• 52 results
  • 1
  • 2
#1 Edited by Aegon (5846 posts) -

I haven't read any books that came out this year. Just a couple biographies and some fantasy from other years. What are some some books from this year that you'd put in your top __ list?

Edit: Oh, and I read one sci-fi book (Ready Player One).

#2 Edited by commonoutlier (136 posts) -

Wool - Omnibus Edition, by Hugh Howey. Technically the individual books came out the year before, so if that doesn't count, than it would be First Shift - Legacy...I just really love that series >__>...it has been a while since books have captivated me like that series.

#3 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -

America Again: Re-Becoming the Greatness We Never Weren't.

#4 Posted by BombKareshi (979 posts) -
Caliban's War
 
OK, so maybe it's the only book I've read that actually came out this year, but it's a magnificent read nonetheless.
#5 Edited by Aegon (5846 posts) -

@commonoutlier said:

Wool - Omnibus Edition, by Hugh Howey. Technically the individual books came out the year before, so if that doesn't count, than it would be First Shift - Legacy...I just really love that series >__>...it has been a while since books have captivated me like that series.

Yeah, that's funny. I marked it as "to read" on goodreads today. Sounds interesting.

@BombKareshi said:

Caliban's War

OK, so maybe it's the only book I've read that actually came out this year, but it's a magnificent read nonetheless.

I'm actually reading that dude's long coin quartet fantasy series. I might get to Leviathan at some point.

#6 Posted by liako21 (527 posts) -

John Maynard Keynes - Hyman Minsky

#7 Posted by GloomyTangent (209 posts) -

@Aegon: Wool's okay. Not super great, but way better than most of the self published crap that's out there on the e-book scene, and for that alone I give the guy props. Definitely not book of the year material though, imo.

#8 Posted by Karkarov (3291 posts) -

Weird, this thread made me realize I am in the same boat. I have read a number of different books this year but not a single one that was actually "printed" in 2012. That makes me a bit of an ass considering a friend of mine got his first book printed this year.... Well I bought it even if I haven't read it yet ;p.

Maybe should check out Wool. Only 6 bucks on the kindle...

#9 Posted by Aegon (5846 posts) -

@Video_Game_King said:

America Again: Re-Becoming the Greatness We Never Weren't.

Would it be weird if a non-American read that? (Don't bring up anything about "Lunarian origins").

#10 Edited by commonoutlier (136 posts) -

@GloomyTangent said:

@Aegon: Wool's okay. Not super great, but way better than most of the self published crap that's out there on the e-book scene, and for that alone I give the guy props. Definitely not book of the year material though, imo.

I would disagree, but I'll admit that I didn't read many books that were specifically published in 2012. But as you said, it's an opinion thing, and of course Wool won't be something everyone enjoys. For me, it definitely is on my favorite books list.

I would say, @Aegon, that the first book is free on Kindle, if you want to give it a preview. If you like it, I'd definitely recommend that you buy the Omnibus, but if not, then that's cool, too (and plus, you won't have had to spend money on it).

@Video_Game_King said:

America Again: Re-Becoming the Greatness We Never Weren't.

I definitely plan to read that eventually...was flipping through it in a book store recently, and looked like good ol' Colbert humor.

#11 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -

@Aegon said:

(Don't bring up anything about "Lunarian origins").

Why? They're pretty relevant in this scenario.

#12 Edited by Atlas (2457 posts) -

2012 is probably the year in which I read the most books in my entire life - and not one of them was from 2012. Because there are so many acclaimed books from many different decades that I wanted to read for various reasons, I haven't read any books released this calendar year. In fact, I would go so far as to say that there's probably only one ever that I actually read within the calendar year it was released - that was last year when I read A Dance With Dragons (the weakest book in the series? Maybe. Still a compulsive page-turner, and completely engrossing? Yup).

The books I have read this year are extremely varied, including a book written in the '40s (Nineteen Eighty-Four, brilliant and entirely relevant), a book from the '60s (Dune, utterly compelling), two books from the '80s (A Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy - hilarious - and Friday Night Lights - fantastic), and a three or so books from the '90s and '00s.

Ironically, I bought a Kindle late last year and I love it, I think it's a great device, but most of the books I've read this year were physical books. Annoyingly, I had many books on my shelf that I had always meant to read and didn't want to buy again in a digital format, so I just read the physical books. Also one book was a present from a relative who is not familiar with digital distribution at all (because she's my 91-year-old grandmother), and the book I'm reading at the moment (the thoroughly engaging historical fiction Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel) is a physical book I borrowed from my mother, who doesn't have a Kindle and has many many shelves of books.

