The Problem With Community Podcasts Is...

Giantbomb is, arguably, a site built around a podcast. That's not me trying to belittle the site, I think it's awesome and i'm on here every day. A big chunk of the users are here because they either listen to the Bombcast or used to listen to the Hotspot. Don't believe me? Go check out the creepy Rich Gallup Shrine. The personalities attached to aforementioned podcasts are entertaining enough to warrant such a magnificantly large fanbase - and it's the persistence of said personalities featuring on the site that makes giantbomb such a cool place to be.
 

You are here because you want to know, specifically, what Jeff Vinny Ryan and Brad think. You value their opinions, even if you don't agree with them. The site needs to be here, to compliment the podcast, so you can access to these personalities as much as possible.
 
Whilst a forum or blog can give an anonymous person notoriety in the netherworlds of the internet, there is really little incentive to listen to the ramblings of a complete stranger. For a podcast, blog, reviewer to be successful there needs to be persistence. You can't just drop something into the internet ocean and expect it to make a splash. You have to prove that what you are putting out has value. The Bombcast had access to a huge fanbase that carried over from Gamespot. Podcasting is, basically, a popularity contest. It's a hard concept to grasp but most of the people out there don't actually care what you think. And yes, I'm fully aware I qualify for this revelation.
 
So how do you make them care?
 
A reviewer relies on the persistence of his or her audience to create a context in which the opinion can be placed. For example, I know I can trust Jeff's opinion on fighting games, though I would probably think twice before I condemned Super Smash Bro's. This is because I have been reading Jeff's reviews and listening to his podcasts for years. Its a similar familiarity that needs to be built up over a long period of time. You need to have more than one string to your bow, you need to build a fully functional internet personality which make you more accessible as a person. The Community podcasts you enjoy most will be the ones featuring people whose opinions you have already been made aware of and actually appreciate. 
 
After that you only have the slight issue of finding something to talk about which hasn't already been discussed to death by the multitude of other more professional podcasts in existence. Unless you believe you have a new angle from which to view a topic, sincerity is dull. So is your extensive opinion on MGS4. You know who i'm talking about.
 
Anyways. If you are determined to start a Community Podcast I wish you the best of luck. I know a lot of people would like to branch out into some form of audio. I just think a lot of community Podcasts fall at the first hurdle, despite being entertaining and funny, purely because there isn't enough awareness or enthusiasm from the potential fanbase.
 
But then what do I know. In the one episode of our podcast (did it even have a name?) we talked about racoons, oranges, transformers and batman. I think? It's a little fuzzy...
 
Thanks For Reading
Love Sweep
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Posted by Sweep

Giantbomb is, arguably, a site built around a podcast. That's not me trying to belittle the site, I think it's awesome and i'm on here every day. A big chunk of the users are here because they either listen to the Bombcast or used to listen to the Hotspot. Don't believe me? Go check out the creepy Rich Gallup Shrine. The personalities attached to aforementioned podcasts are entertaining enough to warrant such a magnificantly large fanbase - and it's the persistence of said personalities featuring on the site that makes giantbomb such a cool place to be.
 

You are here because you want to know, specifically, what Jeff Vinny Ryan and Brad think. You value their opinions, even if you don't agree with them. The site needs to be here, to compliment the podcast, so you can access to these personalities as much as possible.
 
Whilst a forum or blog can give an anonymous person notoriety in the netherworlds of the internet, there is really little incentive to listen to the ramblings of a complete stranger. For a podcast, blog, reviewer to be successful there needs to be persistence. You can't just drop something into the internet ocean and expect it to make a splash. You have to prove that what you are putting out has value. The Bombcast had access to a huge fanbase that carried over from Gamespot. Podcasting is, basically, a popularity contest. It's a hard concept to grasp but most of the people out there don't actually care what you think. And yes, I'm fully aware I qualify for this revelation.
 
So how do you make them care?
 
A reviewer relies on the persistence of his or her audience to create a context in which the opinion can be placed. For example, I know I can trust Jeff's opinion on fighting games, though I would probably think twice before I condemned Super Smash Bro's. This is because I have been reading Jeff's reviews and listening to his podcasts for years. Its a similar familiarity that needs to be built up over a long period of time. You need to have more than one string to your bow, you need to build a fully functional internet personality which make you more accessible as a person. The Community podcasts you enjoy most will be the ones featuring people whose opinions you have already been made aware of and actually appreciate. 
 
