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#1 Edited by ShockD (2409 posts) -

Just wondering what do people on the other side of the globe have on their dinner plates. Now I'm not interested in cheeseburgers, pizza and tacos; rather in the food that you actually cook. Do you have any national dishes?

#2 Posted by aquamarin (555 posts) -

Baked beans. various types of marinated or breaded meats grilled, broiled or pan-fried. Mixed vegetables out of bags from my grocers freezer. Salads. Potatoes prepared in various ways, baked, oven fries, buttered red skinned potatoes.

#3 Posted by Kidavenger (3582 posts) -

Growing up, we usually had chicken/beef/pork with potatoes and a vegetable on the side, or pasta usually spaghetti or lasagna.

Now that I'm cooking my own dinners, it's a lot of chilli, chicken and rice, fresh pasta, bbq, and eggs.

#4 Posted by Dagbiker (6978 posts) -

Chicken, but they only really sell the legs, wings, and breasts.

#5 Posted by WMoyer83 (647 posts) -

Enchiladas! Down here in New Mexico we put green chile on everything. We love posole, chili con carne, chili rellenos, and tamales.

#6 Posted by mosespippy (4285 posts) -

I don't think anyone actually cooks here anymore. Not from my generation at least; the older folks do. Now all we eat are precooked meals from the frozen aisle at the grocery store.

Personally I hate the precooked stuff and I actually know how to cook, plus you can't get moose or seal commercially. Normally for supper I'll have a piece of meat (steak, porkchop, salmon, cod, chicken, etc) and I'll fry it with mushrooms, onions and peppers, or grill it and have it with rice, peas, corn, carrots and beans. For breakfast I like cream and cheese scrambled eggs with maple sausage.

We eat a lot of food from other parts of the world too. Pizza, spaghetti, lasagna, burritos, tacos, sushi, fish & chips, etc. The only things that I can think of as uniquely Canadian are poutine, nanaimo bars and beaver tails. In Newfoundland we also have seal flipper pie but you can't get that in the rest of the country.

#7 Posted by uniform (1836 posts) -

Green tea and chives.

#8 Posted by Bwast (1342 posts) -

Things from Labrador that I like are caribou, moose, salt beef, and fish and brewis(hard bread that is soaked in water, mixed with salt fish and topped with pork scrunchions.). Poutine would be the national dish, I guess. There's a hockey arena Quebec town that me and friends go to when our team goes over to play them. They make a deadly poutine.

#9 Posted by NTM (7480 posts) -

I won't add anything here other than, well, I don't care for taco's as you had mentioned. Burrito's are better.

#10 Posted by Brendan (7843 posts) -

It's pretty culturally diverse over here so there isn't a set 5 dishes that we all eat or something. For example, my family will make some kind of Mexican dish one night, something Mediterranean another night, something British another night, and so on.

#11 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -

Canadians and Americans.

#12 Posted by Tesla (1932 posts) -

It varies by state. Pigs and corn are big in Iowa, fish and Cuban/Puerto Rican food are prevalent in Florida, lobster in Maine, etc. It just depends on the geographic region and what is readily available there.

Online
#13 Posted by Bourbon_Warrior (4523 posts) -

Each Other

#14 Posted by louiedog (2335 posts) -

Americans eat everything. If I walk north of my apartment for 10 minutes I'll pass Indian, Japanese, Thai, Chinese, Korean, BBQ, hamburgers, sandwiches, Ethiopian, bagels, Greek, Italian, pizza (no, not the same as an Italian restaurant), steak, seafood, etc. We've adopted cuisines from around the world. I love to cook and do so regularly and I've made dishes from most of the cuisines listed above. I have a lot of family roots consisting of farmers that go back to before many of the English colonies even existed in North America and we don't really eat any classic English dishes either.

Canadians eat Kraft dinner.

#15 Posted by mbdoeden (189 posts) -

You have to remember the things we actually cook in the US are the same, or variations of, "European" dinners. This is a country of immigrants, after all.

While growing up my family made the following from scratch:

Vegetable Beef Soup, Chicken Noodle Soup, borscht, lasagna, carpaccio, fuckin' apple pie, beef pot roast.

This is coming from a family German/Scottish/Native American decent. I'd say the most "North American" thing we would eat was steak, texas toast, and a salad.

Online
#16 Posted by Kidavenger (3582 posts) -

Something that is common in Canada that isn't anywhere else in the world from what I can tell is smoked meat sandwiches.

#17 Posted by Robot_Sneakers (418 posts) -

I'm American and we don't really have any special dishes at my house, we buy local vegetables (when we can), maybe some fruit as well and usually serve it with meat, fish, steak or chicken and sometimes pork. Nothing special

#18 Posted by stonepawfox (236 posts) -

i either assume people in the united states eat a lot of things that are particularly from their familial background (for example we've always been fond of pierogies and kielbasa, and golumpkis (stuffed cabbage) since my family has polish roots). a combination of that and most of the time eating like, generic cut of cow/chicken/pork with some kind of starch and vegetable. fish doesn't seem as popular a lot of the time, but I'm from new england so seafood is pretty available. i don't know much about canada, i have a friend in vancouver but their eating habits sound much the same.

