Anime Suggestions?

I consider myself a casual anime fan. I enjoy the obvious mainstream ones like Dragon Ball(Z)(GT), Full Metal Alchemist, Pokemon and Cowboy Bebop, but I don't venture out of really popular anime like those.
 
My favorite anime is probably Great Teacher Onizuka, though. It's a comedy anime with a high school setting. Does anyone have any anime that are similar to that, a very funny anime with a realistic setting? 
 
Also:  

  • Don't say Naruto.
  • Anything with naked cartoon pussy is welcome.
  • For the love of God, don't say "Anime is for jerks."
 
Thanks.
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Why Do Bosses Suck So Much Nowadays?

 Think back, what's the last game you played that didn't have a shitty boss fight? 

There's games like God of War 3 that have good boss fights (I thought Hades was fucking awesome, there's some other great ones in there, too) but not all are that fantastic.  There's games like Uncharted 2, Batman:AA that, for whatever reason, still think they need a "final boss" to end a game just because that's the way games have worked for a long time and if they don't have a final boss there somehow not doing what they should, even if that "final boss" is complete shit. Does anyone remember that stupid train boss in UC2? That was not fucking necessary, and was one of the worst video game decisions ever.  I can't remember for sure, but I think I remember getting pissed off at some Infamous bosses. Some just have retardedly repetitve boss fights, like Batman or Resident Evil 5. 
 
I think boss fights are slowly getting worse and worse as time goes on. I've never felt that hack n' slashes in general were good things to have bosses. God of War definitely has it's moments, but there's also a lot of disappointing and anticlimactic boss fights in them, too. The only type of games where I know bosses will still be great are 2D ones.  
 
So, I think, instead of cramming so many boss fights into one game like many devs do, just take your time and make a really good boss fights that works well with the mechanics of your game, and if you can't make a good boss fight, DON'T MAKE ONE. And for the love of God, not every games needs to have a final boss. 

So, to answer my question at the beginning, I guess I'd have to say Metal Gear Solid 4, then maybe Super Mario Galaxy. 
 
Also... agree, disagree? 

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Overpoliteness=Unpolite?

So I went to a restaurant the other day and our waiter literally said "Pardon me" every 5 fucking seconds. *Picks up plate* "pardon me"  *picks up other plate* "pardon me" *lays down plate* "pardon me" *walks away* "pardon me, pardon me, pardon me, pardon me* 
 
SHUT THE FUCK UP PLEASE  

I don't care if you think you're nice, your just fucking annoying.      
 
Anyone else feel this way?

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Resident Evil 5: Lost In Nightmares Review

Hate me for posting this on my blog, I don't care! 

Resident Evil 5: Lost In Nightmares Review

A Nice, Nostalgic Throwback to Resdent Evil's Old Days


 Note: This Review Is For Resident Evil 5's   Lost In Nightmares DLC. For My Resident Evil 5 Review, Go Here.

The original   Resident Evil 5 strayed away from   Resident Evil's old formula a lot, even more so than   Resident Evil 4. For fan's of the old formula, meaning locked doors,   traps,   levers, a lack of weapons, and most of all, a scary, on-the-edge-of-
 Hmmm... that looks familiar. 
your-seat atmosphere, you'll love Resident Evil 5's new   downloadable content, Lost In Nightmares, because it diverts back to the old Resident Evil's old days. 
 
Lost In Nightmares puts you in the shoes and brings back together the original zombie-slaughtering   S.T.A.R.S.  duo,   Jill Valentine  and   Chris Redfield. You will be playing through the   flashback  at the   Ozwell E. Spencermansion that Chris mentioned in Resident Evil 5. Even though the mansion isn't the same one that you were in during the events of   Resident Evil,   Capcom  makes sure it bares a very strong resemblance to the   Racoon City  mansion.   
 
The DLC is full of   fan service and nostalgia. It practically uses everything it can to throw back to the 1996 horror classic. Jill will play Moonlight Sonota on a   piano  to open a secret door, there's a   dining room  with a fireplace, there's a long   hallway  with the many windows resembling the classic "dog hallway", a slow, long, unnecessary first-person door opening sequence, and best of all, a hidden fixed camera angle that makes the game feel like the   Playstation 1  classics.  
  