After that you only have the slight issue of finding something to talk about which hasn't already been discussed to death by the multitude of other more professional podcasts in existence. Unless you believe you have a new angle from which to view a topic, sincerity is dull. So is your extensive opinion on MGS4. You know who i'm talking about.
 
Anyways. If you are determined to start a Community Podcast I wish you the best of luck. I know a lot of people would like to branch out into some form of audio. I just think a lot of community Podcasts fall at the first hurdle, despite being entertaining and funny, purely because there isn't enough awareness or enthusiasm from the potential fanbase.
 
But then what do I know. In the one episode of our podcast (did it even have a name?) we talked about racoons, oranges, transformers and batman. I think? It's a little fuzzy...
 
Thanks For Reading
Love Sweep
Moderator
Posted by Sweep

Moderator
Posted by Sweep

they can still vote for us. shhh. Go write some 00sweep. Oh wait, you cant because you have all those really important things to do.

Moderator
Posted by druid42

One thing I think you should remember is that, generally, good podcasts will work themselves into the collective's podcast rotation, while the not so good ones will fall to the wayside (except for those made by people who are stubbornly persistent).  You bring up great points about creating a report with one's audience, but sometimes it's the pure entertainment value to which people respond.  Every podcast I've ever started listening to I went in with little or no assumptions or knowledge of the podcasters.  I started listening to Giant Bombcast only a few months ago, and somehow I had never heard of any of the contributors, but there was a distinct entertainment value inherent in what I was hearing on my mp3 player.  That's why I keep coming back for more.

Posted by DanielJW

I think if you want to start a podcast do it. If it turns out trash it turns out trash, who cares? If you get listeners more power to you, you must be doing something right. Besides, if it's something you enjoy doing why put a blocker on yourself because you don't think you're popular. All of them need to start somewhere, in some cases the might hit the ground running first episode, others might take a while, others may never get into a good spot. But I don't think a failed podcast is really hurting anybody, and if it's something you want to do I believe it's an endeavour worth making, you never know if people are going to like you or not.

Posted by Sweep
@DanielJW said:
" I think if you want to start a podcast do it. If it turns out trash it turns out trash, who cares? If you get listeners more power to you, you must be doing something right. Besides, if it's something you enjoy doing why put a blocker on yourself because you don't think you're popular. All of them need to start somewhere, in some cases the might hit the ground running first episode, others might take a while, others may never get into a good spot. But I don't think a failed podcast is really hurting anybody, and if it's something you want to do I believe it's an endeavour worth making, you never know if people are going to like you or not. "
I totally agree. I was just trying to think about what makes a podcast a success. But one of the main problems is people wont even give you a chance.
Moderator
Edited by damswedon

heres my advice.

  • if you make a community based podcast make it about that community fuck the business and news, make it about showing the awesome things that happens on the site, (like TGWTG.com's Transmission awesome)
  • also dont make it a 2 hour podcast to start off, yes make it longer if thats what the listeners want. but no-one wants to listen to some people they dont know talk for 2 hours.
Posted by Sweep

20 minutes. Thats where I draw the line for my patience/attention span.

Moderator
Posted by druid42
@damswedon said:
  • also dont make it a 2 hour podcast to start off, yes make it longer if thats what the listeners want. bun no-one wants to listen to some people they dont know talk for 2 hours.
"
I agree.  I start to get antsy after about 75 minutes of a podcast.  I want to know what you've been playing and what you think about those games.  I don't want to know about how your uncle is still playing that SNES you gave him fifteen years ago and how he still moves the controller up and down when trying to jump--okay, maybe that can be entertaining.  However, my point is that unless the "filler" is entertaining, it probably shouldn't be in there.
Posted by Tylea002
@Sweep: I remember that podcast. Good times. I was laughing on the bus.
 
