of other dungeons, mines, caves and temples that happen to be along the way. It made the game feel a little more bloated and rudderless than usual, but I also enjoyed just soaking in these elaborately designed urban environments and bizarre vaguely Moby Dick-inspired steampunk world. It's a remarkable game just in terms of how much content it gives you and the degree of freedom with which to explore it, but it might also just outstay its welcome a little bit. You know what? If the next Dishonored became episodic in nature like the above Hitman game, I don't think I'd be put out by that.

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: 14

    2018 rank: 14

    2019 rank: 15

    2020 rank: 20

    I've played my fair share of adventures with Lady Croft, so what I appreciated most about this minimalist puzzle game originally released for mobile devices is that it crystallizes everything I like most about the series and less of what I consider filler. In particular, it emphasizes environmental puzzles like levers and platforms, fighting enemies smartly rather than in gruelling battles of attrition, and actually making the treasure-hunting compelling by turning it into its own little incidental hidden object puzzle. Though it came and went, it was a game I was hard-pressed to say anything negative about.

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: N/A

    2018 rank: 15

    2019 rank: 16

    2020 rank: 21

    While it has some significant pacing and story problems, to the extent that it almost (almost!) feels like large parts of the plot were cut out and intended to be sold separately via anime movie spin-offs and DLC campaigns, Final Fantasy XV at least gets the combat right. Drawing from FFXIII-3's more action-oriented approach, the real-time element adds a layer of strategy around situational awareness and using your AI companions to their maximum effect as you warp around the battlefield and take down those that present the greatest danger. For as much as I was prepared to dislike the Entourage of Eos (which, weirdly, is also a planet in Mass Effect Andromeda), I grew attached to my group and how their conflicting personalities bounced off each other in a mostly gregarious manner. Few games with a lot of travelling really nail that on-the-road camaraderie.

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: N/A

    2018 rank: N/A

    2019 rank: N/A

    2020 rank: 22

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: 15

    2018 rank: 16

    2019 rank: 17

    2020 rank: 23

    I'm constantly impressed with the new ways Indie developers find to tell stories. Even if the basic mechanics are similar - the "walking simulators" are all generally first-person and lack too much in the way of interactivity, besides picking up the occasional note - there's always some new hook or in the way it delivers its story. In Firewatch's case, it was by giving you a radio and letting you and the cheerfully sardonic woman on the other side converse about a huge range of talking points you could come across on your travels, whether that was a note left in a supplies box or a particularly noteworthy bit of fauna. The game pulls a fast one with just how much control the player has over developing this central relationship - certain factors present from before the game begins means the game ends as it must - but they at least have the option of being a chatty cathy and going off the beaten path or just quietly getting along with the handful of objectives the story tosses your way. As the old adage says, it's more about the journey than the destination.

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: N/A

    2018 rank: 17

    2019 rank: 18

    2020 rank: 24

    I'm thankful this game exists, as Kotaro Uchikoshi's Zero Escape series was in danger of vanishing completely. I love the ever-present mix of alternative paths, morphogenetic fields, all that other pseudoscience, really gruesome murders, and - of course - the escape room puzzles. While it feels a bit amateurish in parts (the character models are a bit... inexpressive, and the puzzle rooms didn't feel quite as challenging or imaginative), exploring all those alternative paths in the game's big branching timeline made for a great brain-scrambling time regardless.

  • (Plague of Shadows)

    2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: N/A

    2018 rank: 18

    2019 rank: 19

    2020 rank: 25

    This placement is specifically for the Plague of Shadows campaign. Unlike Specter of Torment, which made some significant changes, Plague of Shadows feels closer to an expansion campaign featuring one of the erstwhile bad guys. It's a cute little tale that takes some liberties with Shovel Knight's mechanics, taking advantage of a new character's moveset to mix things up. As free DLC goes, it's a steal.

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: N/A

    2018 rank: N/A

    2019 rank: 20

    2020 rank: 26

    A noble effort to make the Minecraft formula work with a Dragon Quest setting, balancing the endless constructive potential of the first with the more directed RPG conventions and objectives of the second (though it's not strictly an RPG, as the protagonist never gets stronger except by having better gear). It looks and sounds delightful, as the hideous boxy look of Minecraft is made much more palatable here, but the game is unfortunately scuttled by a cyclic format that forces you to abandon all your creations and recipe advancements for each new chapter. I hear the sequel addresses these shortcomings, so I'm sure that'll end up a lot higher on its respective GOTY Adjusted list.