Other than the mansion, you'll have to work you way through a underground dungeon area where you'll meet some hideous monsters. Sadly, there's only one hideous monster. The DLC only has, other than the final boss, one enemy. You'll
 Ahhhhhhh!!
encounter this enemy many times, but some variety would have been nice. And speaking of the final boss, the fight is pretty much identical to RE5's Wesker  fight, which is extremely disappointing, because those fights were never much fun.    
 You'll be shooting this guy less... and running from him more.
Sadly, Lost In Nightmares suffers from the same problems as Resident Evil 5 such as clunky inventory (even though this is a very small problem since inventory is much less important in this DLC) and the awful AI partner. Like the original, you must play it co-op or you won't have much fun.
 
The DLC also introduces the "Mercernaries Reunion" game mode. It's just like Resident Evil 5's Mercernaries mode, you will take on wave upon wave of enemies while trying to keep a streak going and collecting more and more time to get a high score, except with new characters, such as   Rebecca Chambers  Barry Burton, and   Excella Gionne. They even throw in a little reference to the first Residet Evil here, one of Barry's   melee  attacks is called a "Barry Sandwich".   

Lost In Nightmares is extremely short, roughly the length of the average Resident Evil 5 chapter. There's no saving, so if you don't beat it all in one go you'll have to restart the whole thing. The price tag, at $5, is very small. In a way, it is exactly what I was hoping RE5 would be, sadly I only get it in a half an hour DLC bit.

4.5/5 Stars

 
If you like it, go recommend it!
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"Last Time On..."

/rant
 
So, I started watching Dexter last week. 
 
Now, as most of your probably know, a lot of story based shows do the "Last Time On <Insert Show Here>" 
 
I'm all for recapping for the people who haven't been watching, but these things are useless. If I'd never have seen the show before I'd not have the slightest idea of the fuck was going. They just jump to certain things and give no backstory, thus most of it makes no sense to new viewers.
 
I think if there going to take 2-3 minutes to do this they should at least do it right. Since it's not done right here, it's just fucking annoying. 
 
/endrant 

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Looking To Start Watching a New TV Show

I recently got Netflix and want to get into a new TV through the instant streaming.  
 
Which should I watch first? I don't really know much about any of these shows, and have never watched any of them before in my life, but I know they're all (so I've heard) somewhat good. 
 

  • Doctor Who
  • Dexter
  • Lost
  • Heroes
  • Weeds
  • Californication
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Indigo Prophecy Review

Just posted my Indigo Prophecy review, it's my 32nd review on Giant Bomb. I can feel myself getting gradually better at writing these things, my earlier reviews are complete garbage. Feedback is always nice, by the way. Also, if you genuinely like, recommend it on the review page.

Indigo Prophecy Review

A Great Game Built on a Great Concept Brought Down By a Few Mistakes

 

Warning: This Review Contains Some Early Plot Point Spoilers From Indigo Prophecy, But Nothing from Later in the Game. The Section With Spoilers Has Been Marked.
 
Indigo Prophecy is a game for few people. I suppose most "gamers" will like it, but if an average Joe come and picks it up he'll probably be setting it down rather quickly. The game's premise is one of the best ever, period. The opening
 Lucas Kane
cutscene will intrigue you so much you'll think you'll want to keep playing this game from start to finish. I guess that's one of the game's biggest problems, it starts on such a high point and can't maintain it throughout the entirety of the experience. 
 
For those who love a good story in games, Indigo Prophecy is a great game for you as the plot is the focus of the game, leaving the gameplay to suffer a little bit because of that. For those of you who skip all the cutscenes in the games you play and could care less about the storyline, well, look away now because IP is not for you. Indigo Prophecy is mainly a cinematic experience, so much sothat the start menu says "Start Movie" and the game's tutorial takes place on Indigo Prophecy's "set", with the director and writer telling you how to play the game. 
  