What makes a podcast a success though? Money. Simple as. You need decent equipment, and you need a guaranteed audience. Thus why established game websites, and established radio and television companies etc. have the "best" podcasts. You need that polish and audience you can get from money. However, you can have what happened to gamespot happen, which is after the people got hooked to their fave sites podcast, they developed "relationships" with the opinions of those on it. All the people then leave in a short time period, meaning that very quickly, what you love has morphed into something new. Then loyalty carries over, and you follow the people who you like to listen to. To actually break into the podcasting scene at the moment you need something more than a rockband mic and skype, you need some money and a plan. A realistic one. If you know your limits, know your audience and know what makes you unique, you can still break into the scene at the moment. But never become greedy or overambitious.
 
Just my two...pennies.
Posted by MattBodega

OH, YOU!

Posted by DanielJW
@Sweep said:
" @DanielJW said:
" I think if you want to start a podcast do it. If it turns out trash it turns out trash, who cares? If you get listeners more power to you, you must be doing something right. Besides, if it's something you enjoy doing why put a blocker on yourself because you don't think you're popular. All of them need to start somewhere, in some cases the might hit the ground running first episode, others might take a while, others may never get into a good spot. But I don't think a failed podcast is really hurting anybody, and if it's something you want to do I believe it's an endeavour worth making, you never know if people are going to like you or not. "
I totally agree. I was just trying to think about what makes a podcast a success. But one of the main problems is people wont even give you a chance. "
It was slightly more of a response to Mooseman's comment on the amateur thing. And you are right though getting noticed is a tough part, not only that though getting noticed and then holding the attention you get. I'm sure it's a tough thing to do, but you never no until you try.
Posted by Sweep
@MattBodega: OH WELL LOOK WHO IT IS, KING OF THE WALRUSES HIMSELF! YOU CANT JUST WALTZ IN HERE LIKE YOU OWN THE PLACE OPPRESSING PEOPLE WITH YOUR BIGOTED VIEWS ON METAL GEAR SOLID AND PIKMIN AND ALL THE OTHER INNOCENT VIDEOGAMES.
 
You ought to be ashamed.
Moderator
Posted by Fallen189

Nobody cares about them. If I wanted to listen to stuff like that I'd go to a manga cafe or anywhere people congregate and listen to them talk.

Posted by Sweep
@Fallen189: I love the fact that you think a Manga Cafe is the centre of the social world :D
Moderator
Posted by Otacon

Yeah I agree but if someone is serious about a podcast they have to start somewhere, and if not, the podcast probably remains interesting to the small amount of people who 'know' the host.

Posted by CitizenKane

Screw Moose/Sweep.  I'm voting for Hamz/MB.

Edited by Fallen189
@Sweep said:

" @Fallen189: I love the fact that you think a Manga Cafe is the centre of the social world :D "

Because that's exactly what I said isn't it dickhead.
 
It was just the first thing I popped into mind. What would you prefer I say? I would say something like "A library" or "University grounds" but I didn't think you were old enough to know what they meant.
 
So enlighten me, where do all the video game "PLAYERS" hang around where you live? The sandbox?
 
Edit: Oh you're from London. I get it now.
Posted by crusader8463

I only listen to podcasts when i have a game i can tune out and grind with like an MMO. Since i gave up all the MMO's going and cant find any joy out of them, i haven't listened to any podcast in awhile. I just don't have the attention span to listen to people talk unless i can be doing something else at the same time.

Posted by RHCPfan24

Yeah, I do agree with you there, Sweep. Not only do community podcasts usually suffer from the lack of familiarity with the hosts, I must say, the voices the people have usually turn me off. I am not going to point anyone out here, but I don't really want to listen to a bunch of mid-teens (I am one myself, don't worry) talk about stuff that can be easily displayed on a message board or IRC.  I don't have anything against anyone here and I commend everyone on their efforts but, I must say, community podcasts usually aren't my thing. Will I guest on one if I have the chance? Sure, possibly. But I wouldn't run a full-length one.
 
Also, the deep (somewhat sexy lol) voices of the Bombcast crew usually fool my parents into them thinking I am listening to NPR or Howard or something like that. Well, when Jeff screams something like "I Love Boobies" that blows my cover. But that still does fit with Howard....