#13 Posted by MarkWahlberg (4610 posts) -

I haven't had a chance to do much fun-reading this year, and as with everyone else what little I have read is older stuff. But the one book I do want to read that came out is Bring Up The Bodies, by Hilary Mantel. That might seem like an obvious choice what with it being a huge best-seller and winning the Man Booker and all, but I really like Wolf Hall and everyone I know that's read it says Bodies is better.

#14 Posted by TheHBK (5563 posts) -

Total Recall - Arnold Schwarzenegger.

#15 Posted by Apparatus_Unearth (3248 posts) -

So here's the deal. I don't read much. The only authors I ever follow are Stephen King and Chuck Palahniuk. Could somebody recommend something good from this year in the fiction world? Preferably horror but I don't mind what it is.

#16 Posted by GloomyTangent (209 posts) -

@Apparatus_Unearth: John Dies at the End and This Book is Full of Spiders. Spiders came out this year, John Dies at the End is older but also really great. If you like horror and/or irreverent comedy you'll love it.

#17 Posted by GloomyTangent (209 posts) -

@commonoutlier: It's not so much that I didn't enjoy it, I thought it was a decent, pulpy read and I plowed through it in a few sittings. But I thought that it was incredibly predictable, fairly derivative of sci-fi/dystopian tropes, and frankly only passably well written. When you've got people like China Mieville, Neil Gaiman, Haruki Murakami, Junot Diaz, and Dave Eggers (amongst many others) writing literature that's very clearly artistically constructed it makes it hard to hold a book that tells a good story in a functional, well paced manner (which I absolutely do) up to the same light.

That said, I think China Mieville is the only one of the authors that I mentioned who actually put a book out this year, which I haven't read. So for all I know, it may be garbage. I haven't had nearly enough time to read as I'd like this year.

@Atlas: I thought that the 4th book was way worse. At least things that actually mattered happened in Dance with Dragons.

#18 Posted by wemibelec90 (1839 posts) -

Most of the books I read tend to be a bit older, stuff I meant to read at some point but haven't gotten around to. I just read what interests me, not just stuff that's newer.

The only two books I can remember reading from this year are Ready Player One (which was fantastic) and Fever (which was god-awful). If I had to pick one, it would easily be Ready Player ONe.

#19 Edited by Xtrememuffinman (958 posts) -
#20 Posted by Sergio (2262 posts) -

I'm always amazed by people liking Ready Player One. That was the worst book I read this year.

#21 Posted by MariachiMacabre (7100 posts) -

I just bought Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power and it's fantastic.

#22 Posted by Mrsignerman44 (1100 posts) -
#23 Posted by captain_clayman (3328 posts) -

Penn Jillette has put out two books this year. Kind of about atheism, kind of just an autobiographical thing, they're pretty hilarious, and if you're interested you HAVE to get the audiobook version. far superior.

#24 Posted by AckbarTheGreat (419 posts) -

If you are interested in comics in any way or just enjoy a good retrospective book. I recommend "Marvel Comics: The Untold Story" It gives you a pretty good look at the writers and creators at Marvel over the years and all of the rises and falls the company has taken since its founding.

#25 Posted by TopSteer (677 posts) -
#26 Edited by GetEveryone (4458 posts) -

@Apparatus_Unearth said:

So here's the deal. I don't read much. The only authors I ever follow are Stephen King and Chuck Palahniuk. Could somebody recommend something good from this year in the fiction world? Preferably horror but I don't mind what it is.

No doubt you'll have read The Dark Tower, then?

Maybe you can answer this. I'm on Wizard and Glass at the moment (near the beginning, about 70 or so pages in), and as much as I'm enjoying it, where I've heard the series goes has really put a dampener on my desire to finish it.

Are the last 3 books worth reading, or does it become totally wrapped up in metaphysical bullshit? The impression I've got from other people is that King gave himself a massive task and fell apart at the seems a bit trying to finish it.

Edit: I should mention that I really enjoyed the first 3. Specifically, I fucking loved The Drawing of the Three.

#27 Edited by Aegon (5846 posts) -

@TopSteer said:

I'll just leave this here: Air Force Gator

Everything about that is bizarre, including those weird ass reviews. Airforce pilot aligator. Written by a video game journalist. Well reviewed. Described as "the best dumb thing ever."

Oh and here's another useful review:

I haven't read this book, and probably won't. That doesn't matter. This book is so good you don't even have to read it. More nourishing than a pizza sandwich.
#28 Posted by TopSteer (677 posts) -

@Aegon: Yep, so damn weird but it's pretty much exactly what I'd expect from Dan Ryckert. Another user review of note is by none other than Chris Kluwe, a punter for the Minnesota Vikings.