The game's protagonist,  Lucas Kane, walks into a local diner's bathroom and brutally stabs a man to death. While doing so, he seems to be possessed and is experiencing weird visions. This is where you pick up as the player. You'll play as Lucas along with other characters such as the two policeman investigating the murder,  Tyler Miles and  Carla Valenti, and Lucas' brother  Markus Kane. The game goes back and forth between Lucas trying to figure out how and why he killed the man in the diner and Tyler and Carla trying to solve the murder. As Tyler and Carla you'll investigate crime scenes, interrogate witnesses and suspects, try to find connections between
The game often splits the screen in two, showing what other key things are going on.
evidence and other policeman-like things. As Lucas you'll try to find answers as to why you've done what you've done.
 
The game's story, especially the first half of it, is incredible. Unfortunately it takes a turn about halfway through and the game turns into a sci-fi movie and escapes from realism completely. It's still a somewhat strong story, but compared to the first half, it doesn't really hold up too well. 
 
The game focuses on and seems to lean on a lot on unnecessary quick time events. During the game's action sequences you'll be required to use two different kinds of QTE's. One is just hitting A and D (or L1 and R1 on the console, or whatever you have your controls set to for the PC version) back and forth. Now, after you've done this many a time it gets real old real fast. The other is simply matching the buttons that appear one screen. It gives you 8 buttons that appear in what looks like a Simon Says layout. You must match these as they appear on screen. The QTE's are dumb. I'm going to be clear with that. They shouldn't be in this game, at least not when they are in this form. There's only two different kinds and they are often dragged on and dragged on forever and sometimes used when during the game's few
 Indigo Prophecy's dialogue gameplay.
long, drawn out and tedious minigames such as having a boxing match and playing basketball. Sometimes they're extremely misused for things like having a simple conversation. I would much prefer to just watch the damn cutscene. By far, this is my biggest pet peeve about IP.
 
In a way, the gameplay of IP feels like an adventure game. You can and must walk around (with the game's clunky movement controls and bad camera) to different items as most of them can be interacted with. The phone, the  refrigerator, cabinets, the closet, the TV, a guitar, a computer, everything. It may not be appealing to some, but the game does have you carry out everyday things during some sequences. For example, you'll have to take a shower, get dressed, eat and then go to work. The character's social life often come into play in the game, such as Tyler having girlfriend problems, or having to talk to your neighbor as Carla. The game does have two notably annoying sequences. These are when Carla, who has a problem with claustrophobia, has trouble breathing. They are both trial and error sequences and one of them goes on for much longer than it should. You must use the gamed dreaded QTE's to control her problems.
 
You'll be able to alter the course of the game's story somewhat with the game's dialogue options. The dialogue choices present with a few issues, though. Sometimes they'll be misleading, because it'll only give a word or two from what your character will say and he or she will end up saying something completely unexpected. Also, the dialogue options are
 An example of the games awful quick time events.
sometimes trial and error, some will result in you literally failing because you said it and you'll have to do it all over again. Other than that, the dialogue choices keep the game fresh and allow for multiple playthroughs, even if some of the dialogue lines are extremely cheesy and occasionally poorly voiced.
 
The game also tries one thing that it shouldn't: stealth. Lucas has a few flashbacks to his childhood throughout the game and they play like stealth sequences. With the game's bad camera and bad controls, these are hell. They are also trial and error and feel like they were slapped on without a whole lot of work
 
Most of the objectives in the game are given through the cutscenes. So it's probably a given that you'll zone out and some point or look away from the screen and you'll completely miss what to do. This can be frustrating, and the only solution to it is walking around aimlessly and trying to find out what you're suppose to do as the game rarely puts prompts or notes on the screen that will send you in the right direction. 
 
When it's all said and done, you'll probably walk away from Indigo Prophecy disappointed. This is only because it has a great opening to it and it creates a lot of high hopes which it doesn't completely deliver on. It could have been a better game, for sure. It has some memorable moments that are so great. It has some that are memorable because of how ridiculous they are. It also has some memorable because you have no idea of why they thought it was a good idea to put that in a video game.
 
3.5/5 Stars
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