Edited by ArbitraryWater

A friend and I once tried to do a podcast. After realizing that we had nothing to talk about and how totally boring we were , we gave up. I assume this is what most fan podcasts are like, except without the giving up part.

Posted by Sweep
@Fallen189 said:
" @Sweep said:

" @Fallen189: I love the fact that you think a Manga Cafe is the centre of the social world :D "

Because that's exactly what I said isn't it dickhead.  It was just the first thing I popped into mind. What would you prefer I say? I would say something like "A library" or "University grounds" but I didn't think you were old enough to know what they meant.  So enlighten me, where do all the video game "PLAYERS" hang around where you live? The sandbox?  Edit: Oh you're from London. I get it now. "
Ouch, a little jumpy today aren't we? If you are prepared to slow down a notch I didn't actually mean anything offensive. This outburst makes you look like a child, which is fantastically ironic :D
 
And, for whatever significance you seem to think it holds, I don't live in London, chump.
Moderator
Posted by JamesF

You just really make me miss Rich :(

Posted by Pie
@Sweep said:
" @Fallen189 said:
" @Sweep said:

" @Fallen189: I love the fact that you think a Manga Cafe is the centre of the social world :D "

Because that's exactly what I said isn't it dickhead.  It was just the first thing I popped into mind. What would you prefer I say? I would say something like "A library" or "University grounds" but I didn't think you were old enough to know what they meant.  So enlighten me, where do all the video game "PLAYERS" hang around where you live? The sandbox?  Edit: Oh you're from London. I get it now. "
Ouch, a little jumpy today aren't we? If you are prepared to slow down a notch I didn't actually mean anything offensive. This outburst makes you look like a child, which is fantastically ironic :D And, for whatever significance you seem to think it holds, I don't live in London, chump. "
Yeah, he lives in liverpool FOOL
Posted by Sweep
@Pie: (Wiltshire)
Moderator
Posted by Sweep

The problem with community podcast is people have more fun making them than other people do listening to them.

Moderator
Posted by Pie
@Sweep said:
" The problem with community podcast is people have more fun making them than other people do listening to them. "
Is that a problem though?
Edited by Mister_Gale

Great read and an interesting take on community podcasting. As much as I would like to believe otherwise, a lot of the observations made are dead on. Getting people to value an opinion enough to listen to 1 to 2 hours of it is quite a feat even with good content. The irony, of course, is that my comrades and I are about to start a podcast for a video games society in the University of Surrey (UK). Whilst not the exact same thing as a community podcast, I feel we are starting for an even worst position. Getting uni students to do anything, let alone paid attention to one of their peers, is nay on impossible unless their asses are on the line. Couple with that the fact that whatever we do is self funded and you begin to see my position.  

 Yet, this still does not faze me as it should. Some would say I am completely unrealistic to the success of my endeavour; however it isn’t success I am after. It is all about having some fun, with some friends and enjopying it. If people enjoy it as much as we do, I will invite them to take part. It is still a ways off yet, with the Blue snowball arriving next month and me having little experience with audio software and none with RRS feeds, but I am confident it will come together none the less (and any tips or help wouldn't  go amiss aswell)

Posted by Video_Game_King

Hmm, cool advice that I could possibly apply to my blog, sort of.

Posted by PenguinDust

If you decide to make a podcast, please, dear God, take the time and EDIT the podcast.  So many start up podcasts believe all they have to do is chat for a couple of hours and release the tapes on the web for instant success.  And it's not just awkward pauses and dead air that need to be edited out, but long stray conversations from the topic, parts where people are talking over each other, and giggling fits.  Also remember, a podcast should strive for broadcast quality which means don't treat the format the same as any old lunchroom conversation with friends.  There is a difference.  No one want to hear someone they have no affinity with talk about their class schedule, that their cat spit up a hairball, or how their parents suck.  If you can stay on topic, speak professionally, and edit the show down to what is actually entertaining, then you've got as good a shot as anyone.  Good luck.

Posted by LordAndrew

I really didn't know the HotSpot crew very at all when I started listening. It's something you get accustomed to over time. But of course, a podcast needs to be good enough to keep people coming back, so that they can learn more about the hosts.
 
So I think sometimes it's good to listen to a podcast that may not be all that great, and provide feedback. A podcast can improve with help from its listeners, and hopefully draw in more listeners as a result.
 