#29 Edited by Phyrlord (171 posts) -

@GetEveryone said:

@Apparatus_Unearth said:

So here's the deal. I don't read much. The only authors I ever follow are Stephen King and Chuck Palahniuk. Could somebody recommend something good from this year in the fiction world? Preferably horror but I don't mind what it is.

No doubt you'll have read The Dark Tower, then?

Maybe you can answer this. I'm on Wizard and Glass at the moment (near the beginning, about 70 or so pages in), and as much as I'm enjoying it, where I've heard the series goes has really put a dampener on my desire to finish it.

Are the last 3 books worth reading, or does it become totally wrapped up in metaphysical bullshit? The impression I've got from other people is that King gave himself a massive task and fell apart at the seems a bit trying to finish it.

Edit: I should mention that I really enjoyed the first 3. Specifically, I fucking loved The Drawing of the Three.

Funny, I’m actually on the last 70 pages of wizards and glass and at first it was a little weird to have Roland go into a story about his past so fast, but quickly it becomes extremely enjoyable and a very interesting look into Roland’s past and his relationships with Bert and Alan which are mentioned a bit in the previous books. I have thoroughly enjoyed it. It is very well written. I really enjoy king and have a lot of his books, but have chipping away at them as I can. I want to take on the stand and IT next year. Skeleton crew has some of the best short stories I have ever read.

I’m not sure where the rest of the story goes and I don’t want to know. I’m hoping for wind through the key hole for xmas before I continue. I have a feeling you’re talking about the Towers relationship with reality maybe? And how it dives much deeper into that? I’m not sure.

#30 Posted by gkhan (489 posts) -

I'm not done with it yet, but got damn if Bring Up The Bodies by Hilary Mantel isn't fucking amazing. If you haven't read Wolf Hall yet, I highly recommend you do so, it's one of the greatest books of the 21st century as far as I'm concerned, and so far the sequel isn't disappointing me either.

#31 Posted by GetEveryone (4458 posts) -

@Phyrlord said:

I’m not sure where the rest of the story goes and I don’t want to know. I’m hoping for wind through the key hole for xmas before I continue. I have a feeling you’re talking about the Towers relationship with reality maybe? And how it dives much deeper into that? I’m not sure.

Yeah, that's basically what I was getting at. I haven't had much spoiled, at all, but I'm enjoying the fantasy aspect of it and would hate for that to be totally thrown out at the arse-end of the series.

The flash-back of sorts that happened earlier in the series, where we see Roland 'graduate' was incredible, so I'm hoping Wizard and Glass matches that story-wise. I quite like the idea of taking a breather from the quest for the tower - or at least the group - as I assume I've read about 2,000 pages at this point.

Haven't actually picked it up in a year, so this was sort of testing the waters before I dive back in tonight.

I'd be wary of reading WTtK, though. It may be be chronologically in the middle, but require foreknowledge of what comes later in the series.

#32 Posted by McGhee (6075 posts) -

@Phyrlord said:

@GetEveryone said:

@Apparatus_Unearth said:

So here's the deal. I don't read much. The only authors I ever follow are Stephen King and Chuck Palahniuk. Could somebody recommend something good from this year in the fiction world? Preferably horror but I don't mind what it is.

No doubt you'll have read The Dark Tower, then?

Maybe you can answer this. I'm on Wizard and Glass at the moment (near the beginning, about 70 or so pages in), and as much as I'm enjoying it, where I've heard the series goes has really put a dampener on my desire to finish it.

Are the last 3 books worth reading, or does it become totally wrapped up in metaphysical bullshit? The impression I've got from other people is that King gave himself a massive task and fell apart at the seems a bit trying to finish it.

Edit: I should mention that I really enjoyed the first 3. Specifically, I fucking loved The Drawing of the Three.

Funny, I’m actually on the last 70 pages of wizards and glass and at first it was a little weird to have Roland go into a story about his past so fast, but quickly it becomes extremely enjoyable and a very interesting look into Roland’s past and his relationships with Bert and Alan which are mentioned a bit in the previous books. I have thoroughly enjoyed it. It is very well written. I really enjoy king and have a lot of his books, but have chipping away at them as I can. I want to take on the stand and IT next year. Skeleton crew has some of the best short stories I have ever read.

I’m not sure where the rest of the story goes and I don’t want to know. I’m hoping for wind through the key hole for xmas before I continue. I have a feeling you’re talking about the Towers relationship with reality maybe? And how it dives much deeper into that? I’m not sure.