#19 Edited by BraveToaster (12589 posts) -

There are no "national dishes". The U.S. is a melting pot and people eat different things. I thought that was pretty obvious, but whatever.

#20 Posted by Hunkulese (2787 posts) -

Food.

#21 Posted by MrKlorox (11209 posts) -

This just in, pizza, tacos, and hamburgers are not things you cook.

#22 Edited by RedRoach (1199 posts) -

@louiedog said:

Americans eat everything. If I walk north of my apartment for 10 minutes I'll pass Indian, Japanese, Thai, Chinese, Korean, BBQ, hamburgers, sandwiches, Ethiopian, bagels, Greek, Italian, pizza (no, not the same as an Italian restaurant), steak, seafood, etc. We've adopted cuisines from around the world. I love to cook and do so regularly and I've made dishes from most of the cuisines listed above. I have a lot of family roots consisting of farmers that go back to before many of the English colonies even existed in North America and we don't really eat any classic English dishes either.

Canadians eat Kraft dinner.

Hey! I eat all those different things!

...but I also had Kraft dinner last night.

#23 Posted by mordukai (7157 posts) -

I won't know aboot Canadians but given America's history then the food here is extremely diverse. As far as traditional things then it really varies by region. Here in Wisconsin the main influence is German and Dutch so you'll see a lot of kinds of meats you'll find in those countries. However, you can also find foods from all over the world in almost every major city here.

#24 Edited by CornBREDX (5623 posts) -

A majority of American food came from the great depression. Things like Hot Dogs, Spam, and probably other processed foods similar I'm not thinking of. Ham hocks and Black eyed pea soup, Chicken and mash potatoes (with gravy), Chicken and dumplings... etc.

There isn't a lot that is eaten in America that didn't come from somewhere else beyond Burgers and fries or maybe processed foods (which there is a lot of these days). I know there's other stuff but majority of the food here is just something from somewhere else or an American spin on it.

Cheese on Apple Pie seems to blow some peoples minds. Or Ketchup on eggs. That seems to be a southern thing though (a lot of my Family is from the South). Going around the US at times is like going to different countries sometimes. There's a lot of differences even by states.

#25 Posted by Redhorn (225 posts) -

I'm about to have some cereal in milk for breakfast, and I've been sipping on this black tea here and there.

#26 Posted by ryoma122 (699 posts) -

@antikorper: each other when they can get away with it

im sorry i just could not stop my self

#27 Posted by Azteck (7449 posts) -

Köttbullar. Nothing else.

#28 Edited by Ravenlight (8040 posts) -

@antikorper said:

Just wondering what do people on the other side of the globe have on their dinner plates. Now I'm not interested in cheesbugers, pizza and tacos; rather in the food that you actually cook. Do you have any national dishes?

I'm offended that you'd not consider pizza, tacos, and cheeseburgers national dishes! I cooked one of each of those at home last week.

@BraveToaster said:

The U.S. is a melting pot

So fondue, then.

#29 Posted by Smashlampjaw (220 posts) -

@MrKlorox said:

This just in, pizza, tacos, and hamburgers are not things you cook.

you can cook a hamburger I beg to differ

#30 Edited by AlexW00d (6303 posts) -

@Brendan said:

It's pretty culturally diverse over here so there isn't a set 5 dishes that we all eat or something. For example, my family will make some kind of Mexican dish one night, something Mediterranean another night, something British another night, and so on.

You kind of missed the point of the question. Those aren't national dishes. What are national dishes of America/Canada?

E: From holidays there, I can tell you grits are an American thing. I dunno what the fuck they are, but I have only ever seen them in America.

Online
#31 Posted by MrKlorox (11209 posts) -
@Smashlampjaw said:

@MrKlorox said:

This just in, pizza, tacos, and hamburgers are not things you cook.

you can cook a hamburger I beg to differ

That was my point. The OP implied these were not things people cooked.
#32 Posted by Codeacious (960 posts) -

Pasta, paninis, grilled meat/veggies, mashed potatoes, a variety of Tex-Mex (I'm from Texas), among other things. There's really no shortage of diverse food, too, if you want something exotic.

#33 Posted by Hailinel (25179 posts) -

Soylent Green.

#34 Posted by Herocide (442 posts) -
#35 Edited by Trilogy (2675 posts) -

I can't speak for Canada but here, it's kind of a mixing pot when it comes to food culture. BBQ is huge here.

Personally, I'm from New Orleans, Louisiana so I love seafood and creole cajun cooking. Fried catfish, boiled crawfish, blue crab, shrimp, po-boys (french bread sandwiches), muffuletta (Sicilian sandwich), Jambalaya, étouffée, gumbo, ect. All of those foods I just listed are the backbone of Louisiana cuisine but it's influenced from around the world. African, Spanish, French, Italian, ect. And that's just one state.

What I'm saying is it's hard to answer your question in a sentence or two when speaking of real American food and not just the hot dog/hamburger stuff.

#36 Posted by jonnyboy (2920 posts) -

Absolutely anything.