@PenguinDust said:

" If you decide to make a podcast, please, dear God, take the time and EDIT the podcast.  So many start up podcasts believe all they have to do is chat for a couple of hours and release the tapes on the web for instant success.  And it's not just awkward pauses and dead air that need to be edited out, but long stray conversations from the topic, parts where people are talking over each other, and giggling fits.  Also remember, a podcast should strive for broadcast quality which means don't treat the format the same as any old lunchroom conversation with friends.  There is a difference.  No one want to hear someone they have no affinity with talk about their class schedule, that their cat spit up a hairball, or how their parents suck.  If you can stay on topic, speak professionally, and edit the show down to what is actually entertaining, then you've got as good a shot as anyone.  Good luck. "
Having recently recorded a segment for Bomb Should Have a Face, I know exactly what you're talking about. The awkward pauses, wild tangents, people talking over each other, giggling fits; it was all there. And all that stuff has to be edited out. I had a lot of fun doing it, but no one wants to listen to stuff like that. Before that I thought, yeah, you could just get some people together and record a podcast for a few hours, and then toss it up when it's done. But after recording my segment I realized it's really not that easy. Podcasting is fucking hard. It's no wonder so many fail after only a few episodes.
Posted by mracoon

I've only listened to a GB community podcast once (I think it was BSHAF but I'm not sure) and it didn't really grab my attention. Partly because I didn't really know any of the people on it and partly because they were just talking about stuff that I'd already heard on other podcasts with people who knew more about it.

Moderator
Posted by RHCPfan24
@Pie said:
" @Sweep said:
" The problem with community podcast is people have more fun making them than other people do listening to them. "
Is that a problem though? "
Not necessarily but it does not create many listeners which, in turn, doesn't create a podcast or a long-lived one at least. Still, no shame in having pride in one's work.
Posted by Rowr

I think the best way to go about it is just to enjoy talking with a group of people. If you can put it out and people enjoy it, well yay.

Edited by PureRok
@Sweep: I don't listen to the podcast, I hardly watch the videos, and I don't read the reviews. Why am I here?
Posted by Apathylad

I wouldn't mind being on a podcast, although I'd be concerned that I'd be just as disruptive and reprimanded for it like Leigh Alexander was in her Bombcast appearance. :P

Posted by Breadfan
@Sweep said:
The problem with community podcast is people have more fun making them than other people do listening to them.
I was involved in a podcast last year that had a small following of about 50 listeners and we had a blast making it, but the payoff just wasn't worth it.
Edited by tokyochicken

I've thought about this for a long time,  it's been an issue I've personally had to work with. A community podcast works, there are examples of good community podcasts out there, go to Bitmob.com and check out the Pixel Revolt podcast.

One complaint that bothers the all living fuck out of me is the people who go out and say, "Why do I want to listen to some random douchebag's opinion? I'd rather listen to Garnett Lee!" or something to that degree. A lot of these journalists we listen to today were once just dudes on a forum or irc writing amateur reviews and blogs. Hell Andrew Pfister was some guy in an irc channel who made friends with the right people. When it comes to an amateur podcast I try to be open minded to things, even if you don't work for any professional outlet you might have something interesting to say. Again, I point you to Bitmob.com, they have many unknown bloggers/podcasters who have some really interesting opinions.
 
One thing I've learned from my experience trying to produce a community podcasts: Holy sweet god it is fucking hard. Apart from just trying to deal with audio quality mishaps, it's difficult to actually "Make a podcast about the community", because when you boil it down it's still just 4 dudes talking about stuff, not having much community involvement. I tried my hardest to figure this out with Bomb Should Have a Face back in the day when I was "Schedule Producer", if you grab interesting community blogs from the site to talk about then people get pissed off because then it becomes a bunch of guys talking about the economy or whatever, but then if you go into more community happenings it begins to sound dry, that is if you cast of people lack some level of chemistry. There's a fine line that could be easily crossed when it comes to these type of podcasts.
 