Listen to the Wizard and Glass audiobook narrated by probably the best of all time, the late, great Frank Muller. It's amazing.

#33 Posted by D_Bones (365 posts) -

Read The Twelve by Justin Cronin recently. If you liked the Passage this book is just as good if not better. People should read if they enjoy the post-apocalypse and are interested in a different take on the whole trotted out vampire thing.

#34 Posted by Apparatus_Unearth (3248 posts) -

@GetEveryone said:

@Apparatus_Unearth said:

So here's the deal. I don't read much. The only authors I ever follow are Stephen King and Chuck Palahniuk. Could somebody recommend something good from this year in the fiction world? Preferably horror but I don't mind what it is.

No doubt you'll have read The Dark Tower, then?

Maybe you can answer this. I'm on Wizard and Glass at the moment (near the beginning, about 70 or so pages in), and as much as I'm enjoying it, where I've heard the series goes has really put a dampener on my desire to finish it.

Are the last 3 books worth reading, or does it become totally wrapped up in metaphysical bullshit? The impression I've got from other people is that King gave himself a massive task and fell apart at the seems a bit trying to finish it.

Edit: I should mention that I really enjoyed the first 3. Specifically, I fucking loved The Drawing of the Three.

Unfortunately I haven't been able to bring myself to get through The Gunslinger. Every time I try, I'm bored to tears.

#35 Edited by Phyrlord (171 posts) -

@D_Bones said:

Read The Twelve by Justin Cronin recently. If you liked the Passage this book is just as good if not better. People should read if they enjoy the post-apocalypse and are interested in a different take on the whole trotted out vampire thing.

The passage is one of the books I read this year. I had mixed feelings about it. The author has a bad habit of getting you heavily invested in characters for hundreds of pages and then just killing them off for no apparent reason or meaning to the story. And the ending blew my mind... I couldn't believe he didn't take it in the direction I thought he was going to and it was a HUGE shift with in like 1 paragraph from like pages upon pages of lead up.

@Apparatus_Unearth said:

Unfortunately I haven't been able to bring myself to get through The Gunslinger. Every time I try, I'm bored to tears.

I found the first gunslinger a little hard to read when I started. More so because it was confusing and left me with a million questions. The next books are FAR better and once you know a lot more stuff "The gunslinger" really clicks.

#36 Posted by Kieran_Smith5 (152 posts) -

@Sergio: how so?

#37 Posted by Sergio (2262 posts) -

@Kieran_Smith5: I think the thing that makes some people like it are all the references. I enjoy when a story or game makes a reference to geek culture, but the author lays it on thick and completely panders to readers. If you still like Family Guy's cutaway jokes, you might like this. The story isn't very interesting, it's poorly written, and completely predictable. I'm not even kidding about that last part. I knew x-item would be used by x-people and y-item would counteract it during the climax from the moment they were first mentioned in earlier parts of the book. The only near redeeming thing was that I had the audiobook narrated by Wil Wheaton - he's still better on Redshirts.

#38 Posted by Silvergun (297 posts) -

I think the only new book I read this year was Throne of the Crescent Moon by Saladin Ahmed. It was excellent and I hope he does more.

It comes out at the end of the month, but Cold Days by Jim Butcher ought to be excellent. The Dresden books never disappoint and given how Ghost Story ended, Cold Days has one hell of a setup for its story.

#39 Posted by Mushir (2389 posts) -

@Sergio said:

I'm always amazed by people liking Ready Player One. That was the worst book I read this year.

Completely agree. Man, that book was poorly written.

#40 Posted by MattyFTM (14433 posts) -

@Mushir said:

@Sergio said:

I'm always amazed by people liking Ready Player One. That was the worst book I read this year.

Completely agree. Man, that book was poorly written.

It wasn't the best written book ever, but the core story behind it was awesome. I can overlook some of the technical aspects of the writing if the story itself is good and has me constantly page turning. Ready Player One did that. As such, Ready Player One is one of my favourite books of the year.

Moderator
#41 Posted by Mushir (2389 posts) -

@MattyFTM said:

@Mushir said:

@Sergio said:

I'm always amazed by people liking Ready Player One. That was the worst book I read this year.

Completely agree. Man, that book was poorly written.

It wasn't the best written book ever, but the core story behind it was awesome. I can overlook some of the technical aspects of the writing if the story itself is good and has me constantly page turning. Ready Player One did that. As such, Ready Player One is one of my favourite books of the year.