#37 Edited by dcgc (878 posts) -

I actually wanted to know something due to watching some US TV Shows about americans and canadians (it doesn't have anything to do with food from these countries and I should probably start a thread for this kind of question, but what the heck): why do americans or some of them make fun of canadians? I don't know about the opposite (canadians making fun of americans), but why does this happen? I never really understood what is wrong with Canada for it being dissed a lot (I presume).

#38 Posted by MyaSharona (67 posts) -

@dcgc: canadians do make fun of americans. a lot.

But the people in both US and CAN who partake in this 'rivalry' are usually the people who have never been to the other place. The cultural differences are not as vast as each thinks.

=)

#39 Posted by Soapy86 (2634 posts) -

I would say roughly 90% of the average American's diet consists of animal fat and candy.

#40 Posted by the_OFFICIAL_jAPanese_teaBAG (4308 posts) -

Canada's very multicultural so we eat a lot of different things

#41 Posted by gorkamorkaorka (442 posts) -

Where is OP from? Most of my diet consists of peanut butter sandwiches and black tea with sugar. Also, a lot of microwaveable food of Mexican or Italian variety. Then sometimes I have a sandwich on white wheat made out of black forest ham and American cheese.

#42 Edited by believer258 (11992 posts) -

@louiedog said:

Americans eat everything. If I walk north of my apartment for 10 minutes I'll pass Indian, Japanese, Thai, Chinese, Korean, BBQ, hamburgers, sandwiches, Ethiopian, bagels, Greek, Italian, pizza (no, not the same as an Italian restaurant), steak, seafood, etc. We've adopted cuisines from around the world. I love to cook and do so regularly and I've made dishes from most of the cuisines listed above. I have a lot of family roots consisting of farmers that go back to before many of the English colonies even existed in North America and we don't really eat any classic English dishes either.

Canadians eat Kraft dinner.

Pretty much that. I don't know about Canadians, but Americans just pick something and eat it.

A generic meal around here (North Carolina, for me) is chicken or pork chops and a side or two of vegetables. Mashed potatoes, macaroni n' cheese, and biscuits (not cookies, biscuits) are often present.

#43 Posted by aquamarin (555 posts) -

@gorkamorkaorka said:

Most of my diet consists of peanut butter sandwiches and black tea with sugar.

I forgot about those. Yeah Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are basically a staple for me, gotta have one every couple of days. Also Burritos from various Mexican "Grilles" where you pick the contents of the burrito, restaurants such as Chipotle, Qdoba etc., there's a million of them.

#44 Edited by Ersanven (91 posts) -

Bacon and fried anything is the national food of the USA. Also molten cheese.

But really. It's all regional in the US. The US is too big and culturally stratified to have something like a national food.

#45 Edited by TooSweet (389 posts) -

Rice, Beans, Chicken, Ox Tail, Steak, Plantains (Green or Yellow), Pasta, Beef, Avocados, Yuca, Potato etc... Spanish speaking home. Since living on my own I make it on occasion but not often. I know plenty of people with restaurants that I can get that type of food at or just go to a relative's house. They are always happy to see me. =)

But if not that type of food, tuna sandwiches, halal cart, pizza and on occasion a burger. But I prefer what my family makes. Lots of cultures and variety of food.

Edit: Oops, mine are not national. =/ Sorry.

#46 Posted by ShockD (2409 posts) -
@Ravenlight said:

@antikorper said:

Just wondering what do people on the other side of the globe have on their dinner plates. Now I'm not interested in cheesbugers, pizza and tacos; rather in the food that you actually cook. Do you have any national dishes?

I'm offended that you'd not consider pizza, tacos, and cheeseburgers national dishes! I cooked one of each of those at home last week.


They are national dishes, but do not originate from the US or Canada.
#47 Posted by mikethekilla (328 posts) -

BBQ is is pretty big out here in USA

#48 Edited by s10129107 (1184 posts) -

You have to understand that North America is an Incredibly diverse continent. Different people cook different things. There is no national standard. We have Italian, Mexican, Polish, Cuban, Peurto Rican, Chinese, Indian, Jamaican and every other conceivable kind of food here. Some people are incredibly unimaginative and eat boring food, but a lot of Americans mix and match many of the dominant culinary influences on a daily basis. Most importantly everyone is different and, i'll say it again, there is NO STANDARD.

EDIT:: That being said there is a lot of iconic American food down south.

#49 Posted by Jams (2962 posts) -

@AlexW00d said:

@Brendan said:

It's pretty culturally diverse over here so there isn't a set 5 dishes that we all eat or something. For example, my family will make some kind of Mexican dish one night, something Mediterranean another night, something British another night, and so on.

You kind of missed the point of the question. Those aren't national dishes. What are national dishes of America/Canada?

E: From holidays there, I can tell you grits are an American thing. I dunno what the fuck they are, but I have only ever seen them in America.

Grits are similar if not the same as polenta and I think Mexicans use it to make tortillas. Just ground up corn meal.

#50 Posted by McGhee (6094 posts) -

@antikorper said:

Now I'm not interested in cheeseburgers, pizza and tacos; rather in the food that you actually cook.

Those are foods I actually cook. -__-