Also I don't think you need to be known in the industry to be interesting , you could be completely unknown and still grab an audience if you do the rights things with a podcast. Most people will gravitate to a group of people with strong chemistry, a lot of times it doesn't even really matter what people talk about as long as the cast works together really well. Look at GFW for example. I think the community podcast things works just fine, it just takes a lot of polish. You could talk about the same old bullshit as everyone else as long as you're having fun doing it, that kind of thing resonates to people.
 
tl;dr: It just takes a lot of work, and have fun with it, people will come.

Posted by KillaMaStA

I think that you have a valid point in that theres really no use in having a podcast if you dont have anything new to bring to the table.
 
Video game websites have podcasts because they get more information than the regular guy and hearing them discuss what they saw is informative to people. The same is with game companies. So if you only know what you read on giantbomb then why should I care about your podcast? If people have opinions they could just as easily write them down on a blog or forum topic instead of going through the trouble of making a podcast.
 
I am not going to say that you are wasting your time but I just dont see how a  "Community podcast" could be as widely successful as the Giant Bombcast. Unless it was really funny, then perhaps it could find a different audience.But at that point the fact that its about videogames becomes secondary. What about a podcast about the community? Or maybe the internet as a whole? In order to suceed you need to bring something to the table that isnt already there.
I read forum topics sometimes and I start to wonder, "Why am I reading this?" "I dont actually care what this guy has to say". Which ends in me asking myself what the hell im even doing here. I dont know if anyone here actually wants my opinion on this and they probably dont.
 
But back to the topic at hand. Should "community podcasts" even exist? In the end, It really doesent matter if all the people involved enjoy what their doing and atleast someone listens to it. Maybe people just have nothing better to do and this is just a fun way to spend their free time.
 
The bombcast began as basically the Jeff Gerstmann show didint it? At the time people were crazy interested in anything that he did and so the Podcast was a success and gained a fanbase and then it could evolve into a podcast about videogames. But if your just coming out of the deep abyss of the internet and nobody has heard of you your chances of making it are very slim. I believe that the initiative should be from the people but again, If you wanna do it then go for it.

Posted by Lies
@PureRok said:
" @Sweep: I don't listen to the podcast, I hardly watch the videos, and I don't read the reviews. Why am I here? "
The hentai game pages.
Posted by LordAndrew
@Lies: That's the real reason we're all here.
Posted by natetodamax

I agree that Community Podcasts fail to be as entertaining as the Bombcast because they are less professional. I love listening to the Bombcast because Ryan, Vinny, Jeff, and Brad (Giant Bomb!) (cookie for reference) know their stuff, and I'd much rather listen to that instead of a couple of high schoolers over Skype.

Posted by FluxWaveZ

The only official podcast that I think is horrible to listen to is the Joystiq Podcast.  They're jokes are almost never funny, and when they are it's because of Ludwig, they never edit their shit and constantly joke about that fact, they have a lot of difficulty detecting sarcasm in an email, which results in them making fun of that person even though that person is obviously joking and it's just really bad for the most part compared to others.  They're even worse than Noobtoob, who at least have personality. 
  
The stupidest reason you could come up with for not listening to a community podcast is because it contains people you don't know/high schoolers.  That's not what's important.  The personalities of the podcasters and the flow of the podcast itself are the most important, the features too.  I have not listened to any community podcasts, but my guess is that they regurgitate information that was already said on the official podcasts, and by people who actually work in the industry. 
 
I would just like the official Giant Bombcast to acknowledge the community more and not only by emails.  They should quote various comments that were posted on the boards like those in Listen Up and Rebel FM do (Garnett Lee is especially great when doing this.  He frequently quotes comments that people have made on 1up and NeoGAF in the appropriate contexts).  Maybe they could talk about the results on official weekly polls that they could post on the site, commenting why people chose one side or the other to add to points they could make during those discussions.
Online
Posted by Sweep
@FluxWaveZ said:
" I would just like the official Giant Bombcast to acknowledge the community more and not only by emails.  They should quote various comments that were posted on the boards like those in Listen Up and Rebel FM do (Garnett Lee is especially great when doing this.  He frequently quotes comments that people have made on 1up and NeoGAF in the appropriate contexts).  Maybe they could talk about the results on official weekly polls that they could post on the site, commenting why people chose one side or the other to add to points they could make during those discussions. "
I disagree. The Giantbomb staff are part of the community. If they see something worth noting then they will reply on the forums or in a feature article. Thats the point of having a site as well as a podcast. I don't want two hours of Jeff reading out forum posts. I want videogame news filtered through the cynically experienced brain of Ryan Davis and served with a healthy dose of sarcasm.
Moderator
Posted by Jayge_

The problem with community podcasts (I think) actually stems from the fact that nobody really uses their real names. It's just... weird. You can't have a real attempt at a podcast while using your random net handles. It just doesn't work. 
 