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: N/A

    2018 rank: N/A

    2019 rank: 21

    2020 rank: 27

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: 16

    2018 rank: 19

    2019 rank: 22

    2020 rank: 28

    No Man's Sky got a whole lot of guff for not delivering anywhere close to what it promised, but if one were to look at the spirit of the message rather than the ambitious list of features that the developers were enthusiastically pledging, you might expect a chill planet-hopping open-world adventure game with the xenobiological research, mining and crafting that represent the more scholarly and pacifistic pursuits of your average all-encompassing space trader sim. That's what I wanted to see, as someone who loved the animal photography side-quest of Beyond Good & Evil and wished Afrika had made it to Europe, and I think I walked away satisfied from the game despite the relatively low and unvaried amount of content. No Man's Sky feels like the kind of game that becomes better the more distance it gets from its maligned launch and the furor generated from same, as the developers keep working on realizing the vision they had in mind when they started.

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: 17

    2018 rank: 20

    2019 rank: 23

    2020 rank: 29

    Amanita just continues to make the most adorable little point and click games, and it warms my heart every time I play a new one. It almost feels like the opposite to how Indie adventure games have evolved in more recent years, with a much stronger focus on puzzles over plot instead, and I could spend hours on various screens trying to figure out what does what, whether there are any secrets, and if making this little guy down here in the corner fart every time I click on him is actually contributing anything besides more methane to the atmosphere. It reminds me of the many silly hours spent with Coktel Vision's Gobliins games, and how it's the type of adventure game that wants to surprise you and make you laugh even when you screw up.

  • 2016 rank: 7

    2017 rank: 18

    2018 rank: 21

    2019 rank: 24

    2020 rank: 30

    I fell off Let It Die a lot sooner than I anticipated when I put it on last year's list, but even as someone who isn't so keen on persistently online worlds that invite player on player aggravation - it's my least favorite aspect of Dark Souls, and one I'm glad later entries downplayed a lot - and roguelike models where progress is incremental (if any exists at all), I really liked the sense of humor, music and style of the game as well as its many small clever quirks like a post-floor report that shows you how you travelled across the map in real-time. While there are a number of Suda51 games that I probably wouldn't recommend none of them have ever been boring, and Let It Die is the Platonic ideal of what a Suda51 roguelike should resemble. As with most roguelikes, I respect its moxie and the systems in play, but I really don't have the patience to get all the way to its conclusion.

  • 2016 rank: 8

    2017 rank: 19

    2018 rank: 22

    2019 rank: 25

    2020 rank: 31

    I generally don't go for games that are style over substance, since I have more of a game designer mindset than a world designer one, but Headlander is a really fun time if you're just looking for references to classic 60s and 70s sci-fi. As a bodyless astronaut trapped on a space station filled with robots pretending to be people, it's equal parts silliness and subtle sci-fi body horror, not unlike Psychonauts. It looks gorgeous, has a brilliant sense of place, and some of the least frustrating spacewhipper "concessions" - which is to say, it marks every type of barrier and out-of-reach collectible on the map once you've seen them so you know precisely where to go when backtracking with new abilities. Given the huge number of Indie spacewhippers out there, you could do a lot worse.

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: 20

    2018 rank: 23

    2019 rank: 26

    2020 rank: 32

    It's reductive to call Abzu "Journey but underwater", but the way it hits several of the same beats feels fairly deliberate. And why not? Journey was an incredible game that very few people seem confident in trying to replicate: a beautiful and contemplative adventure that ostensibly builds itself around traditional platforming challenges but is really more about the empathy the player develops for the other players they meet along the way. Abzu lacks the multiplayer aspect, unfortunately, but is every bit the serene and exhilarating expedition.

  • 2016 rank: 9

    2017 rank: 21

    2018 rank: 24

    2019 rank: 27

    2020 rank: 33

  • 2016 rank: 10

    2017 rank: 22

    2018 rank: 25

    2019 rank: 28

    2020 rank: 34

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    2020 rank: 65

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: N/A

    2018 rank: N/A

    2019 rank: 56

    2020 rank: 66

  • 2016 rank: N/A

    2017 rank: 35

    2018 rank: 43

    2019 rank: 57

    2020 rank: 67

  • 2016 rank: 13

    2017 rank: 36

    2018 rank: 44

    2019 rank: 58

    2020 rank: 68