My main gripe with the book was the atrocious amount of name-dropping of 80s pop-culture stuff. He uses several paragraphs to describe something like the DeLorean and then never uses it again. He tries to cram as much references as he can into this book, and often goes to cringeworthy fan-fiction-extremes. The second half of the book doesn't have as many references in it, and I think it benefits from it.

My other problem was that you never really felt that anything could happen to the main character, because he always had some kind of device or ability, which has never been mentioned or introduced in the book before, to get out of the situation or to help him accomplish his goal. It just felt like such lazy writing to me.

The premise of the book is intriguing and it tries to explore some interesting areas, but the execution was just not very well done in my opinion.

#42 Posted by csl316 (9515 posts) -
@TopSteer said:

I'll just leave this here: Air Force Gator

I'm actually curious if anyone here's read and been enriched by this.  I'm afraid to read it because my hype for it is so high.
 
 Author Dan's on our left.  "He's a fan of action movies and pro wrestling, a Guinness World Record holder, and dislikes most books that aren't Air Force Gator."
#43 Posted by stryker1121 (1591 posts) -

@GloomyTangent said:

@Apparatus_Unearth: John Dies at the End and This Book is Full of Spiders. Spiders came out this year, John Dies at the End is older but also really great. If you like horror and/or irreverent comedy you'll love it.

Book is Full of SPiders is leaps and bounds ahead of "John Dies..." I had a good half dozen belly laughs reading Spiders and this go-round Wong makes his characters compelling and actually sympathetic, which he didn't do with the first book IMO. Great fun and you don't need to read "John Dies" to get into Spiders.

#44 Posted by Zelnox (397 posts) -

The best book I read this year so far came out in 2011. It's called The Information and written by James Gleick. It is ambitious and inter-discplinary with some sections being a bit more technical, but also very well written. Your mind will glide through the chapters.

Currently reading Thinking Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman.

#45 Edited by Osaladin (2543 posts) -

@Mushir said:

@MattyFTM said:

@Mushir said:

@Sergio said:

I'm always amazed by people liking Ready Player One. That was the worst book I read this year.

Completely agree. Man, that book was poorly written.

It wasn't the best written book ever, but the core story behind it was awesome. I can overlook some of the technical aspects of the writing if the story itself is good and has me constantly page turning. Ready Player One did that. As such, Ready Player One is one of my favourite books of the year.

My main gripe with the book was the atrocious amount of name-dropping of 80s pop-culture stuff. He uses several paragraphs to describe something like the DeLorean and then never uses it again. He tries to cram as much references as he can into this book, and often goes to cringeworthy fan-fiction-extremes. The second half of the book doesn't have as many references in it, and I think it benefits from it.

My other problem was that you never really felt that anything could happen to the main character, because he always had some kind of device or ability, which has never been mentioned or introduced in the book before, to get out of the situation or to help him accomplish his goal. It just felt like such lazy writing to me.

The premise of the book is intriguing and it tries to explore some interesting areas, but the execution was just not very well done in my opinion.

I enjoyed it's premise, but I agree with Mushir on most of his points. It just felt like it tried too hard.

Wool was great, I was totally surprised by that book, picked it up because it was cheap, read the entire omnibus in a few days.

Also, I'm trying to find some good sci fi/space opera type books. I've read too many fantasy of late, any recommendations are welcome.

#46 Edited by hidys (1029 posts) -

@liako21 said:

John Maynard Keynes - Hyman Minsky

In all seriousness this is a book I've been meaning to get around to reading this.

#47 Posted by gaminghooligan (1483 posts) -

@csl316 said:

@TopSteer said:

I'll just leave this here: Air Force Gator

I'm actually curious if anyone here's read and been enriched by this. I'm afraid to read it because my hype for it is so high.

Author Dan's on our left. "He's a fan of action movies and pro wrestling, a Guinness World Record holder, and dislikes most books that aren't Air Force Gator."

saw that video today Dan never ceases to crack me up, I hope they have him on the E3 show again this year!

Online
#48 Posted by csl316 (9515 posts) -
@gaminghooligan His breakdown of Jim at the end was incredible.
#49 Posted by Sparky_Buzzsaw (6405 posts) -

@GloomyTangent said:

@Apparatus_Unearth: John Dies at the End and This Book is Full of Spiders. Spiders came out this year, John Dies at the End is older but also really great. If you like horror and/or irreverent comedy you'll love it.

Could not agree with this more. I loved John Dies At The End.

Moderator
#50 Posted by TopSteer (677 posts) -

@csl316: Well I've ordered it and it should get here Wednesday but yeah, I'm kinda with you, I doubt it will live up to the expectations.