"Hi, my name is Systech." 
 
"I'm Coltonio." 
 
"Our guest is Arthur Gies." 
 
(Sorry to pick on my bestest buddies) 
 
It just doesn't work.

Posted by Coltonio7
@Jayge said:
" The problem with community podcasts (I think) actually stems from the fact that nobody really uses their real names. It's just... weird. You can't have a real attempt at a podcast while using your random net handles. It just doesn't work.  "Hi, my name is Systech."  "I'm Coltonio."  "Our guest is Arthur Gies."  (Sorry to pick on my bestest buddies)  It just doesn't work. "
Dude, we're fixing that. It's mostly habit though, as when I talk to Systech I call him Systech...not Andrew.
 
Also, Minor Issues is the best podcast ever.
Edited by Claude

I don't have time to listen to the Bombcast, so good luck to everyone that tries, plus after only starting to listen to podcasts last year, they seem boring. I just quit listening. I might catch a special podcast every once in a while. Maybe they're for the younger crowd.

Edited by FluxWaveZ
@Sweep said:

" @FluxWaveZ said:

" I would just like the official Giant Bombcast to acknowledge the community more and not only by emails.  They should quote various comments that were posted on the boards like those in Listen Up and Rebel FM do (Garnett Lee is especially great when doing this.  He frequently quotes comments that people have made on 1up and NeoGAF in the appropriate contexts).  Maybe they could talk about the results on official weekly polls that they could post on the site, commenting why people chose one side or the other to add to points they could make during those discussions. "

I disagree. The Giantbomb staff are part of the community. If they see something worth noting then they will reply on the forums or in a feature article. Thats the point of having a site as well as a podcast. I don't want two hours of Jeff reading out forum posts. I want videogame news filtered through the cynically experienced brain of Ryan Davis and served with a healthy dose of sarcasm. "
Personally, I have not seen that many posts on the forums by the Giant Bomb staff.  I believe those at 1up also contribute a lot to the forums, especially people like Tina Sanchez.  They do that while having 2 podcasts (Good Grief and Listen Up)  that also refer to many community-oriented things such as blogs, comments, polls or anything major in the 1up community.  Noobtoob also are very much into community participation and they do stuff like MMO community invasions and game nights (game nights with the community are also done by the 1up staff and I think Eat-Sleep-Game have done that too).  These people also post a lot on the forums.
 
With these comparisons, I can't possibly see how Giant Bomb is more integrated with the community compared to these other sites.
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Posted by Jayge_
@Coltonio7 said:
" @Jayge said:
" The problem with community podcasts (I think) actually stems from the fact that nobody really uses their real names. It's just... weird. You can't have a real attempt at a podcast while using your random net handles. It just doesn't work.  "Hi, my name is Systech."  "I'm Coltonio."  "Our guest is Arthur Gies."  (Sorry to pick on my bestest buddies)  It just doesn't work. "
Dude, we're fixing that. It's mostly habit though, as when I talk to Systech I call him Systech...not Andrew.  Also, Minor Issues is the best podcast ever. "
I didn't mean that you were the worst offender ever, it's just a good example because you guys are great at getting some pretty big guests on the show. It's like a symbol for the incredibly awkward gap between forum-goer and industry "professional."
Posted by Systech

I agree with you completely, Sweep. Putting together a podcast is a lot of hard work. The one I am working on is straying away from being a community podcast and has for some time now and realized this during the decline of BSHAF. We have tried to use our real names for a few episodes as well. Just because some community members are making a podcast doesn't mean it's a community podcast, though. I also don't know why we're getting picked on for having someone on the podcast that wasn't a community member or Giant Bomb staff.

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